Is Parliament still suspended? What ruling prorogation as ‘unlawful’ actually means – and what happens next

The Government has said it intends to appeal to the Supreme Court after three Court of Session judges in Scotland ruled Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament early is unlawful.

A group of MPs, angry with the decision to suspend Parliament, took the matter to the courts last month, but were initially dismissed by a judge who last week said the dispute was a matter for the Commons and not the judiciary.

But following an appeal, judges on Wednesday ruled that ministers had shut down the Commons for the “improper purpose of stymying Parliament”.

The three judges went as far as to say the advice given to the Queen, which led to the prorogation, was misleading and unlawful “and is thus null and of no effect”.

Speculation was mounting that Boris Johnson could be ready to make a compromise on Brexit
Boris Johnson said he prorogued Parliament in order to set out a new Queens Speech (Photo: Toby Melville/Getty)

Downing Street has maintained its argument that the five-week prorogation has been undertaken to allow the new Government to set out its legislative programme in a Queen’s Speech, and said it will appeal the judgement.

But the fact that this highly political issue has seeped into the courts is a significant moment for the Government and, possibly, the constitution.

Has Parliament been recalled?

The Prime Minister has faced demands from angry opposition MPs for Parliament to immediately be recalled in light of the ruling.

They argued that prorogation should be set aside without delay to allow for the Commons to continue holding the Government to account over its Brexit plans.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer said: “What Boris Johnson should do is to urgently recall Parliament. We should be back there this afternoon, or tomorrow, so we can debate this judgment, and we can decide what to do next.”

The court ruled that the prorogation was unlawful (PA)

But the Government immediately lodged an appeal against the ruling and officials said that, until the case is concluded, Parliament will remain prorogued.

What happens next?

The case has now been referred to the UK Supreme Court, which is expected to hear the arguments on Tuesday and announce a ruling later in the week.

If the Supreme Court judges disagree with Wednesday’s ruling then the Prime Minister will be free to continue with his suspension of Parliament until 14 October.

But if the court rules that prorogation is unlawful it could strike a huge blow to Mr Johnson’s strategy, as he will be expected to abide by the judges’ decision.

This situation could see the Prime Minister forced to go back to the Queen and advise her to recall Parliament immediately, causing MPs to return to sit in the Commons.

Angry scenes in the house of Commons as Parliament was suspended (Twitter)

Or, the Supreme Court judges could rule the unlawful nature of the prorogation actually means Parliament was never suspended in the eyes of the law and is still technically in session.

Either way, the prediction is that MPs will have to be called back to Parliament as soon as possible if the Government loses the appeal.

Raphael Hogarth, an associate at the Institute for Government, said: “If the Supreme Court rules next week that the prorogation was unlawful, then I’d expect Parliament to be sitting again in very short order.

“The mechanics of that depend on what the court says. The court might say that Parliament was never prorogued at all in the eyes of the law and so is actually still sitting after all. Or, the Government might need to recall Parliament immediately.”

Could Mr Johnson refuse?

Although the Queen is the one with the power to recall or prorogue Parliament, she can only do so on the advice of her Prime Minister.

The Queen approved the suspension request at Balmoral
The Queen could be left in a very awkward position if the PM does not back down (Photo: Getty)

If Mr Johnson refuses to do this, it could leave the Queen in a very difficult position, threatening to politicise her role as monarch.

It would also likely spark anger among MPs who are already furious at the prorogation.

It is hard to see a way that Mr Johnson could ignore such a significant court ruling, as doing so would plunge the country into a constitutional crisis involving the Government, the Queen and the judiciary.

Former attorney general Dominic Grieve, who has been a critic of Mr Johnson’s strategy, said that if the Supreme Court does rule that ministers have misled the Queen then the Prime Minister should resign.

“It is absolutely central to our constitution that the relationship between the Prime Minister and the Queen is one of the utmost confidentiality and the utmost good faith. Central,” he told the BBC.

Boris Johnson is the person with the power to instruct the Queen to prorogue or recall Parliament (Photo: PA)

“So, if it were to be the case that the Government had misled the Queen about the reasons for suspending Parliament and the motives for it, that would be a very serious matter indeed.

“Indeed in my view, it would then be the moment for Mr Johnson to resign and very swiftly.”

What does this all mean for Brexit?

Regardless of whether Parliament is recalled or not, the legislation MPs put forward designed to prevent a no deal has already received Royal Assent and is now part of UK law.

But MPs are angry that prorogation has reduced the opportunities for MPs to scrutinise the Government over its Brexit strategy.

It means there is less time for the Commons to debate Brexit before 31 October and also means the Prime Minister can avoid a certain amount of scrutiny – as he did on Wednesday by not attending a Commons committee meeting which was due to question him on Brexit for three hours.

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Nigel Farage says Brexit Party ready to back Boris Johnson in general election and ‘rout Remainers’ – in return for no deal

Nigel Farage has offered to support Boris Johnson in an election if he promises to pursue a “clean break Brexit” and scrap any re-worked version of the old deal.

The Brexit Party covered the front of the Daily Express with an advert carrying a letter from its leader Mr Farage addressed to the Prime Minister and offering him an election deal.

He said he was prepared to back Mr Johnson in an election if the Prime Minister pushes for a “clean-break Brexit” and abandons any plan to recycle a version of Theresa May’s deal.

But the Prime Minister has ruled out a pact with the party.

Unite against Remainers

The newspaper advert

In the four-page spread Mr Farage challenged Mr Johnson on whether he “has the courage” to meet his party’s demands and said he was prepared to unite with him against any “Remainer alliance” if he did.

“Many of us are disgusted by the antics in Parliament of the Remainer alliance. These MPs want to stop Brexit, at any cost to democracy,” he wrote.

“Now Boris faces a crucial choice. Will he push for a clean-break Brexit? Or will he try placating the EU by resuscitating Theresa May’s appalling Withdrawal Agreement. Even backstop-free, May’s Withdrawal Agreement remains the worst deal in history.”

He said his party, which has already released candidate lists ahead of an expected election, was “ready to put country before party”.

Mr Farage urged Mr Johnson to back a no deal Brexit in a full-page newspaper advert

Ruled out by PM

“We would not stand against [Mr Johnson’s] candidates in the seats where they are threatened by Lib Dems and other Remainers – indeed we would campaign for them,” he said.

“A non-aggression pact would let us concentrate our fire on the Remainer establishment. Unstoppable together, we would deliver a large Brexit majority in Parliament.”

The advert also sets out other Brexit Party policies which have been relatively thin on the ground as it focuses its message on pushing for a no-deal Brexit.

It said the part would prioritise investment in parts of the country outside London, including boosting transport and, high streets and access to broadband.

A Number 10 spokesman said Mr Johnson is not planning to enter any election pact with Mr Farage and his party.

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Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament early was ‘unlawful’, Scottish court rules

A court in Scotland has ruled that the Prime Minister’s decision to prorogue Parliament early was unlawful.

MPs opposing Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend Parliament had their case dismissed by a judge last week after it was deemed to be a matter for the Commons, not the courts.

But, on Wednesday, they won an appeal at the Court of Session where three judges disagreed and ruled the controversial prorogation was, in fact, in breach of the law.

The case is now expected to go to the Supreme Court where the UK Government will challenge the ruling.

MPs leading the appeal said outside the court that this should be celebrated as a victory for those wanting to show Mr Johnson that he could not just do whatever he wanted.

Prorogation was unlawful

But it is unclear what the impact of the ruling will be on MPs, who have already left Parliament following prorogation in the early hours of Tuesday.

The rule paper said “all three judges have decided that the PM’s advice to the HM the Queen is justiciable, that it was motivated by the improper purpose of stymying Parliament and that it, and what has followed from it, is unlawful”.

It added: “The court will accordingly make an Order declaring that the Prime Minister’s advice to HM The Queen and the prorogation which followed thereon was unlawful and this null and of no effect.”

Jolyon Maugham QC, on of the petitioners leading the appeal, said the case would go to the Supreme Court on Tuesday next week.

He tweeted: “We believe that the effect of the decision is that Parliament is no longer prorogued.

“I have never been able to contemplate the possibility that the law could be that our sovereign Parliament might be treated as an inconvenience by the Prime Minister.

“I am pleased that Scotland’s highest court agrees. But ultimately, as has always been the case, it’s the final arbiter’s decision that matters.”

This story is being updated.

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Why did MPs try to sit on Speaker John Bercow? The centuries-old tradition explained as Parliament is prorogued

The House of Commons exhibited rare scenes of chaos on Monday night as rowdy MPs who were angry with the Prime Minister’s decision to prorogue Parliament early began protesting as it came to a close.

During the official Prorogation ceremony, opposition MPs attempted to disrupt the process in the House by sending chants of “shame on you” across the chamber.

They shouted as Lady Usher of the Black Rod Sarah Clarke – who controls access in the House of Lords and takes part in official ceremonies around the opening and closing of Parliament – tried to speak.

As she attempted to fulfil her constitutional duty, by announcing to the Speaker that the Parliamentary session was coming to an end, MPs on the opposition benches drowned her out with jeers and shouts.

Lady Usher of the Black Rod Sarah Clarke (C) entering the House of Commons during the ceremony to prorogue (suspend) parliament. – (Photo: Getty)

MPs protest

A group of opposition MPs waved signs reading “silenced” and some were involved in a small scuffle next to the Speaker’s Chair.

They attempted to stop John Bercow from leaving his seat and walking through the chamber into the House Of Lords, which is part of the prorogation ceremony.

Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle tried to throw himself across the chair in order to stop him leaving in a dramatic moment of protest, before he was pushed away by a member of Commons staff.

Mr Russell-Moyle went so far as to briefly lie across Mr Bercow’s lap before he was jostled out the way.

Green party leader Caroline Lucas was also seen getting involved in the kerfuffel as she jostled with other MPs heckling and shouting by the chair.

Another Labour MP, Clive Lewis, who was also involved in the protest, later tweeted that they “symbolically opposed the prorogation of Parliament” through their actions.

Angry scenes in the house of Commons (Twitter)

He said the move was supposed to be based on an event in 1629 when MPs pinned the Speaker to his seat in an attempt to prevent the prorogation of Parliament.

…1629?

Prorogation was first introduced in the 15th Century, which allowed a monarch to summon or dismiss Parliament as they wished. Unlike today it was not a decision taken by Parliament but by the Queen or King at the time.

One of the most famous cases of prorogation in British history was when Charles I prorogued Parliament in 1629 because it was hostile to him imposing certain taxes without the authority of Parliament.

King Charles I of England (Photo: Getty Images)

Under customs of the time, Parliament traditionally allowed the monarch to collect what was known as the “tonnage and poundage” levy for life – but in a bid to quell Charles’s autonomy, it only granted him the privilege for one year.

He collected the tax regardless, leading to resentment and opposition from MPs. He responded by ordering that Parliament should be adjourned.

Civil war

When he ordered the parliamentary adjournment, members held the Speaker, Sir John Finch, down in his chair so that the official ceremony of the ending the session would have to be delayed long enough for resolutions against Catholicism, Arminianism and tonnage and poundage could be read out and acclaimed by the chamber.

Circa 1649, A depiction of the ‘trial’ at Westminster Hall, London, King Charles (Photo:Getty Images)

Charles dissolved Parliament, imprisoned nine MPs and did not reconvene the Commons for 11 years.

During the years of “personal rule” he sidestepped laws that stated only Parliament had the authority to raise taxes and fuelled anger that eventually let to the civil war and his execution for treason.

Fortunately the events of the early hours of Tuesday morning were not quite so dramatic.

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Lib Dems would revoke Article 50 and cancel Brexit immediately if they won election, Jo Swinson says

The Liberal Democrats are poised to campaign to revoke Article 50 and cancel Brexit altogether in an effort to ramp up their image as the pro-Europe party.

The party has been an avid supporter of holding another Brexit referendum, or a People’s Vote, which would give the British public the chance to vote to stay in the EU.

But party leader Jo Swinson has said that if she were elected Prime Minister with a majority in the Commons she would move to scrap Brexit immediately.

The proposal is due to be voted on by party members at the Lib Dem annual conference which starts on Saturday in Bournemouth.

Lib Dems would revoke Article 50

And if it is supported by the majority of the party it will be included in the Lib Dem manifesto for the next General Election.

Britain’s Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson (Photo: Reuters)

Ms Swinson tweeted that her party has “long argued for a People’s Vote. But if we have a general election before a People’s Vote, my position is clear. A Liberal Democrat majority government would revoke Article 50 and stop Brexit”.

She told The Guardian: “I relish the chance to take the fight to Boris Johnson in an election, and I’m confident we’d make significant gains.

“Whenever the election comes, our position is clear and unequivocal. A majority Liberal Democrat government would not renegotiate Brexit; we would cancel it by revoking Article 50 and remaining in the European Union.

Stopping Brexit

She said that since the referendum, the Conservatives have “made a mess of Brexit” and brought the country to the brink of no deal.

The Lib Dems are the “strongest” party for Remainers and those who support a People’s Vote, she said, and they are committed to stopping Brexit “so that we can mend our broken politics, build a fairer society and protect our planet”.

It is understood that the party would back immediate revocation of Article 50 in an election campaign but, if it did not win an outright majority, would go back to supporting a second referendum and campaigning to Remain.

New Lib Dem MP, Luciana Berger, said she “wholeheartedly support[s]” the policy and Chuka Umunna, another former Labour MP who joined the party, said the Lib Dems “make no apologies for seeking to stop Brexit”.

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Parliament prorogued: Stormy scenes of protest from furious MPs as Boris Johnson shuts down Commons

‘The House of Commons erupted into extraordinarily heated scenes in the early hours as Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, officially prorogued Parliament until the middle of October.

The five week suspension of Parliament began just before 2am after MPs rejected a last-ditch attempt from the Prime Minister to call an early general election.

Opposition MPs protested against the decision, shouting “shame on you” across to the Government benches and attempting to disrupt the traditional ceremony in raucous clashes in the Chamber.

Signs bearing the word “silenced” were held up by some Labour MPs, while Lloyd Russell-Moyle appeared to try to hold on to House Speaker John Bercow to prevent him leaving his seat and ending the Parliamentary session.

Commons protests

Mr Bercow expressed his own anger about the five-week suspension, saying it was  it was “not a normal prorogation” and was “an act of executive fiat”.

The late night drama unfolded after opposition MPs refused to back Mr Johnson’s bid to hold an election on 15 October and said a new law blocking a no-deal Brexit must be implemented first.

Mr Johnson responded by proroguing Parliament once the business of the day had concluded, having already received permission from the Queen to do so.

Parliament closed down

This drew to a close longest parliamentary session in history which began on 21 June 2017 and lasted a total of 810 calendar days.

MP will not reconvene until 14 October meaning they will not now be able to vote for an early election until after that date.

The exterior of the Houses of Parliament on January 21, 2019 (Getty Images)
The exterior of the Houses of Parliament, as it has been suspended until mid-October (Getty Images)

Under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act there is a five week gap between calling an election and holding it so it will now not be scheduled for any earlier than late November.

Mr Johnson faced anger from MPs after announcing he would prorogue Parliament early and before the Brexit leave date of 31 October.

He was criticised amid claims he was trying to shut down debate and prevent MPs from influencing the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

‘Avoiding scrutiny’

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said Mr Johnson was “only interested in shutting down Parliament to avoid any scrutiny”.

Mr Johnson remained insistent that he would not ask for another Brexit delay, despite royal assent being given to legislation requiring him to seek an extension if he cannot reach a deal.

Mr Johnson said: “I must warn members that their behaviour in thwarting the will of the people is undermining respect for this House in the country.”

Boris Johnson, flanked by Michael Gove (L), and Jacob Rees-Mogg (R), sits in the House of Commons (Photo: PA)

The Prime Minister added: “No matter how many devices this Parliament invents to tie my hands I will try to get an agreement in the national interest.

“This Government will not allow Brexit to be delayed any further. While the opposition run, they cannot hide forever.”

As the prorogation ceremony began opposition MPs reacted furiously and began chanting “shame on you, shame on you” across the Chamber.

They waved banners and tried to stop Mr Bercow leaving his chair to pass through House in a bid to halt proceedings.

‘Shameful’

As he did so, he was followed by Conservative MPs but opposition MPs remained on their benches and some broke into songs  including the Red Flag, Jerusalem, Scots Wha Hae and Bread of Heaven.

When the Speaker returned to the Commons following the completion of the ceremony he was met by opposition MPs who shook his hand.

Many then took to Twitter to share their anger at the Government’s decision.

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General election vote: Boris Johnson’s attempt to call snap election defeated by MPs who reject it until no-Brexit ruled out

MPs rejected a second attempt by the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, to call a snap general election before the Brexit deadline.

The Prime Minister said it was MPs last chance to give the public an opportunity to vote on the various parties’ Brexit strategies before the UK is due to leave the EU on 31 October.

But opposition MPs said Mr Johnson was merely using an election as a “ploy” to get around a new law that requires him to seek a three-month extension rather than take the UK out the EU without a deal.

They accused the Prime Minister of pretending to work towards a Brexit deal whilst actually aiming to pull the UK out without a deal on 31 October.

And they indicated they were prepared to hold out until after the Brexit date in order to ensure a no deal is definitely ruled out before supporting a snap election that could then take place in late November.

MPs distrustful of PM

Opposition leaders met today and agreed that they would not support an election until they were sure a no deal had been ruled out

Mr Johnson repeatedly said that he does not intend to request an extension – leading to concerns he could find a way around a new law passed by opposition MPs.

He put forward a second motion under the Fixed-Term Parliament Act, calling for an early election, but it was not backed by the required number of MPs to be passed.

MPs voted 293 to 46, short of the 434 needed – marking the new PM’s sixth Commons defeat.

Labour and the Liberal Democrats said they would not vote for an election until they were sure that a no-deal Brexit has been averted.

This implies they would wait until after the 31 October date when, under the new legislation, Mr Johnson should have requested another delay from the EU.

Labour said all opposition leader who met with Jeremy Corbyn’s on Monday had “agreed to work together to hold the Government to account in Parliament”.

Stand-off over no-deal Brexit

“All leaders agreed that they would not support Boris Johnson’s ploy to deny the people their decision by crashing us out of the EU with no deal during a general election campaign,” a spokeswoman said.

Boris Johnson speaking in Parliament (PA)

The Liberal Democrats said: “We were absolutely rock solid on rejecting out of hand Boris Johnson’s attempt to cut and run with a general election.”

Brexit spokesman Tom Brake said: “There’s absolutely no way we will let him do that before he’s secured an extension.”

Plaid Cymru and the Scottish National Party also confirmed they would vote against an election.

The Government, having lost the motion, prorogueed Parliament which means MPs will not sit in the House of Commons until 14 October.

The early suspension was opposed by opposition MPs who said that it is just another tactic of Mr Johnson to avoid scrutiny in the Commons.

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Who will be the next Speaker of the House of Commons? John Bercow’s possible replacements – and how likely they are

10 years after he took on the role, John Bercow has announced he is to step down as the Speaker of the House of Commons.

Mr Bercow is one of the longest serving Speakers of the modern era, having been the Speaker since 2009, when he replaced Lord Martin, who stepped down following the MPs’ expenses scandal.

His resignation comes at a pivotal time for parliament – at the centre of a struggle for power that has seen the British constitution tested to its limits.

The MP for Buckingham since 1997, he has attracted global attention as he presides over fraught debates and motions relating to Brexit.

The next Speaker could well attract similar controversy. As MPs have learned, there isn’t an easy way through the current Brexit quagmire.

Here’s who is in the running to replace Mr Bercow – and how likely they are to win:

Sir Lindsay Hoyle

Deputy speaker Lindsay Hoyle scolded the MPs for interrupting proceedings. (Parliament TV)
Deputy speaker Lindsay Hoyle scolding MPs for interrupting proceedings. (Parliament TV)

Party: Labour

Current position: Deputy Speaker of the Commons and MP for Chorley in Lancashire, since 1997

Previous roles: Sir Lindsay was the first Labour politician to represent Chorley at Westminster in 18 years and was part of the 1997 landslide intake.

He later served as a member of the House of Commons Trade and Industry Committee from 1998 to 2010 before being elected Chairman of Ways and Means and Deputy Speaker.

In his role as Deputy Speaker he has been praised for his ability to handle MPs during important votes or debates.

He was also in the Speaker’s Chair during the terrorist attack in Westminster in 2017.

Pitch: He is popular on both sides of the House and wants to position himself as the stable choice in unpredictable times.

Likelihood: Favourite

Harriet Harman

Harriet Harman is in contention to become Speaker after a long parliamentary career (Photo: Getty)

Party: Labour

Current position: Labour MP for Camberwell and Peckham, since 1982

Previous roles: She has served in various Cabinet and Shadow Cabinet positions and has twice stepped up to be acting leader of the Labour Party in opposition.

She held roles as the shadow minister for employment, health and social security when Labour was in opposition in the nineties and, when Tony Blair won a landslide victory, she was appointed as Secretary of State for Social Security and the first ever Minister for Women.

Ms Harman has also been Leader of the House of Commons, Chair of the Labour Party and Shadow Deputy Prime Minister. She is the longest continually serving female MP in history.

She was acting leader of the party for a short period of time when Gordon Brown resigned in 2010 and again when Ed Miliband resigned.

Pitch: Champion of the backbenchers and defender of Bercow’s reforms.

Likelihood:

Chris Bryant

Chris Bryant has put his name forward (Photo: Getty)

Party: Labour

Current position: Chairman of the House Finance Committee

Previous roles: The MP for the Rhondda since 2001 rose to become Deputy Leader of the House of Commons and then a Foreign Office minister under Gordon Brown.

He served as shadow Leader of the House of Commons in Jeremy Corbyn’s first shadow cabinet, but quit in June 2016 after the Brexit vote and voted for Owen Smith in the leadership challenge.

He originally trained to be a vicar, and, as a long-serving openly gay MP, was awarded Stonewall politician of the year in 2011.

Pitch: Limit PMQs to 30 minutes, tackle bullying and intimidation and champion backbenchers.

Likelihood: Has cross-party support

Dame Eleanor Laing

Tory MP Eleanor Laing (Getty)

Party: Conservative

Current position: Conservative MP for Epping Forest (since in 1997) and first Deputy Speaker

Previous roles: She has served on the Education and Employment Committee and was appointed as opposition Scottish spokeswoman.

She was embroiled in the MP’s expenses sandal after it emerged she had avoided paying £180,000 capital gains tax on the sale of her second home.

Pitch: Keen to highlight the need for a female Speaker and presenting herself as a change candidate

Likelihood: early Tory frontrunner.

Sir Edward Leigh

Sir Edward Leigh, Conservative MP for Gainsborough (Photo: Getty)

Party: Conservative

Current position: Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee

Previous roles: An MP since 1983. The veteran’s pitch is to be “rigidly impartial”.

Pitch: He said he would “submerge my personality into the office and be “rigidly impartial.”

Likelihood: Not a deputy speaker and a member of the governing party, a win would be counter to convention

Pete Wishart

Sir Edward Leigh Photo: UK Parliament)

Party: SNP

Current position: SNP’s shadow leader of the House of Commons and chair of the Scotland select committee.

Previous roles: The MP for Perth and North Perthshire (previously Tayside North before a constituency rearrangement) has been in the House of Commons since 2001, much longer than many of his Scottish Nationalist colleagues.

He has moved against the grain of SNP sentiment at times, saying in September 2017 that there should not be a second referendum on Scottish independence until after the 2021 assembly election.

Before politics, he was involved as a musician in bands including Big Country and Runrig. He won Parliamentary Tweeter of the Year.

Pitch: Pledges to move parliament around the UK, in the hope of appealing to non-London MPs.

Likelihood: May find a no from both sides

Dame Rosie Winterton

Dame Rosie Winterton Getty)

Party: Labour

Current position: Labour MP for Doncaster (since in 1997) and the second Deputy Speaker

Previous roles: She served as the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in the Lord Chancellor’s Department in 2001 and later was appointed a Minister of State at the Department for Health.

When she was made primarily responsible for dentistry, she oversaw the introduction of the new NHS dental contract of 2006.

She also serves as a minister in the Department for Transport, Minister for Yorkshire and the Department for Work and Pensions minister.

She was also caught up in the expenses row after being accused of using taxpayers money to soundproof the bedroom of her London flat.

In September 2010, she was elected to be Labour Chief Whip and served until October 2016.

Likelihood: Outside chance (undeclared)

Frank Field

Former Labour, now independent MP Frank Field [Photo: Getty]
Party: Independent, former Labour

Current position: Chairman of the Work and Pensions committee.

Previous roles: Minister for welfare reform under Tony Blair and an MP since 1979, Frank Field quit the Labour Party in 2018 after siding with the Government over Brexit and losing a confidence vote in his constituency, saying Labour was increasingly seen as “racist”.

A veteran at 77, with four decades’ service as an MP, selection as Speaker could help him retain his seat running against Labour in Birkenhead.

Likelihood: Possible but unlikely (undeclared)

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John Bercow to stand down as Speaker of the House of Commons on 31 October

House Speaker John Bercow has announced he will resign on 31 October unless an election is called before that date.

In an impassioned speech in the House of Commons, he said he had promised his wife and children that he would not stand in another election and that he intended to keep to that pledge.

Mr Bercow, who has been an MP for 22 years, was received with rapturous applause after he said being speaker had been “the greatest privilege and honour of my professional life for which I will be eternally grateful”.

“I wish my successor in the chair the very best fortune in standing up for the rights of honourable and right honourable members individually and for Parliament institutionally as the speaker of the House of Commons,” he said.

This story is being updated.

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Can Boris Johnson be impeached? How impeachment works in the UK – and is Plaid Cymru’s plan to remove the PM viable?

Boris Johnson is facing threats of impeachment from opposition MPs if he attempts to ignore new laws designed to force him to delay Brexit in order to avoid a no deal.

Plaid Cymru’s Westminster leader, Liz Saville Roberts, said opposition leaders should be ready to impeach the Prime Minister if he tries to ignore laws requiring him to seek another Brexit extension.

The new legislation, dubbed the Benn Bill after Labour MP Hilary Benn, is expected to gain royal assent today meaning the Prime Minister will have to write to the EU to request a three month delay if he cannot reach a deal.

But there are concerns that Mr Johnson, who said he is still determined to leave by the 31 October deadline, could attempt to find a way around the new laws.

Threats of impeachment

Ms Saville Roberts pointed out Mr Johnson backed an attempt in 2004 to impeach the then prime minister Tony Blair over the Iraq war and that he should face the same threat.

“Boris Johnson has already driven a bulldozer through the constitution, so no longer are ideas like impeachment far-fetched,” she said. “I will tell other opposition party leaders, we need to be ready to impeach Boris Johnson if he breaks the law,” she said.

“We cannot play the Prime Minister at his own cynical game. We need to be ready to fight fire with water, outsmart the smartest, think the unthinkable.

“No one is above the law, Boris Johnson shouldn’t risk finding that out the hard way.”

What does impeachment mean?

Impeachment is a method by which someone can be tried by Parliament for something like high treason or other misdemeanours that could be beyond the reach of the law or normal prosecution.

It is designed to be used, in particular, against government ministers but, according to Parliament’s website, the method is now “considered to be obsolete” and has not been adapted to be used in modern politics.

The exterior of the Houses of Parliament on January 21, 2019 (Getty Images)
Impeachment is not considered to be a modern political tool (Getty Images)

It is a procedure that is “directed in particular against Ministers of the Crown” – but the last recorded impeachment was in 1806.

Just one MP would have to make the accusation of “high crimes and misdemeanours” against a public official for the impeachment process to begin.

The Commons would then vote on an impeachment motion, which, if passed, could lead to prosecution and a trial which, historically, has taken place in Westminster Hall.

Could Mr Johnson be impeached?

Some ministers up until the 19th Century have underwent the trial, but no UK prime minister has ever successfully been impeached – despite attempts 15 years ago to bring a motion against Mr Blair.

Mr Johnson, when he was MP for Henley, was a supporter of impeaching Mr Blair during his time as prime minister over his decision to invade Iraq.

He wrote a comment for The Telegraph in which he accused Mr Blair of deliberately misleading Parliament and, as a result, called for MPs to support impeachment.

Former PM Tony Blair, pictured in 2004, faced unsuccessful attempts of impeachment over the Iraq ear (Photo: Getty)

Mr Johnson wrote at the time: “It is not so much that he lied (though many of his statements were at odds with reality): it is rather that he used all his lawyerly arts, and all the trust that is naturally reposed in his office, to communicate to the public a vast untruth.”

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Prorogation, general election vote and Royal Assent for the Brexit bill: Here’s what’s happening in Parliament today

He added: “The charge against Blair is that he wilfully misrepresented the facts to the Commons and to the country when we voted to go to war.[…] He treated Parliament and the public with contempt, and that is why he deserves to be impeached: that is, to be formally held to account…”

In November 2004 a motion was tabled in the Commons calling for Mr Blair to be impeached but it was never voted on because it was not supported by the three main parties.

It would have allowed MPs to debate whether they thought Mr Blair had lied to the house which is normally not allowed during Commons debates due to restrictions on Parliamentary language.

Although Mr Johnson could face legal action if he broke the law, this would most likely be carried out in the courts rather than using the rather archaic method of impeachment.

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Prorogation, general election vote and Royal Assent for the Brexit bill: Here’s everything happening in Parliament today

Boris Johnson will again ask MPs to back plans for an early election on Monday, saying that it is their “last chance” to put the decision about no-deal Brexit to a public vote.

Parliament is due to be suspended under the Prime Minister’s orders, meaning all Commons business is expected to be halted until 14 October, but Mr Johnson has now said MPs could avoid this by voting in favour of an early election.

Opposition MPs said they would not back an election until the new so-called Benn Bill has been enacted, however.

The new law, named after Labour MP Hilary Benn, would extend the Brexit deadline until January 2020 in order to block a no deal.

New law

MPs in the House of Commons Chamber for the debate and votes on the EU withdrawal and a general election. (Photo: PA)

The bill is expected to receive Royal Assent before prorogation kicks-in, but if Parliament is suspended immediately afterwards, MPs will be chucked out of the Commons.

Read more:

Foreign Secretary calls law blocking no-deal Brexit ‘lousy’ and says it will be taken to court

MPs are concerned as to whether the Prime Minister will actually obey the new legalisation or attempt to find a way around it.

Two-thirds of MPs have to agree to a call for an early general election using the Fixed-Term Parliament Act (FTPA).

Press Association reported a Government source saying Monday’s vote is “the last chance for Corbyn to be prime minister and negotiate his delay at Brussels (at the European Council summit) on 17-18 October”.

“If he opposes the people having their say in an election on 15 October, then MPs should realise they may not be able to stop no-deal.”

Monday is expected to be another crucial day in Parliament  (Photo: Getty Images)

Monday’s Commons agenda

MPs start at their usual Monday sitting time of 2.30 pm.

According to the Commons order paper MPs will begin with an hour of questions on education followed by any urgent ministerial statements.

Northern Ireland (Executive Formation) Act (Motion)

Once any ministerial statements are out the way MPs will debate five motions relating to Northern Ireland – with up to 90 minutes dedicated to each motion.

These debates are the outcome of former Attorney General Dominic Grieve’s plan to give MPs more Commons time to prevent a no-deal Brexit.

His amendment, which was voted through by a majority of just one, required the government to produce fortnightly reports into power-sharing.

Parliament renovation

MPs will then spend up to an hour to debating amendments to the Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill, which has returned to the Commons from the House of Lords.

The bill, which allows for major renovation works to parliament to progress, is expected to be given royal assent.

General election

The Government will then ask MPs to vote for the second time on whether to trigger an early general election.

They will debate for 90 minutes before voting. The motion is expected to be rejected after Opposition MPs agreed not to support another election at this stage.

They said that they want the new bill, aimed to prevent no-deal Brexit, to be implemented before signing off on another public vote.

Another rebellion?

The Times is reporting that, at this point, opposition MPs could again try and take over control of the Commons as they did last week.

This time their plan could be to try to force the Prime Minister to public documents that they say would refute his claim that the decision to prorogue parliament had nothing to do with Brexit.

They could request an emergency debate from the Speaker John Bercow after the general election motion.

Prorogation

Before this plan happens the Government could have moved its own motion to prorogue Parliament – which is listed next on the order paper after the motion for an early election.

MPs will debate petitions both opposing and supporting Mr Johnson’s radical move to suspend Parliament for five weeks ahead of the October 31 Brexit deadline.

One petition, calling for the suspension to be blocked, has garnered more than 1.7 million signatures.

But Mr Johnson is expected to push through with his plan to suspend Parliament if MPs do not fall in line on the issue of an early election.

The suspension of the house would be announced on behalf of the Queen and read out by Mr Bercow.

Once the two houses are officially prorogued they won’t reconvene until 14 October.

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Emily Thornberry says she would still vote to Remain even if Labour secured a Brexit deal

Emily Thornberry has said that if faced with the prospect of voting to stay in the EU and voting for a Brexit deal negotiated by Labour, she would still choose to Remain.

The shadow foreign secretary was asked on Question Time on Thursday night what Labour would do if elected into power. She said the party would negotiate a better deal with the EU, before putting it to a public vote.

But Ms Thornberry added that in that situation, she would still personally campaign to Remain ahead of another referendum, despite being part of the Labour cabinet responsible for agreeing such a deal.

Campaign against your own deal

She was asked by presenter Fiona Bruce: “You would go back to Europe, try to get a better deal then have a referendum where Remain is an option.

“Would you then campaign against your own deal?”

Emily Thornberry said that she would vote against any future Labor deal (Photo: Getty)

Ms Thornberry responded: “Personally I will campaign to remain. I will negotiate to the best of my ability a deal that will look after jobs and the economy.

“But the best way to look after jobs and the economy is to remain in the EU.”

Labour has previously agreed its Brexit policy is to put a new deal to the public in the form of another referendum, but MPs are torn as to whether support the deal or Remain.

Election decision

The party is now debating, with other opposition MPs, whether to support a Government motion next week calling for an early election.

Jeremy Corbyn is discussing whether to support an election with other opposition leaders (Photo: Getty Images)

Jeremy Corbyn has repeatedly called for an election but has said he will not now support one until no-deal Brexit has been completely ruled out.

He is due to hold a conference call with other opposition leaders on Friday morning to discuss the best way to prevent a no-deal Brexit and their approach to Boris Johnson’s latest bid to trigger a general election.

But, signalling that Labour will oppose the motion, Ms Thornberry told BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme that Mr Johnson is “as slippery as can be” and cannot be trusted not to use an election to distract the public while he pursues a no deal.

PM ‘can’t be trusted’

“If we vote to have a general election then, no matter what it is that Boris Johnson promises, it is up to him to advise the Queen when the general election should be,” she said.

“Given that he has shown himself to be a manifest liar and somebody who has said that he would ‘die in a ditch’ rather than stop no-deal […] our first priority has to be that we must stop no-deal and we must make sure that is going to happen.

Boris Johnson makes a speech during a visit to West Yorkshire (Photo: Danny Lawson/PA Wire/Pool/Reuters)

“We have a Prime Minister who is so unlike any other prime minister that we have had. In the past, if you passed a law you could be pretty sure the prime minister will abide by that law.

“But we heard from the Prime Minister’s own mouth that he will die in a ditch – obviously I hope he doesn’t, but I actually hope he would obey the law.”

The law she was referring to was a new bill, due to get royal assent in the next few days, which requires the prime minister to seek a three month Brexit extension if he cannot reach a deal with the EU by mid-October – essentially ruling out a no deal.

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What’s going on with Brexit? The week in politics summarised in less than 60 seconds

Monday – Election speculation and Downing Street threats

Monday: Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged MPs not to block a no deal (Photo: Getty)

The week kicked off with speculation Boris Johnson was preparing for a snap election after he threatened Tory MPs with deselection if they voted to block no deal and delay Brexit and then called an emergency cabinet meeting.

He later insisted he did not want an election but would not, under any circumstances, ask for another Brexit delay.

Tuesday – Holidays are over, bring on the rebellion

Tuesday: Phillip Lee defected from the Conservatives to the Liberal Democrats in the House of Commons chamber today (Photo: Reuters)

The next day MPs returned from summer recess to a vote on whether to give control of the Commons to backbenchers wanting to table anti-no deal legislation. 

The motion succeeded and, despite Mr Johnson’s threats, 21 Tory MPs voted in favour of it. They were chucked out the party and were banned from standing for re-election as Conservatives.

To add to the chaos, Tory MP Philip Lee quit the party, crossing the Commons floor as Mr Johnson spoke, to sit with the Liberal Democrats.

Wednesday – PMQs, spending reviews and backbench coups

Wednesday: Boris Johnson lost crucial votes (Photo: Reuters)

On Wednesday, day two of Commons drama continued with PMQs – the first since Mr Johnson took office – and the Spending Review.

Chancellor Sajid Javid announced funding for the NHS, social care and education – among other pledges – and said he was turning the tables on almost a decade of austerity.

But Labour accused him of “grubby electioneering” and warned the British public would not be fooled.

From 3pm backbenchers took over, tabling legislation to force the PM to delay Brexit for three months if he could not reach a deal, thus blocking a no deal.

After the bill cleared the Commons votes Mr Johnson tabled a motion for an election, arguing he could not govern without support for his key policy of no deal and daring MPs to put it back to the public.

The motion failed as Labour said they would only agree to it once the no-deal Brexit bill was passed into law.

Thursday – Sibling loyalty runs out

Thursday: Boris Johnson (R) pictured with his brother Jo Johnson, who has said he would be quitting (Getty Images)

On Thursday the Government conceded it would be passed and said it would be signed off by the Queen by Monday, after which the Prime Minister will table another motion for an election.

As Mr Johnson busied himself launching an election campaign, his own brother and cabinet minister Jo Johnson announced he was quitting politics because he could no longer handle the strain of juggling loyalty to family and the national interest.

Oh, and former Labour MP Luciana Berger quit Change UK and joined the Liberal Democrats.

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New vote on early election scheduled for Monday as time ticks down for poll before Brexit extension

The Government has confirmed it intends to ask MPs to vote again next week on whether to hold an early general election in a bid to squeeze it in before the Brexit deadline.

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, failed in his attempt to get an election approved in a vote on Wednesday night after Labour said it would not support a poll until no-deal Brexit was definitely ruled out.

But the Government is insisting that it is time for an election and Commons Leader Jacob Rees-Mogg announced a new motion relating to an early poll has been scheduled for consideration on Monday.

He also said that the prorogation of Parliament would not commence until a new anti-no deal bill has been passed into UK law.

New vote

Prime Minister Boris Johnson looking back towards his fellow Conservative MPs in the House of Commons Chamber during the debate and votes on the EU withdrawal and a general election. (Photo: PA)

Under the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act two-thirds of MPs will have to back the plan in order for an election to take place, but Labour is divided over how long to hold out before supporting an election.

There are concerns that Mr Johnson could repeal the newly-passed legislation – which forces him to seek an extension from the EU rather than pursue a no-deal Brexit – if he calls an election in October and wins it.

Labour is undecided on whether to support any election before the extension has actually secured with the EU, on top of passing into law.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell said: “We’re looking now at taking legal advice on how secure that Bill is, but we’re also consulting the other opposition parties and our own party on the date of a general election

Labour torn

“We’re desperate for a general election.”

But he said the party could not trust Mr Johnson and was “consulting about whether it’s better to go long, therefore, rather than to go short”.

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Could there still be an early election and how would it happen?

Mr Johnson, however, wants to hold an election before the EU summit on 17 October.

Announcing the business for next week, Mr Rees-Mogg said: “(There will be) a motion relating to an early parliamentary general election.

“The House will not adjourn until royal assent has been received to all acts. A message may be received from the Lords’ commissioner and I will return to the House on Monday with further information if necessary.”

During Wednesday’s vote Mr Johnson received 298 votes for the election, with 56 against – nowhere near the two-thirds – 434 votes – required.

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Jo Johnson: Boris Johnson’s brother quits over being ‘torn between family loyalty and the national interest’

Boris Johnson’s brother, Jo Johnson, has announced he is resigning from Government and will step down as an MP citing conflict between being loyal to his brother, the Prime Minister, and what is best for the country.

The MP for Orpington said he had been struggling with “unresolvable tension” between “family loyalty and the national interest”.

And he said, as a result, he could no longer carry on as an MP in the House of Commons.

The announcement came at a crucial time for Mr Johnson, who has already lost almost two dozen Tory MPs this week after they rebelled against him.

“It’s been an honour to represent Orpington for 9 years  and to serve as a minister under three PMs,” Jo Johnson tweeted.

“In recent weeks I’ve been torn between family loyalty and the national interest – it’s an unresolvable tension & time for others to take on my roles as MP & Minister.”

This is a developing story.

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Will there a be a general election? How Boris Johnson could still get a 2019 snap election and when it could be

Boris Johnson is ramping up calls for Jeremy Corbyn to get behind his plan for an early general election after failing in his effort to call a poll on Wednesday night.

MPs decided not to support an early election in the crucial vote after the Prime Minister was accused of using the poll to shut down parliament and avoid plans to block a no deal.

The Commons is torn as to if and when an election should take place but an early poll is certainly not ruled out – and could still be called as early as in the next few days.

Update on where we are currently at:

On Wednesday night MPs approved legislation which, if fully passed, will prevent a no-deal Brexit by instead requiring Mr Johnson to agree a deal with the EU by mid-October or ask for another extension.

The legislation scuppers Mr Johnson’s key “do or die” commitment to leave the EU by 31 October and could end up forcing him to delay Brexit by at least another three months.

He really does not want to do this because his willingness to leave the EU without a deal has been central to his policy framework as Prime Minister and being forced to go to the EU to seek a delay would undermine his promise to Brexiteers.

Boris Johnson said he now things an election should be held immediately (Photo: ITV)

So how did this then lead to election talk?

The Government’s attitude on this is that keeping a no-deal Brexit on the table is a key policy and, if it is stopped from doing this, it cannot move forward with its EU strategy and, essentially, move on from Brexit.

Mr Johnson said that if he could not get MPs to back his EU policy then it was time to put the choice back to the public in the form of an election. This is despite him saying a few days ago that he did not want an election.

He tabled a motion for an early election which he would want to take place in mid-October – before the 31 October Brexit deadline – which would mean if he wonhe would still have the power to take the UK out of the EU without a deal.

But the election motion failed…

The motion did not pass because it did not get the the support of two-thirds of MPs – which is required under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act.

Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour, along with other opposition MPs, refused to back the request and abstained from the vote.

Jeremy Corbyn was accused of being ‘scared’ by Tory MPs – but refused to support an immediate election (Photo: Reuters)

He said that he did want an election but would not support one until the legislation to stop a no deal has been cemented in UK law so any future prime minister could not spring a no-deal Brexit on the country.

Mr Corbyn said that Mr Johnson was only calling an election in order to suspend Parliament and avoid the scrutiny of MPs.

Could there still be an early election?

Yes. Mr Johnson could try another route to calling an election by holding another vote on the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act after the Bill is formally approved – which could be the case by early next week.

Parliament must be dissolved 25 working days before an election date which means that, in order for Mr Johnson to achieve his preferred timetable and have an election in the middle of October, it would have to be called early next week.

If the law is approved by then, Labour could be prepared to support an election.

Boris Johnson has lost a number of votes in the early days of his premiership (Photo: Reuters)

But the concerns among some in the Labour party are that the Government cannot be trusted and many think that Mr Corbyn should wait until a formal request for extension has been made to Brussels before agreeing to an election.

It appears to be a game of chicken between Government and opposition parties – with Mr Johnson trying to lay a trap for Labour that could save his no-deal agenda and Mr Corbyn trying to block a no deal whilst still securing an election.

The other way that an election could be called is if Mr Corbyn called a vote of no-confidence in the Government.

This would require the backing of a simple majority of MPs and no new administration being formed in 14 days before the public get their say.

When would the election be?

The Prime Minister wants it to be held on 15 October so the victor can attend the EU Council summit where a last ditch deal could be secured.

Labour is yet to state when it wants a vote, other than to say it must be after no-deal is taken off the table.

It is not clear whether this means it would prefer for an election to be held after the exit date – once an extension is formally in place – or once the legislation has been passed.

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How did my MP vote last night? Results in full for no-deal Brexit bill and snap general election votes

The Prime Minister lost another crucial Brexit vote on Wednesday night after MPs approved a bill that, if passed in full, will legally block a no deal. 

The backbench bill, supported by the opposition parties, requires Boris Johnson to seek another extension from the EU if he does not agree a deal by the middle of October.

It passed its third reading by a majority of 28 despite being vehemently opposed by the Government.

Mr Johnson responded to the result by saying there “must” be an early general election but, with opposition MPs refusing to back it until a no deal has definitely been ruled out, his motion failed to win enough support.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson looking back towards his fellow Conservative MPs in the House of Commons Chamber during the debate and votes on the EU withdrawal and a general election. (Photo: PA)

How did my MP vote on blocking no-deal Brexit?

Result: The bill passed with a majority of 28.

MPs who voted yes

Diane Abbott (Labour – Hackney North and Stoke Newington)
Debbie Abrahams (Labour – Oldham East and Saddleworth)
Rushanara Ali (Labour – Bethnal Green and Bow)
Heidi Allen (Independent – South Cambridgeshire)
Rosena Allin-Khan (Labour – Tooting)
Mike Amesbury (Labour – Weaver Vale)
Tonia Antoniazzi (Labour – Gower)
Jonathan Ashworth (Labour – Leicester South)
Adrian Bailey (Labour – West Bromwich West)
Hannah Bardell (Scottish National Party – Livingston)
Kevin Barron (Labour – Rother Valley)
Guto Bebb (Independent – Aberconwy)
Margaret Beckett (Labour – Derby South)
Hilary Benn (Labour – Leeds Central)
Richard Benyon (Independent – Newbury)
Luciana Berger (Independent – Liverpool, Wavertree)
Clive Betts (Labour – Sheffield South East)
Mhairi Black (Scottish National Party – Paisley and Renfrewshire South)
Ian Blackford (Scottish National Party – Ross, Skye and Lochaber)
Kirsty Blackman (Scottish National Party – Aberdeen North)
Roberta Blackman-Woods (Labour – City of Durham)
Paul Blomfield (Labour – Sheffield Central)
Nick Boles (Independent – Grantham and Stamford)
Tracy Brabin (Labour – Batley and Spen)
Ben Bradshaw (Labour – Exeter)
Tom Brake (Liberal Democrat – Carshalton and Wallington)
Kevin Brennan (Labour – Cardiff West)
Steve Brine (Independent – Winchester)
Deidre Brock (Scottish National Party – Edinburgh North and Leith)
Alan Brown (Scottish National Party – Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Lyn Brown (Labour – West Ham)
Nicholas Brown (Labour – Newcastle upon Tyne East)
Chris Bryant (Labour – Rhondda)
Karen Buck (Labour – Westminster North)
Richard Burden (Labour – Birmingham, Northfield)
Richard Burgon (Labour – Leeds East)
Alistair Burt (Independent – North East Bedfordshire)
Dawn Butler (Labour – Brent Central)
Liam Byrne (Labour – Birmingham, Hodge Hill)
Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat – Twickenham)
Ruth Cadbury (Labour – Brentford and Isleworth)
Lisa Cameron (Scottish National Party – East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow)
Alan Campbell (Labour – Tynemouth)
Dan Carden (Labour – Liverpool, Walton)
Alistair Carmichael (Liberal Democrat – Orkney and Shetland)
Sarah Champion (Labour – Rotherham)
Douglas Chapman (Scottish National Party – Dunfermline and West Fife)
Jenny Chapman (Labour – Darlington)
Bambos Charalambous (Labour – Enfield, Southgate)
Joanna Cherry (Scottish National Party – Edinburgh South West)
Greg Clark (Independent – Tunbridge Wells)
Kenneth Clarke (Independent – Rushcliffe)
Vernon Coaker (Labour – Gedling)
Ann Coffey (The Independent Group for Change – Stockport)
Julie Cooper (Labour – Burnley)
Rosie Cooper (Labour – West Lancashire)
Yvette Cooper (Labour – Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford)
Jeremy Corbyn (Labour – Islington North)
Ronnie Cowan (Scottish National Party – Inverclyde)
Neil Coyle (Labour – Bermondsey and Old Southwark)
David Crausby (Labour – Bolton North East)
Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party – Lanark and Hamilton East)
Mary Creagh (Labour – Wakefield)
Stella Creasy (Labour – Walthamstow)
Jon Cruddas (Labour – Dagenham and Rainham)
John Cryer (Labour – Leyton and Wanstead)
Judith Cummins (Labour – Bradford South)
Alex Cunningham (Labour – Stockton North)
Jim Cunningham (Labour – Coventry South)
Janet Daby (Labour – Lewisham East)
Nic Dakin (Labour – Scunthorpe)
Edward Davey (Liberal Democrat – Kingston and Surbiton)
Wayne David (Labour – Caerphilly)
Geraint Davies (Labour – Swansea West)
Martyn Day (Scottish National Party – Linlithgow and East Falkirk)
Marsha De Cordova (Labour – Battersea)
Gloria De Piero (Labour – Ashfield)
Thangam Debbonaire (Labour – Bristol West)
Emma Dent Coad (Labour – Kensington)
Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (Labour – Slough)
Martin Docherty-Hughes (Scottish National Party – West Dunbartonshire)
Anneliese Dodds (Labour – Oxford East)
Jane Dodds (Liberal Democrat – Brecon and Radnorshire)
Stephen Doughty (Labour – Cardiff South and Penarth)
Peter Dowd (Labour – Bootle)
David Drew (Labour – Stroud)
Jack Dromey (Labour – Birmingham, Erdington)
Rosie Duffield (Labour – Canterbury)
Maria Eagle (Labour – Garston and Halewood)
Angela Eagle (Labour – Wallasey)
Jonathan Edwards (Plaid Cymru – Carmarthen East and Dinefwr)
Clive Efford (Labour – Eltham)
Julie Elliott (Labour – Sunderland Central)
Louise Ellman (Labour – Liverpool, Riverside)
Chris Elmore (Labour – Ogmore)
Bill Esterson (Labour – Sefton Central)
Chris Evans (Labour – Islwyn)
Paul Farrelly (Labour – Newcastle-under-Lyme)
Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat – Westmorland and Lonsdale)
Marion Fellows (Scottish National Party – Motherwell and Wishaw)
Frank Field (Independent – Birkenhead)
Jim Fitzpatrick (Labour – Poplar and Limehouse)
Colleen Fletcher (Labour – Coventry North East)
Caroline Flint (Labour – Don Valley)
Lisa Forbes (Labour – Peterborough)
Yvonne Fovargue (Labour – Makerfield)
Vicky Foxcroft (Labour – Lewisham, Deptford)
James Frith (Labour – Bury North)
Gill Furniss (Labour – Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough)
Hugh Gaffney (Labour – Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill)
Mike Gapes (The Independent Group for Change – Ilford South)
Barry Gardiner (Labour – Brent North)
David Gauke (Independent – South West Hertfordshire)
Ruth George (Labour – High Peak)
Stephen Gethins (Scottish National Party – North East Fife)
Patricia Gibson (Scottish National Party – North Ayrshire and Arran)
Preet Kaur Gill (Labour – Birmingham, Edgbaston)
Mary Glindon (Labour – North Tyneside)
Roger Godsiff (Labour – Birmingham, Hall Green)
Helen Goodman (Labour – Bishop Auckland)
Patrick Grady (Scottish National Party – Glasgow North)
Peter Grant (Scottish National Party – Glenrothes)
Neil Gray (Scottish National Party – Airdrie and Shotts)
Kate Green (Labour – Stretford and Urmston)
Justine Greening (Independent – Putney)
Lilian Greenwood (Labour – Nottingham South)
Margaret Greenwood (Labour – Wirral West)
Dominic Grieve (Independent – Beaconsfield)
Nia Griffith (Labour – Llanelli)
John Grogan (Labour – Keighley)
Andrew Gwynne (Labour – Denton and Reddish)
Sam Gyimah (Independent – East Surrey)
Louise Haigh (Labour – Sheffield, Heeley)
Fabian Hamilton (Labour – Leeds North East)
Philip Hammond (Independent – Runnymede and Weybridge)
Stephen Hammond (Independent – Wimbledon)
David Hanson (Labour – Delyn)
Emma Hardy (Labour – Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Harriet Harman (Labour – Camberwell and Peckham)
Richard Harrington (Independent – Watford)
Carolyn Harris (Labour – Swansea East)
Helen Hayes (Labour – Dulwich and West Norwood)
Sue Hayman (Labour – Workington)
John Healey (Labour – Wentworth and Dearne)
Mark Hendrick (Labour – Preston)
Drew Hendry (Scottish National Party – Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey)
Lady Hermon (Independent – North Down)
Mike Hill (Labour – Hartlepool)
Meg Hillier (Labour – Hackney South and Shoreditch)
Wera Hobhouse (Liberal Democrat – Bath)
Margaret Hodge (Labour – Barking)
Sharon Hodgson (Labour – Washington and Sunderland West)
Kate Hollern (Labour – Blackburn)
Stewart Hosie (Scottish National Party – Dundee East)
George Howarth (Labour – Knowsley)
Rupa Huq (Labour – Ealing Central and Acton)
Imran Hussain (Labour – Bradford East)
Margot James (Independent – Stourbridge)
Christine Jardine (Liberal Democrat – Edinburgh West)
Dan Jarvis (Labour – Barnsley Central)
Diana Johnson (Labour – Kingston upon Hull North)
Darren Jones (Labour – Bristol North West)
Gerald Jones (Labour – Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney)
Graham P Jones (Labour – Hyndburn)
Helen Jones (Labour – Warrington North)
Kevan Jones (Labour – North Durham)
Ruth Jones (Labour – Newport West)
Sarah Jones (Labour – Croydon Central)
Susan Elan Jones (Labour – Clwyd South)
Mike Kane (Labour – Wythenshawe and Sale East)
Barbara Keeley (Labour – Worsley and Eccles South)
Liz Kendall (Labour – Leicester West)
Afzal Khan (Labour – Manchester, Gorton)
Ged Killen (Labour – Rutherglen and Hamilton West)
Stephen Kinnock (Labour – Aberavon)
Peter Kyle (Labour – Hove)
Lesley Laird (Labour – Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath)
Ben Lake (Plaid Cymru – Ceredigion)
Norman Lamb (Liberal Democrat – North Norfolk)
David Lammy (Labour – Tottenham)
Ian Lavery (Labour – Wansbeck)
Chris Law (Scottish National Party – Dundee West)
Phillip Lee (Liberal Democrat – Bracknell)
Karen Lee (Labour – Lincoln)
Chris Leslie (The Independent Group for Change – Nottingham East)
Oliver Letwin (Independent – West Dorset)
Emma Lewell-Buck (Labour – South Shields)
Clive Lewis (Labour – Norwich South)
David Linden (Scottish National Party – Glasgow East)
Stephen Lloyd (Independent – Eastbourne)
Tony Lloyd (Labour – Rochdale)
Rebecca Long Bailey (Labour – Salford and Eccles)
Caroline Lucas (Green Party – Brighton, Pavilion)
Ian C. Lucas (Labour – Wrexham)
Holly Lynch (Labour – Halifax)
Angus Brendan MacNeil (Scottish National Party – Na h-Eileanan an Iar)
Justin Madders (Labour – Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Khalid Mahmood (Labour – Birmingham, Perry Barr)
Shabana Mahmood (Labour – Birmingham, Ladywood)
Seema Malhotra (Labour – Feltham and Heston)
Gordon Marsden (Labour – Blackpool South)
Sandy Martin (Labour – Ipswich)
Rachael Maskell (Labour – York Central)
Christian Matheson (Labour – City of Chester)
Steve McCabe (Labour – Birmingham, Selly Oak)
Kerry McCarthy (Labour – Bristol East)
Siobhain McDonagh (Labour – Mitcham and Morden)
Andy McDonald (Labour – Middlesbrough)
Stewart Malcolm McDonald (Scottish National Party – Glasgow South)
Stuart C. McDonald (Scottish National Party – Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
John McDonnell (Labour – Hayes and Harlington)
Pat McFadden (Labour – Wolverhampton South East)
Conor McGinn (Labour – St Helens North)
Alison McGovern (Labour – Wirral South)
Liz McInnes (Labour – Heywood and Middleton)
Catherine McKinnell (Labour – Newcastle upon Tyne North)
Jim McMahon (Labour – Oldham West and Royton)
Anna McMorrin (Labour – Cardiff North)
John McNally (Scottish National Party – Falkirk)
Ian Mearns (Labour – Gateshead)
Edward Miliband (Labour – Doncaster North)
Anne Milton (Independent – Guildford)
Carol Monaghan (Scottish National Party – Glasgow North West)
Madeleine Moon (Labour – Bridgend)
Layla Moran (Liberal Democrat – Oxford West and Abingdon)
Jessica Morden (Labour – Newport East)
Stephen Morgan (Labour – Portsmouth South)
Grahame Morris (Labour – Easington)
Ian Murray (Labour – Edinburgh South)
Lisa Nandy (Labour – Wigan)
Gavin Newlands (Scottish National Party – Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
Alex Norris (Labour – Nottingham North)
Brendan O’Hara (Scottish National Party – Argyll and Bute)
Melanie Onn (Labour – Great Grimsby)
Chi Onwurah (Labour – Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Kate Osamor (Labour – Edmonton)
Albert Owen (Labour – Ynys M?n)
Stephanie Peacock (Labour – Barnsley East)
Teresa Pearce (Labour – Erith and Thamesmead)
Matthew Pennycook (Labour – Greenwich and Woolwich)
Toby Perkins (Labour – Chesterfield)
Jess Phillips (Labour – Birmingham, Yardley)
Bridget Phillipson (Labour – Houghton and Sunderland South)
Laura Pidcock (Labour – North West Durham)
Jo Platt (Labour – Leigh)
Luke Pollard (Labour – Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport)
Stephen Pound (Labour – Ealing North)
Lucy Powell (Labour – Manchester Central)
Yasmin Qureshi (Labour – Bolton South East)
Faisal Rashid (Labour – Warrington South)
Angela Rayner (Labour – Ashton-under-Lyne)
Steve Reed (Labour – Croydon North)
Christina Rees (Labour – Neath)
Ellie Reeves (Labour – Lewisham West and Penge)
Rachel Reeves (Labour – Leeds West)
Emma Reynolds (Labour – Wolverhampton North East) (Proxy vote cast by Pat McFadden)
Jonathan Reynolds (Labour – Stalybridge and Hyde)
Marie Rimmer (Labour – St Helens South and Whiston)
Geoffrey Robinson (Labour – Coventry North West)
Matt Rodda (Labour – Reading East)
Danielle Rowley (Labour – Midlothian)
Chris Ruane (Labour – Vale of Clwyd)
Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Labour – Brighton, Kemptown)
Joan Ryan (The Independent Group for Change – Enfield North)
Antoinette Sandbach (Independent – Eddisbury)
Liz Saville Roberts (Plaid Cymru – Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Naz Shah (Labour – Bradford West)
Virendra Sharma (Labour – Ealing, Southall)
Barry Sheerman (Labour – Huddersfield)
Tommy Sheppard (Scottish National Party – Edinburgh East)
Paula Sherriff (Labour – Dewsbury)
Gavin Shuker (Independent – Luton South)
Tulip Siddiq (Labour – Hampstead and Kilburn)
Dennis Skinner (Labour – Bolsover)
Andy Slaughter (Labour – Hammersmith)
Ruth Smeeth (Labour – Stoke-on-Trent North)
Angela Smith (Independent – Penistone and Stocksbridge)
Cat Smith (Labour – Lancaster and Fleetwood)
Eleanor Smith (Labour – Wolverhampton South West)
Laura Smith (Labour – Crewe and Nantwich)
Owen Smith (Labour – Pontypridd)
Karin Smyth (Labour – Bristol South)
Gareth Snell (Labour – Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Nicholas Soames (Independent – Mid Sussex)
Alex Sobel (Labour – Leeds North West)
Anna Soubry (The Independent Group for Change – Broxtowe)
John Spellar (Labour – Warley)
Caroline Spelman (Conservative – Meriden)
Keir Starmer (Labour – Holborn and St Pancras)
Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party – Glasgow South West)
Jo Stevens (Labour – Cardiff Central)
Rory Stewart (Independent – Penrith and The Border)
Jamie Stone (Liberal Democrat – Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross)
Wes Streeting (Labour – Ilford North)
Graham Stringer (Labour – Blackley and Broughton)
Paul Sweeney (Labour – Glasgow North East)
Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat – East Dunbartonshire)
Mark Tami (Labour – Alyn and Deeside)
Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party – Glasgow Central)
Gareth Thomas (Labour – Harrow West)
Nick Thomas-Symonds (Labour – Torfaen)
Emily Thornberry (Labour – Islington South and Finsbury)
Stephen Timms (Labour – East Ham)
Jon Trickett (Labour – Hemsworth)
Anna Turley (Labour – Redcar)
Karl Turner (Labour – Kingston upon Hull East)
Stephen Twigg (Labour – Liverpool, West Derby)
Liz Twist (Labour – Blaydon)
Chuka Umunna (Liberal Democrat – Streatham)
Edward Vaizey (Independent – Wantage)
Keith Vaz (Labour – Leicester East)
Valerie Vaz (Labour – Walsall South)
Thelma Walker (Labour – Colne Valley)
Tom Watson (Labour – West Bromwich East)
Catherine West (Labour – Hornsey and Wood Green)
Matt Western (Labour – Warwick and Leamington)
Alan Whitehead (Labour – Southampton, Test)
Martin Whitfield (Labour – East Lothian)
Philippa Whitford (Scottish National Party – Central Ayrshire)
Paul Williams (Labour – Stockton South)
Hywel Williams (Plaid Cymru – Arfon)
Phil Wilson (Labour – Sedgefield)
Pete Wishart (Scottish National Party – Perth and North Perthshire)
Sarah Wollaston (Liberal Democrat – Totnes)
John Woodcock (Independent – Barrow and Furness)
Mohammad Yasin (Labour – Bedford)
Daniel Zeichner (Labour – Cambridge)

MPs who voted no

Nigel Adams (Conservative – Selby and Ainsty)
Bim Afolami (Conservative – Hitchin and Harpenden)
Adam Afriyie (Conservative – Windsor)
Peter Aldous (Conservative – Waveney)
Lucy Allan (Conservative – Telford)
David Amess (Conservative – Southend West)
Edward Argar (Conservative – Charnwood)
Victoria Atkins (Conservative – Louth and Horncastle)
Ian Austin (Independent – Dudley North)
Richard Bacon (Conservative – South Norfolk)
Kemi Badenoch (Conservative – Saffron Walden)
Steve Baker (Conservative – Wycombe)
Harriett Baldwin (Conservative – West Worcestershire)
Stephen Barclay (Conservative – North East Cambridgeshire)
John Baron (Conservative – Basildon and Billericay)
Henry Bellingham (Conservative – North West Norfolk)
Paul Beresford (Conservative – Mole Valley)
Jake Berry (Conservative – Rossendale and Darwen)
Bob Blackman (Conservative – Harrow East)
Crispin Blunt (Conservative – Reigate)
Peter Bone (Conservative – Wellingborough)
Peter Bottomley (Conservative – Worthing West)
Andrew Bowie (Conservative – West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine)
Ben Bradley (Conservative – Mansfield)
Karen Bradley (Conservative – Staffordshire Moorlands)
Graham Brady (Conservative – Altrincham and Sale West)
Suella Braverman (Conservative – Fareham) (Proxy vote cast by Steve Baker)
Jack Brereton (Conservative – Stoke-on-Trent South)
Andrew Bridgen (Conservative – North West Leicestershire)
James Brokenshire (Conservative – Old Bexley and Sidcup)
Fiona Bruce (Conservative – Congleton)
Robert Buckland (Conservative – South Swindon)
Alex Burghart (Conservative – Brentwood and Ongar)
Conor Burns (Conservative – Bournemouth West)
Alun Cairns (Conservative – Vale of Glamorgan)
Gregory Campbell (Democratic Unionist Party – East Londonderry)
James Cartlidge (Conservative – South Suffolk)
William Cash (Conservative – Stone)
Maria Caulfield (Conservative – Lewes)
Alex Chalk (Conservative – Cheltenham)
Rehman Chishti (Conservative – Gillingham and Rainham)
Christopher Chope (Conservative – Christchurch)
Jo Churchill (Conservative – Bury St Edmunds)
Colin Clark (Conservative – Gordon)
Simon Clarke (Conservative – Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)
James Cleverly (Conservative – Braintree)
Geoffrey Clifton-Brown (Conservative – The Cotswolds)
Th?r?se Coffey (Conservative – Suffolk Coastal)
Damian Collins (Conservative – Folkestone and Hythe)
Alberto Costa (Conservative – South Leicestershire)
Robert Courts (Conservative – Witney)
Geoffrey Cox (Conservative – Torridge and West Devon)
Stephen Crabb (Conservative – Preseli Pembrokeshire)
Tracey Crouch (Conservative – Chatham and Aylesford)
David T. C. Davies (Conservative – Monmouth)
Glyn Davies (Conservative – Montgomeryshire)
Mims Davies (Conservative – Eastleigh)
Philip Davies (Conservative – Shipley)
David Davis (Conservative – Haltemprice and Howden)
Caroline Dinenage (Conservative – Gosport)
Jonathan Djanogly (Conservative – Huntingdon)
Leo Docherty (Conservative – Aldershot)
Nigel Dodds (Democratic Unionist Party – Belfast North)
Jeffrey M. Donaldson (Democratic Unionist Party – Lagan Valley)
Michelle Donelan (Conservative – Chippenham)
Nadine Dorries (Conservative – Mid Bedfordshire)
Steve Double (Conservative – St Austell and Newquay)
Oliver Dowden (Conservative – Hertsmere)
Jackie Doyle-Price (Conservative – Thurrock)
Richard Drax (Conservative – South Dorset)
James Duddridge (Conservative – Rochford and Southend East)
David Duguid (Conservative – Banff and Buchan)
Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative – Chingford and Woodford Green)
Alan Duncan (Conservative – Rutland and Melton)
Philip Dunne (Conservative – Ludlow)
Michael Ellis (Conservative – Northampton North)
Tobias Ellwood (Conservative – Bournemouth East)
Charlie Elphicke (Independent – Dover)
George Eustice (Conservative – Camborne and Redruth)
Nigel Evans (Conservative – Ribble Valley)
David Evennett (Conservative – Bexleyheath and Crayford)
Michael Fabricant (Conservative – Lichfield)
Michael Fallon (Conservative – Sevenoaks)
Mark Field (Conservative – Cities of London and Westminster)
Vicky Ford (Conservative – Chelmsford)
Kevin Foster (Conservative – Torbay)
Liam Fox (Conservative – North Somerset)
Mark Francois (Conservative – Rayleigh and Wickford)
Lucy Frazer (Conservative – South East Cambridgeshire)
George Freeman (Conservative – Mid Norfolk)
Mike Freer (Conservative – Finchley and Golders Green)
Marcus Fysh (Conservative – Yeovil)
Roger Gale (Conservative – North Thanet)
Mark Garnier (Conservative – Wyre Forest)
Nusrat Ghani (Conservative – Wealden)
Nick Gibb (Conservative – Bognor Regis and Littlehampton)
Cheryl Gillan (Conservative – Chesham and Amersham)
Paul Girvan (Democratic Unionist Party – South Antrim)
John Glen (Conservative – Salisbury)
Zac Goldsmith (Conservative – Richmond Park)
Robert Goodwill (Conservative – Scarborough and Whitby)
Michael Gove (Conservative – Surrey Heath)
Luke Graham (Conservative – Ochil and South Perthshire)
Richard Graham (Conservative – Gloucester)
Bill Grant (Conservative – Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock)
Helen Grant (Conservative – Maidstone and The Weald)
James Gray (Conservative – North Wiltshire)
Chris Grayling (Conservative – Epsom and Ewell)
Chris Green (Conservative – Bolton West)
Damian Green (Conservative – Ashford)
Andrew Griffiths (Conservative – Burton)
Kirstene Hair (Conservative – Angus)
Robert Halfon (Conservative – Harlow)
Luke Hall (Conservative – Thornbury and Yate)
Matt Hancock (Conservative – West Suffolk)
Greg Hands (Conservative – Chelsea and Fulham)
Mark Harper (Conservative – Forest of Dean)
Rebecca Harris (Conservative – Castle Point)
Trudy Harrison (Conservative – Copeland)
Simon Hart (Conservative – Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire)
John Hayes (Conservative – South Holland and The Deepings)
Oliver Heald (Conservative – North East Hertfordshire)
James Heappey (Conservative – Wells)
Chris Heaton-Harris (Conservative – Daventry)
Peter Heaton-Jones (Conservative – North Devon)
Gordon Henderson (Conservative – Sittingbourne and Sheppey)
Nick Herbert (Conservative – Arundel and South Downs)
Damian Hinds (Conservative – East Hampshire)
Simon Hoare (Conservative – North Dorset)
Kate Hoey (Labour – Vauxhall)
George Hollingbery (Conservative – Meon Valley)
Kevin Hollinrake (Conservative – Thirsk and Malton)
Philip Hollobone (Conservative – Kettering)
Adam Holloway (Conservative – Gravesham)
John Howell (Conservative – Henley)
Nigel Huddleston (Conservative – Mid Worcestershire)
Eddie Hughes (Conservative – Walsall North)
Jeremy Hunt (Conservative – South West Surrey)
Nick Hurd (Conservative – Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner)
Alister Jack (Conservative – Dumfries and Galloway)
Sajid Javid (Conservative – Bromsgrove)
Ranil Jayawardena (Conservative – North East Hampshire)
Bernard Jenkin (Conservative – Harwich and North Essex)
Andrea Jenkyns (Conservative – Morley and Outwood)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative – Newark)
Boris Johnson (Conservative – Uxbridge and South Ruislip)
Caroline Johnson (Conservative – Sleaford and North Hykeham)
Gareth Johnson (Conservative – Dartford)
Joseph Johnson (Conservative – Orpington)
Andrew Jones (Conservative – Harrogate and Knaresborough)
David Jones (Conservative – Clwyd West)
Marcus Jones (Conservative – Nuneaton)
Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative – Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Gillian Keegan (Conservative – Chichester)
Seema Kennedy (Conservative – South Ribble)
Stephen Kerr (Conservative – Stirling)
Julian Knight (Conservative – Solihull)
Greg Knight (Conservative – East Yorkshire)
Kwasi Kwarteng (Conservative – Spelthorne)
John Lamont (Conservative – Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk)
Mark Lancaster (Conservative – Milton Keynes North)
Pauline Latham (Conservative – Mid Derbyshire)
Andrea Leadsom (Conservative – South Northamptonshire)
Jeremy Lefroy (Conservative – Stafford)
Edward Leigh (Conservative – Gainsborough)
Andrew Lewer (Conservative – Northampton South)
Brandon Lewis (Conservative – Great Yarmouth)
Julian Lewis (Conservative – New Forest East)
Ivan Lewis (Independent – Bury South)
Ian Liddell-Grainger (Conservative – Bridgwater and West Somerset)
David Lidington (Conservative – Aylesbury)
Emma Little Pengelly (Democratic Unionist Party – Belfast South)
Julia Lopez (Conservative – Hornchurch and Upminster)
Jack Lopresti (Conservative – Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Jonathan Lord (Conservative – Woking)
Tim Loughton (Conservative – East Worthing and Shoreham)
Craig Mackinlay (Conservative – South Thanet)
Rachel Maclean (Conservative – Redditch)
Anne Main (Conservative – St Albans)
Alan Mak (Conservative – Havant)
Kit Malthouse (Conservative – North West Hampshire)
Scott Mann (Conservative – North Cornwall)
Paul Masterton (Conservative – East Renfrewshire)
Theresa May (Conservative – Maidenhead)
Paul Maynard (Conservative – Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Patrick McLoughlin (Conservative – Derbyshire Dales)
Stephen McPartland (Conservative – Stevenage)
Esther McVey (Conservative – Tatton)
Mark Menzies (Conservative – Fylde)
Johnny Mercer (Conservative – Plymouth, Moor View)
Huw Merriman (Conservative – Bexhill and Battle)
Stephen Metcalfe (Conservative – South Basildon and East Thurrock)
Maria Miller (Conservative – Basingstoke)
Amanda Milling (Conservative – Cannock Chase)
Nigel Mills (Conservative – Amber Valley)
Andrew Mitchell (Conservative – Sutton Coldfield)
Damien Moore (Conservative – Southport)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative – Portsmouth North)
Nicky Morgan (Conservative – Loughborough)
Anne Marie Morris (Conservative – Newton Abbot)
David Morris (Conservative – Morecambe and Lunesdale)
James Morris (Conservative – Halesowen and Rowley Regis)
Wendy Morton (Conservative – Aldridge-Brownhills)
David Mundell (Conservative – Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale)
Sheryll Murray (Conservative – South East Cornwall)
Andrew Murrison (Conservative – South West Wiltshire)
Robert Neill (Conservative – Bromley and Chislehurst)
Sarah Newton (Conservative – Truro and Falmouth)
Jesse Norman (Conservative – Hereford and South Herefordshire)
Neil O’Brien (Conservative – Harborough)
Matthew Offord (Conservative – Hendon)
Guy Opperman (Conservative – Hexham)
Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist Party – North Antrim)
Neil Parish (Conservative – Tiverton and Honiton)
Priti Patel (Conservative – Witham)
Owen Paterson (Conservative – North Shropshire)
Mark Pawsey (Conservative – Rugby)
Mike Penning (Conservative – Hemel Hempstead)
John Penrose (Conservative – Weston-super-Mare)
Andrew Percy (Conservative – Brigg and Goole)
Claire Perry (Conservative – Devizes)
Chris Philp (Conservative – Croydon South)
Christopher Pincher (Conservative – Tamworth)
Dan Poulter (Conservative – Central Suffolk and North Ipswich)
Rebecca Pow (Conservative – Taunton Deane)
Victoria Prentis (Conservative – Banbury)
Mark Prisk (Conservative – Hertford and Stortford)
Mark Pritchard (Conservative – The Wrekin)
Tom Pursglove (Conservative – Corby)
Jeremy Quin (Conservative – Horsham)
Will Quince (Conservative – Colchester)
Dominic Raab (Conservative – Esher and Walton)
John Redwood (Conservative – Wokingham)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative – North East Somerset)
Laurence Robertson (Conservative – Tewkesbury)
Gavin Robinson (Democratic Unionist Party – Belfast East)
Mary Robinson (Conservative – Cheadle)
Andrew Rosindell (Conservative – Romford)
Douglas Ross (Conservative – Moray)
Lee Rowley (Conservative – North East Derbyshire)
Amber Rudd (Conservative – Hastings and Rye)
David Rutley (Conservative – Macclesfield)
Paul Scully (Conservative – Sutton and Cheam)
Bob Seely (Conservative – Isle of Wight)
Andrew Selous (Conservative – South West Bedfordshire)
Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party – Strangford)
Grant Shapps (Conservative – Welwyn Hatfield)
Alok Sharma (Conservative – Reading West)
Alec Shelbrooke (Conservative – Elmet and Rothwell)
David Simpson (Democratic Unionist Party – Upper Bann)
Keith Simpson (Conservative – Broadland)
Chris Skidmore (Conservative – Kingswood)
Chloe Smith (Conservative – Norwich North) (Proxy vote cast by Jo Churchill)
Henry Smith (Conservative – Crawley)
Julian Smith (Conservative – Skipton and Ripon)
Royston Smith (Conservative – Southampton, Itchen)
Mark Spencer (Conservative – Sherwood)
Andrew Stephenson (Conservative – Pendle)
John Stevenson (Conservative – Carlisle)
Bob Stewart (Conservative – Beckenham)
Gary Streeter (Conservative – South West Devon)
Mel Stride (Conservative – Central Devon)
Graham Stuart (Conservative – Beverley and Holderness)
Julian Sturdy (Conservative – York Outer)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative – Richmond (Yorks))
Desmond Swayne (Conservative – New Forest West)
Hugo Swire (Conservative – East Devon)
Robert Syms (Conservative – Poole)
Derek Thomas (Conservative – St Ives)
Ross Thomson (Conservative – Aberdeen South)
Maggie Throup (Conservative – Erewash)
Kelly Tolhurst (Conservative – Rochester and Strood)
Justin Tomlinson (Conservative – North Swindon)
Michael Tomlinson (Conservative – Mid Dorset and North Poole)
Craig Tracey (Conservative – North Warwickshire)
David Tredinnick (Conservative – Bosworth)
Anne-Marie Trevelyan (Conservative – Berwick-upon-Tweed)
Elizabeth Truss (Conservative – South West Norfolk)
Tom Tugendhat (Conservative – Tonbridge and Malling)
Shailesh Vara (Conservative – North West Cambridgeshire)
Martin Vickers (Conservative – Cleethorpes)
Theresa Villiers (Conservative – Chipping Barnet)
Charles Walker (Conservative – Broxbourne)
Robin Walker (Conservative – Worcester)
Ben Wallace (Conservative – Wyre and Preston North)
David Warburton (Conservative – Somerton and Frome)
Matt Warman (Conservative – Boston and Skegness)
Giles Watling (Conservative – Clacton)
Helen Whately (Conservative – Faversham and Mid Kent)
Heather Wheeler (Conservative – South Derbyshire)
Craig Whittaker (Conservative – Calder Valley)
John Whittingdale (Conservative – Maldon)
Bill Wiggin (Conservative – North Herefordshire)
Gavin Williamson (Conservative – South Staffordshire)
Sammy Wilson (Democratic Unionist Party – East Antrim)
Mike Wood (Conservative – Dudley South)
William Wragg (Conservative – Hazel Grove)
Jeremy Wright (Conservative – Kenilworth and Southam)
Nadhim Zahawi (Conservative – Stratford-on-Avon)

MPs who did not vote

Orfhlaith Begley (Sinn Fein – West Tyrone)
John Bercow (Speaker – Buckingham)
Mickey Brady (Sinn Fein – Newry and Armagh)
Ronnie Campbell (Labour – Blyth Valley)
Ann Clwyd (Labour – Cynon Valley)
Michelle Gildernew (Sinn Fein – Fermanagh and South Tyrone)
Chris Hazzard (Sinn Fein – South Down)
Stephen Hepburn (Labour – Jarrow)
Kelvin Hopkins (Independent – Luton North)
Lindsay Hoyle (Deputy Speaker – Chorley)
Eleanor Laing (Deputy Speaker – Epping Forest)
John Mann (Labour – Bassetlaw)
Paul Maskey (Sinn Fein – Belfast West)
Elisha McCallion (Sinn Fein – Foyle)
Francie Molloy (Sinn Fein – Mid Ulster)
Caroline Nokes (Independent – Romsey and Southampton North)
Jared O’Mara (Independent – Sheffield, Hallam)
Derek Twigg (Labour – Halton)
Chris Williamson (Independent – Derby North)
Rosie Winterton (Deputy Speaker – Doncaster Central)

How did my MP vote on calling an early election?

Result: Motion did not pass because two thirds of MPs did not vote. 298 voted yes, 56 voted no and the rest did not vote.

MPs who voted yes

Nigel Adams (Conservative – Selby and Ainsty)
Bim Afolami (Conservative – Hitchin and Harpenden)
Adam Afriyie (Conservative – Windsor)
Peter Aldous (Conservative – Waveney)
Lucy Allan (Conservative – Telford)
David Amess (Conservative – Southend West)
Edward Argar (Conservative – Charnwood)
Victoria Atkins (Conservative – Louth and Horncastle)
Richard Bacon (Conservative – South Norfolk)
Kemi Badenoch (Conservative – Saffron Walden)
Steve Baker (Conservative – Wycombe)
Harriett Baldwin (Conservative – West Worcestershire)
Stephen Barclay (Conservative – North East Cambridgeshire)
John Baron (Conservative – Basildon and Billericay)
Henry Bellingham (Conservative – North West Norfolk)
Paul Beresford (Conservative – Mole Valley)
Jake Berry (Conservative – Rossendale and Darwen)
Bob Blackman (Conservative – Harrow East)
Crispin Blunt (Conservative – Reigate)
Peter Bone (Conservative – Wellingborough)
Peter Bottomley (Conservative – Worthing West)
Andrew Bowie (Conservative – West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine)
Ben Bradley (Conservative – Mansfield)
Karen Bradley (Conservative – Staffordshire Moorlands)
Graham Brady (Conservative – Altrincham and Sale West)
Suella Braverman (Conservative – Fareham)
Jack Brereton (Conservative – Stoke-on-Trent South)
Andrew Bridgen (Conservative – North West Leicestershire)
James Brokenshire (Conservative – Old Bexley and Sidcup)
Fiona Bruce (Conservative – Congleton)
Robert Buckland (Conservative – South Swindon)
Alex Burghart (Conservative – Brentwood and Ongar)
Conor Burns (Conservative – Bournemouth West)
Alun Cairns (Conservative – Vale of Glamorgan)
Gregory Campbell (Democratic Unionist Party – East Londonderry)
Ronnie Campbell (Labour – Blyth Valley)
James Cartlidge (Conservative – South Suffolk)
William Cash (Conservative – Stone)
Maria Caulfield (Conservative – Lewes)
Alex Chalk (Conservative – Cheltenham)
Rehman Chishti (Conservative – Gillingham and Rainham)
Christopher Chope (Conservative – Christchurch)
Jo Churchill (Conservative – Bury St Edmunds)
Colin Clark (Conservative – Gordon)
Simon Clarke (Conservative – Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)
James Cleverly (Conservative – Braintree)
Geoffrey Clifton-Brown (Conservative – The Cotswolds)
Th?r?se Coffey (Conservative – Suffolk Coastal)
Damian Collins (Conservative – Folkestone and Hythe)
Alberto Costa (Conservative – South Leicestershire)
Robert Courts (Conservative – Witney)
Geoffrey Cox (Conservative – Torridge and West Devon)
Stephen Crabb (Conservative – Preseli Pembrokeshire)
Tracey Crouch (Conservative – Chatham and Aylesford)
David T. C. Davies (Conservative – Monmouth)
Glyn Davies (Conservative – Montgomeryshire)
Mims Davies (Conservative – Eastleigh)
Philip Davies (Conservative – Shipley)
David Davis (Conservative – Haltemprice and Howden)
Caroline Dinenage (Conservative – Gosport)
Jonathan Djanogly (Conservative – Huntingdon)
Leo Docherty (Conservative – Aldershot)
Nigel Dodds (Democratic Unionist Party – Belfast North)
Jeffrey M. Donaldson (Democratic Unionist Party – Lagan Valley)
Michelle Donelan (Conservative – Chippenham)
Nadine Dorries (Conservative – Mid Bedfordshire)
Steve Double (Conservative – St Austell and Newquay)
Oliver Dowden (Conservative – Hertsmere)
Jackie Doyle-Price (Conservative – Thurrock)
Richard Drax (Conservative – South Dorset)
James Duddridge (Conservative – Rochford and Southend East)
David Duguid (Conservative – Banff and Buchan)
Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative – Chingford and Woodford Green)
Alan Duncan (Conservative – Rutland and Melton)
Philip Dunne (Conservative – Ludlow)
Michael Ellis (Conservative – Northampton North)
Tobias Ellwood (Conservative – Bournemouth East)
Charlie Elphicke (Independent – Dover)
George Eustice (Conservative – Camborne and Redruth)
Nigel Evans (Conservative – Ribble Valley)
David Evennett (Conservative – Bexleyheath and Crayford)
Michael Fabricant (Conservative – Lichfield)
Michael Fallon (Conservative – Sevenoaks)
Mark Field (Conservative – Cities of London and Westminster)
Vicky Ford (Conservative – Chelmsford)
Kevin Foster (Conservative – Torbay)
Liam Fox (Conservative – North Somerset)
Mark Francois (Conservative – Rayleigh and Wickford)
Lucy Frazer (Conservative – South East Cambridgeshire)
George Freeman (Conservative – Mid Norfolk)
Mike Freer (Conservative – Finchley and Golders Green)
Marcus Fysh (Conservative – Yeovil)
Roger Gale (Conservative – North Thanet)
Mark Garnier (Conservative – Wyre Forest)
Nusrat Ghani (Conservative – Wealden)
Nick Gibb (Conservative – Bognor Regis and Littlehampton)
Cheryl Gillan (Conservative – Chesham and Amersham)
Paul Girvan (Democratic Unionist Party – South Antrim)
John Glen (Conservative – Salisbury)
Zac Goldsmith (Conservative – Richmond Park)
Robert Goodwill (Conservative – Scarborough and Whitby)
Michael Gove (Conservative – Surrey Heath)
Luke Graham (Conservative – Ochil and South Perthshire)
Richard Graham (Conservative – Gloucester)
Bill Grant (Conservative – Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock)
Helen Grant (Conservative – Maidstone and The Weald)
James Gray (Conservative – North Wiltshire)
Chris Grayling (Conservative – Epsom and Ewell)
Chris Green (Conservative – Bolton West)
Damian Green (Conservative – Ashford)
Andrew Griffiths (Conservative – Burton)
Kirstene Hair (Conservative – Angus)
Robert Halfon (Conservative – Harlow)
Luke Hall (Conservative – Thornbury and Yate)
Matt Hancock (Conservative – West Suffolk)
Greg Hands (Conservative – Chelsea and Fulham)
Mark Harper (Conservative – Forest of Dean)
Rebecca Harris (Conservative – Castle Point)
Trudy Harrison (Conservative – Copeland)
Simon Hart (Conservative – Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire)
John Hayes (Conservative – South Holland and The Deepings)
Oliver Heald (Conservative – North East Hertfordshire)
James Heappey (Conservative – Wells)
Chris Heaton-Harris (Conservative – Daventry)
Peter Heaton-Jones (Conservative – North Devon)
Gordon Henderson (Conservative – Sittingbourne and Sheppey)
Stephen Hepburn (Labour – Jarrow)
Nick Herbert (Conservative – Arundel and South Downs)
Damian Hinds (Conservative – East Hampshire)
Simon Hoare (Conservative – North Dorset)
Kate Hoey (Labour – Vauxhall)
George Hollingbery (Conservative – Meon Valley)
Kevin Hollinrake (Conservative – Thirsk and Malton)
Philip Hollobone (Conservative – Kettering)
Adam Holloway (Conservative – Gravesham)
John Howell (Conservative – Henley)
Nigel Huddleston (Conservative – Mid Worcestershire)
Eddie Hughes (Conservative – Walsall North)
Jeremy Hunt (Conservative – South West Surrey)
Nick Hurd (Conservative – Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner)
Alister Jack (Conservative – Dumfries and Galloway)
Sajid Javid (Conservative – Bromsgrove)
Ranil Jayawardena (Conservative – North East Hampshire)
Bernard Jenkin (Conservative – Harwich and North Essex)
Andrea Jenkyns (Conservative – Morley and Outwood)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative – Newark)
Boris Johnson (Conservative – Uxbridge and South Ruislip)
Caroline Johnson (Conservative – Sleaford and North Hykeham)
Gareth Johnson (Conservative – Dartford)
Joseph Johnson (Conservative – Orpington)
Andrew Jones (Conservative – Harrogate and Knaresborough)
David Jones (Conservative – Clwyd West)
Marcus Jones (Conservative – Nuneaton)
Daniel Kawczynski (Conservative – Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Gillian Keegan (Conservative – Chichester)
Seema Kennedy (Conservative – South Ribble)
Stephen Kerr (Conservative – Stirling)
Julian Knight (Conservative – Solihull)
Greg Knight (Conservative – East Yorkshire)
Kwasi Kwarteng (Conservative – Spelthorne)
John Lamont (Conservative – Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk)
Mark Lancaster (Conservative – Milton Keynes North)
Pauline Latham (Conservative – Mid Derbyshire)
Andrea Leadsom (Conservative – South Northamptonshire)
Jeremy Lefroy (Conservative – Stafford)
Edward Leigh (Conservative – Gainsborough)
Andrew Lewer (Conservative – Northampton South)
Brandon Lewis (Conservative – Great Yarmouth)
Julian Lewis (Conservative – New Forest East)
Ian Liddell-Grainger (Conservative – Bridgwater and West Somerset)
David Lidington (Conservative – Aylesbury)
Emma Little Pengelly (Democratic Unionist Party – Belfast South)
Julia Lopez (Conservative – Hornchurch and Upminster)
Jack Lopresti (Conservative – Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Jonathan Lord (Conservative – Woking)
Tim Loughton (Conservative – East Worthing and Shoreham)
Craig Mackinlay (Conservative – South Thanet)
Rachel Maclean (Conservative – Redditch)
Anne Main (Conservative – St Albans)
Alan Mak (Conservative – Havant)
Kit Malthouse (Conservative – North West Hampshire)
Scott Mann (Conservative – North Cornwall)
Paul Masterton (Conservative – East Renfrewshire)
Theresa May (Conservative – Maidenhead)
Paul Maynard (Conservative – Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Patrick McLoughlin (Conservative – Derbyshire Dales)
Stephen McPartland (Conservative – Stevenage)
Esther McVey (Conservative – Tatton)
Mark Menzies (Conservative – Fylde)
Johnny Mercer (Conservative – Plymouth, Moor View)
Huw Merriman (Conservative – Bexhill and Battle)
Stephen Metcalfe (Conservative – South Basildon and East Thurrock)
Maria Miller (Conservative – Basingstoke)
Amanda Milling (Conservative – Cannock Chase)
Nigel Mills (Conservative – Amber Valley)
Andrew Mitchell (Conservative – Sutton Coldfield)
Damien Moore (Conservative – Southport)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative – Portsmouth North)
Nicky Morgan (Conservative – Loughborough)
Anne Marie Morris (Conservative – Newton Abbot)
David Morris (Conservative – Morecambe and Lunesdale)
James Morris (Conservative – Halesowen and Rowley Regis)
Wendy Morton (Conservative – Aldridge-Brownhills)
David Mundell (Conservative – Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale)
Sheryll Murray (Conservative – South East Cornwall)
Andrew Murrison (Conservative – South West Wiltshire)
Robert Neill (Conservative – Bromley and Chislehurst)
Sarah Newton (Conservative – Truro and Falmouth)
Jesse Norman (Conservative – Hereford and South Herefordshire)
Neil O’Brien (Conservative – Harborough)
Matthew Offord (Conservative – Hendon)
Guy Opperman (Conservative – Hexham)
Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist Party – North Antrim)
Neil Parish (Conservative – Tiverton and Honiton)
Priti Patel (Conservative – Witham)
Owen Paterson (Conservative – North Shropshire)
Mark Pawsey (Conservative – Rugby)
Mike Penning (Conservative – Hemel Hempstead)
John Penrose (Conservative – Weston-super-Mare)
Andrew Percy (Conservative – Brigg and Goole)
Claire Perry (Conservative – Devizes)
Chris Philp (Conservative – Croydon South)
Christopher Pincher (Conservative – Tamworth)
Dan Poulter (Conservative – Central Suffolk and North Ipswich)
Rebecca Pow (Conservative – Taunton Deane)
Victoria Prentis (Conservative – Banbury)
Mark Prisk (Conservative – Hertford and Stortford)
Mark Pritchard (Conservative – The Wrekin)
Tom Pursglove (Conservative – Corby)
Jeremy Quin (Conservative – Horsham)
Will Quince (Conservative – Colchester)
Dominic Raab (Conservative – Esher and Walton)
John Redwood (Conservative – Wokingham)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative – North East Somerset)
Laurence Robertson (Conservative – Tewkesbury)
Gavin Robinson (Democratic Unionist Party – Belfast East)
Mary Robinson (Conservative – Cheadle)
Andrew Rosindell (Conservative – Romford)
Douglas Ross (Conservative – Moray)
Lee Rowley (Conservative – North East Derbyshire)
Amber Rudd (Conservative – Hastings and Rye)
David Rutley (Conservative – Macclesfield)
Paul Scully (Conservative – Sutton and Cheam)
Bob Seely (Conservative – Isle of Wight)
Andrew Selous (Conservative – South West Bedfordshire)
Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party – Strangford)
Grant Shapps (Conservative – Welwyn Hatfield)
Alok Sharma (Conservative – Reading West)
Alec Shelbrooke (Conservative – Elmet and Rothwell)
David Simpson (Democratic Unionist Party – Upper Bann)
Chris Skidmore (Conservative – Kingswood)
Chloe Smith (Conservative – Norwich North)
Henry Smith (Conservative – Crawley)
Julian Smith (Conservative – Skipton and Ripon)
Royston Smith (Conservative – Southampton, Itchen)
Mark Spencer (Conservative – Sherwood)
Andrew Stephenson (Conservative – Pendle)
John Stevenson (Conservative – Carlisle)
Bob Stewart (Conservative – Beckenham)
Gary Streeter (Conservative – South West Devon)
Mel Stride (Conservative – Central Devon)
Graham Stuart (Conservative – Beverley and Holderness)
Julian Sturdy (Conservative – York Outer)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative – Richmond (Yorks))
Desmond Swayne (Conservative – New Forest West)
Hugo Swire (Conservative – East Devon)
Robert Syms (Conservative – Poole)
Derek Thomas (Conservative – St Ives)
Ross Thomson (Conservative – Aberdeen South)
Maggie Throup (Conservative – Erewash)
Kelly Tolhurst (Conservative – Rochester and Strood)
Justin Tomlinson (Conservative – North Swindon)
Michael Tomlinson (Conservative – Mid Dorset and North Poole)
Craig Tracey (Conservative – North Warwickshire)
David Tredinnick (Conservative – Bosworth)
Anne-Marie Trevelyan (Conservative – Berwick-upon-Tweed)
Elizabeth Truss (Conservative – South West Norfolk)
Tom Tugendhat (Conservative – Tonbridge and Malling)
Shailesh Vara (Conservative – North West Cambridgeshire)
Martin Vickers (Conservative – Cleethorpes)
Theresa Villiers (Conservative – Chipping Barnet)
Charles Walker (Conservative – Broxbourne)
Robin Walker (Conservative – Worcester)
Ben Wallace (Conservative – Wyre and Preston North)
David Warburton (Conservative – Somerton and Frome)
Matt Warman (Conservative – Boston and Skegness)
Giles Watling (Conservative – Clacton)
Helen Whately (Conservative – Faversham and Mid Kent)
Heather Wheeler (Conservative – South Derbyshire)
Craig Whittaker (Conservative – Calder Valley)
John Whittingdale (Conservative – Maldon)
Bill Wiggin (Conservative – North Herefordshire)
Gavin Williamson (Conservative – South Staffordshire)
Sammy Wilson (Democratic Unionist Party – East Antrim)
Mike Wood (Conservative – Dudley South)
William Wragg (Conservative – Hazel Grove)
Jeremy Wright (Conservative – Kenilworth and Southam)
Nadhim Zahawi (Conservative – Stratford-on-Avon)

MPs who voted no

Heidi Allen (Independent – South Cambridgeshire)
Margaret Beckett (Labour – Derby South)
Luciana Berger (Independent – Liverpool, Wavertree)
Chris Bryant (Labour – Rhondda)
Karen Buck (Labour – Westminster North)
Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat – Twickenham)
Alistair Carmichael (Liberal Democrat – Orkney and Shetland)
Kenneth Clarke (Independent – Rushcliffe)
Ann Coffey (The Independent Group for Change – Stockport)
Neil Coyle (Labour – Bermondsey and Old Southwark)
Stella Creasy (Labour – Walthamstow)
Jim Cunningham (Labour – Coventry South)
Edward Davey (Liberal Democrat – Kingston and Surbiton)
Jane Dodds (Liberal Democrat – Brecon and Radnorshire)
Paul Farrelly (Labour – Newcastle-under-Lyme)
Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat – Westmorland and Lonsdale)
Mike Gapes (The Independent Group for Change – Ilford South)
Helen Hayes (Labour – Dulwich and West Norwood)
Lady Hermon (Independent – North Down)
Wera Hobhouse (Liberal Democrat – Bath)
Christine Jardine (Liberal Democrat – Edinburgh West)
Graham P Jones (Labour – Hyndburn)
Helen Jones (Labour – Warrington North)
Peter Kyle (Labour – Hove)
Ben Lake (Plaid Cymru – Ceredigion)
Norman Lamb (Liberal Democrat – North Norfolk)
Phillip Lee (Liberal Democrat – Bracknell)
Chris Leslie (The Independent Group for Change – Nottingham East)
Stephen Lloyd (Independent – Eastbourne)
Holly Lynch (Labour – Halifax)
Sandy Martin (Labour – Ipswich)
Kerry McCarthy (Labour – Bristol East)
Siobhain McDonagh (Labour – Mitcham and Morden)
Liz McInnes (Labour – Heywood and Middleton)
Catherine McKinnell (Labour – Newcastle upon Tyne North)
Madeleine Moon (Labour – Bridgend)
Layla Moran (Liberal Democrat – Oxford West and Abingdon)
Ian Murray (Labour – Edinburgh South)
Albert Owen (Labour – Ynys M?n)
Jess Phillips (Labour – Birmingham, Yardley)
Matt Rodda (Labour – Reading East)
Joan Ryan (The Independent Group for Change – Enfield North)
Antoinette Sandbach (Independent – Eddisbury)
Liz Saville Roberts (Plaid Cymru – Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Barry Sheerman (Labour – Huddersfield)
Angela Smith (Independent – Penistone and Stocksbridge)
Owen Smith (Labour – Pontypridd)
Anna Soubry (The Independent Group for Change – Broxtowe)
Jo Stevens (Labour – Cardiff Central)
Jamie Stone (Liberal Democrat – Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross)
Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat – East Dunbartonshire)
Chuka Umunna (Liberal Democrat – Streatham)
Martin Whitfield (Labour – East Lothian)
Hywel Williams (Plaid Cymru – Arfon)
Phil Wilson (Labour – Sedgefield)
Daniel Zeichner (Labour – Cambridge)

MPs who did not vote

Diane Abbott (Labour – Hackney North and Stoke Newington)
Debbie Abrahams (Labour – Oldham East and Saddleworth)
Rushanara Ali (Labour – Bethnal Green and Bow)
Rosena Allin-Khan (Labour – Tooting)
Mike Amesbury (Labour – Weaver Vale)
Tonia Antoniazzi (Labour – Gower)
Jonathan Ashworth (Labour – Leicester South)
Ian Austin (Independent – Dudley North)
Adrian Bailey (Labour – West Bromwich West)
Hannah Bardell (Scottish National Party – Livingston)
Kevin Barron (Labour – Rother Valley)
Guto Bebb (Independent – Aberconwy)
?rfhlaith Begley (Sinn F?in – West Tyrone)
Hilary Benn (Labour – Leeds Central)
Richard Benyon (Independent – Newbury)
John Bercow (Speaker – Buckingham)
Clive Betts (Labour – Sheffield South East)
Mhairi Black (Scottish National Party – Paisley and Renfrewshire South)
Ian Blackford (Scottish National Party – Ross, Skye and Lochaber)
Kirsty Blackman (Scottish National Party – Aberdeen North)
Roberta Blackman-Woods (Labour – City of Durham)
Paul Blomfield (Labour – Sheffield Central)
Nick Boles (Independent – Grantham and Stamford)
Tracy Brabin (Labour – Batley and Spen)
Ben Bradshaw (Labour – Exeter)
Mickey Brady (Sinn F?in – Newry and Armagh)
Kevin Brennan (Labour – Cardiff West)
Steve Brine (Independent – Winchester)
Deidre Brock (Scottish National Party – Edinburgh North and Leith)
Alan Brown (Scottish National Party – Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Lyn Brown (Labour – West Ham)
Nicholas Brown (Labour – Newcastle upon Tyne East)
Richard Burden (Labour – Birmingham, Northfield)
Richard Burgon (Labour – Leeds East)
Alistair Burt (Independent – North East Bedfordshire)
Dawn Butler (Labour – Brent Central)
Liam Byrne (Labour – Birmingham, Hodge Hill)
Ruth Cadbury (Labour – Brentford and Isleworth)
Lisa Cameron (Scottish National Party – East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow)
Alan Campbell (Labour – Tynemouth)
Dan Carden (Labour – Liverpool, Walton)
Sarah Champion (Labour – Rotherham)
Douglas Chapman (Scottish National Party – Dunfermline and West Fife)
Jenny Chapman (Labour – Darlington)
Bambos Charalambous (Labour – Enfield, Southgate)
Joanna Cherry (Scottish National Party – Edinburgh South West)
Greg Clark (Independent – Tunbridge Wells)
Ann Clwyd (Labour – Cynon Valley)
Vernon Coaker (Labour – Gedling)
Julie Cooper (Labour – Burnley)
Rosie Cooper (Labour – West Lancashire)
Yvette Cooper (Labour – Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford)
Jeremy Corbyn (Labour – Islington North)
Ronnie Cowan (Scottish National Party – Inverclyde)
David Crausby (Labour – Bolton North East)
Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party – Lanark and Hamilton East)
Mary Creagh (Labour – Wakefield)
Jon Cruddas (Labour – Dagenham and Rainham)
John Cryer (Labour – Leyton and Wanstead)
Judith Cummins (Labour – Bradford South)
Alex Cunningham (Labour – Stockton North)
Janet Daby (Labour – Lewisham East)
Nic Dakin (Labour – Scunthorpe)
Wayne David (Labour – Caerphilly)
Geraint Davies (Labour – Swansea West)
Martyn Day (Scottish National Party – Linlithgow and East Falkirk)
Marsha De Cordova (Labour – Battersea)
Gloria De Piero (Labour – Ashfield)
Thangam Debbonaire (Labour – Bristol West)
Emma Dent Coad (Labour – Kensington)
Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (Labour – Slough)
Martin Docherty-Hughes (Scottish National Party – West Dunbartonshire)
Anneliese Dodds (Labour – Oxford East)
Stephen Doughty (Labour – Cardiff South and Penarth)
Peter Dowd (Labour – Bootle)
David Drew (Labour – Stroud)
Jack Dromey (Labour – Birmingham, Erdington)
Rosie Duffield (Labour – Canterbury)
Maria Eagle (Labour – Garston and Halewood)
Angela Eagle (Labour – Wallasey)
Clive Efford (Labour – Eltham)
Julie Elliott (Labour – Sunderland Central)
Louise Ellman (Labour – Liverpool, Riverside)
Chris Elmore (Labour – Ogmore)
Bill Esterson (Labour – Sefton Central)
Chris Evans (Labour – Islwyn)
Marion Fellows (Scottish National Party – Motherwell and Wishaw)
Frank Field (Independent – Birkenhead)
Jim Fitzpatrick (Labour – Poplar and Limehouse)
Colleen Fletcher (Labour – Coventry North East)
Caroline Flint (Labour – Don Valley)
Lisa Forbes (Labour – Peterborough)
Yvonne Fovargue (Labour – Makerfield)
Vicky Foxcroft (Labour – Lewisham, Deptford)
James Frith (Labour – Bury North)
Gill Furniss (Labour – Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough)
Hugh Gaffney (Labour – Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill)
Barry Gardiner (Labour – Brent North)
David Gauke (Independent – South West Hertfordshire)
Ruth George (Labour – High Peak)
Stephen Gethins (Scottish National Party – North East Fife)
Patricia Gibson (Scottish National Party – North Ayrshire and Arran)
Michelle Gildernew (Sinn F?in – Fermanagh and South Tyrone)
Preet Kaur Gill (Labour – Birmingham, Edgbaston)
Mary Glindon (Labour – North Tyneside)
Roger Godsiff (Labour – Birmingham, Hall Green)
Helen Goodman (Labour – Bishop Auckland)
Patrick Grady (Scottish National Party – Glasgow North)
Peter Grant (Scottish National Party – Glenrothes)
Neil Gray (Scottish National Party – Airdrie and Shotts)
Kate Green (Labour – Stretford and Urmston)
Justine Greening (Independent – Putney)
Lilian Greenwood (Labour – Nottingham South)
Margaret Greenwood (Labour – Wirral West)
Dominic Grieve (Independent – Beaconsfield)
Nia Griffith (Labour – Llanelli)
John Grogan (Labour – Keighley)
Andrew Gwynne (Labour – Denton and Reddish)
Sam Gyimah (Independent – East Surrey)
Louise Haigh (Labour – Sheffield, Heeley)
Fabian Hamilton (Labour – Leeds North East)
Philip Hammond (Independent – Runnymede and Weybridge)
Stephen Hammond (Independent – Wimbledon)
David Hanson (Labour – Delyn)
Emma Hardy (Labour – Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Harriet Harman (Labour – Camberwell and Peckham)
Richard Harrington (Independent – Watford)
Carolyn Harris (Labour – Swansea East)
Sue Hayman (Labour – Workington)
Chris Hazzard (Sinn F?in – South Down)
John Healey (Labour – Wentworth and Dearne)
Mark Hendrick (Labour – Preston)
Drew Hendry (Scottish National Party – Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey)
Mike Hill (Labour – Hartlepool)
Meg Hillier (Labour – Hackney South and Shoreditch)
Margaret Hodge (Labour – Barking)
Sharon Hodgson (Labour – Washington and Sunderland West)
Kate Hollern (Labour – Blackburn)
Kelvin Hopkins (Independent – Luton North)
Stewart Hosie (Scottish National Party – Dundee East)
George Howarth (Labour – Knowsley)
Lindsay Hoyle (Deputy Speaker – Chorley)
Rupa Huq (Labour – Ealing Central and Acton)
Imran Hussain (Labour – Bradford East)
Margot James (Independent – Stourbridge)
Dan Jarvis (Labour – Barnsley Central)
Diana Johnson (Labour – Kingston upon Hull North)
Darren Jones (Labour – Bristol North West)
Gerald Jones (Labour – Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney)
Kevan Jones (Labour – North Durham)
Ruth Jones (Labour – Newport West)
Sarah Jones (Labour – Croydon Central)
Susan Elan Jones (Labour – Clwyd South)
Mike Kane (Labour – Wythenshawe and Sale East)
Barbara Keeley (Labour – Worsley and Eccles South)
Liz Kendall (Labour – Leicester West)
Afzal Khan (Labour – Manchester, Gorton)
Ged Killen (Labour – Rutherglen and Hamilton West)
Stephen Kinnock (Labour – Aberavon)
Eleanor Laing (Deputy Speaker – Epping Forest)
Lesley Laird (Labour – Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath)
David Lammy (Labour – Tottenham)
Ian Lavery (Labour – Wansbeck)
Chris Law (Scottish National Party – Dundee West)
Karen Lee (Labour – Lincoln)
Oliver Letwin (Independent – West Dorset)
Emma Lewell-Buck (Labour – South Shields)
Clive Lewis (Labour – Norwich South)
Ivan Lewis (Independent – Bury South)
David Linden (Scottish National Party – Glasgow East)
Tony Lloyd (Labour – Rochdale)
Rebecca Long Bailey (Labour – Salford and Eccles)
Caroline Lucas (Green Party – Brighton, Pavilion)
Ian C. Lucas (Labour – Wrexham)
Angus Brendan MacNeil (Scottish National Party – Na h-Eileanan an Iar)
Justin Madders (Labour – Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Khalid Mahmood (Labour – Birmingham, Perry Barr)
Shabana Mahmood (Labour – Birmingham, Ladywood)
Seema Malhotra (Labour – Feltham and Heston)
John Mann (Labour – Bassetlaw)
Gordon Marsden (Labour – Blackpool South)
Rachael Maskell (Labour – York Central)
Paul Maskey (Sinn F?in – Belfast West)
Christian Matheson (Labour – City of Chester)
Steve McCabe (Labour – Birmingham, Selly Oak)
Elisha McCallion (Sinn F?in – Foyle)
Andy McDonald (Labour – Middlesbrough)
Stewart Malcolm McDonald (Scottish National Party – Glasgow South)
Stuart C. McDonald (Scottish National Party – Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
John McDonnell (Labour – Hayes and Harlington)
Pat McFadden (Labour – Wolverhampton South East)
Conor McGinn (Labour – St Helens North)
Alison McGovern (Labour – Wirral South)
Jim McMahon (Labour – Oldham West and Royton)
Anna McMorrin (Labour – Cardiff North)
John McNally (Scottish National Party – Falkirk)
Ian Mearns (Labour – Gateshead)
Edward Miliband (Labour – Doncaster North)
Anne Milton (Independent – Guildford)
Francie Molloy (Sinn F?in – Mid Ulster)
Carol Monaghan (Scottish National Party – Glasgow North West)
Jessica Morden (Labour – Newport East)
Stephen Morgan (Labour – Portsmouth South)
Grahame Morris (Labour – Easington)
Lisa Nandy (Labour – Wigan)
Gavin Newlands (Scottish National Party – Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
Caroline Nokes (Independent – Romsey and Southampton North)
Alex Norris (Labour – Nottingham North)
Brendan O’Hara (Scottish National Party – Argyll and Bute)
Jared O’Mara (Independent – Sheffield, Hallam)
Melanie Onn (Labour – Great Grimsby)
Chi Onwurah (Labour – Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Kate Osamor (Labour – Edmonton)
Stephanie Peacock (Labour – Barnsley East)
Teresa Pearce (Labour – Erith and Thamesmead)
Matthew Pennycook (Labour – Greenwich and Woolwich)
Toby Perkins (Labour – Chesterfield)
Bridget Phillipson (Labour – Houghton and Sunderland South)
Laura Pidcock (Labour – North West Durham)
Jo Platt (Labour – Leigh)
Luke Pollard (Labour – Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport)
Stephen Pound (Labour – Ealing North)
Lucy Powell (Labour – Manchester Central)
Yasmin Qureshi (Labour – Bolton South East)
Faisal Rashid (Labour – Warrington South)
Angela Rayner (Labour – Ashton-under-Lyne)
Steve Reed (Labour – Croydon North)
Christina Rees (Labour – Neath)
Ellie Reeves (Labour – Lewisham West and Penge)
Rachel Reeves (Labour – Leeds West)
Emma Reynolds (Labour – Wolverhampton North East)
Jonathan Reynolds (Labour – Stalybridge and Hyde)
Marie Rimmer (Labour – St Helens South and Whiston)
Geoffrey Robinson (Labour – Coventry North West)
Danielle Rowley (Labour – Midlothian)
Chris Ruane (Labour – Vale of Clwyd)
Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Labour – Brighton, Kemptown)
Naz Shah (Labour – Bradford West)
Virendra Sharma (Labour – Ealing, Southall)
Tommy Sheppard (Scottish National Party – Edinburgh East)
Paula Sherriff (Labour – Dewsbury)
Gavin Shuker (Independent – Luton South)
Tulip Siddiq (Labour – Hampstead and Kilburn)
Keith Simpson (Conservative – Broadland)
Dennis Skinner (Labour – Bolsover)
Andy Slaughter (Labour – Hammersmith)
Ruth Smeeth (Labour – Stoke-on-Trent North)
Cat Smith (Labour – Lancaster and Fleetwood)
Eleanor Smith (Labour – Wolverhampton South West)
Jeff Smith (Labour – Manchester, Withington)
Laura Smith (Labour – Crewe and Nantwich)
Nick Smith (Labour – Blaenau Gwent)
Karin Smyth (Labour – Bristol South)
Gareth Snell (Labour – Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Nicholas Soames (Independent – Mid Sussex)
Alex Sobel (Labour – Leeds North West)
John Spellar (Labour – Warley)
Caroline Spelman (Conservative – Meriden)
Keir Starmer (Labour – Holborn and St Pancras)
Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party – Glasgow South West)
Rory Stewart (Independent – Penrith and The Border)
Wes Streeting (Labour – Ilford North)
Graham Stringer (Labour – Blackley and Broughton)
Paul Sweeney (Labour – Glasgow North East)
Mark Tami (Labour – Alyn and Deeside)
Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party – Glasgow Central)
Gareth Thomas (Labour – Harrow West)
Nick Thomas-Symonds (Labour – Torfaen)
Emily Thornberry (Labour – Islington South and Finsbury)
Stephen Timms (Labour – East Ham)
Jon Trickett (Labour – Hemsworth)
Anna Turley (Labour – Redcar)
Karl Turner (Labour – Kingston upon Hull East)
Derek Twigg (Labour – Halton)
Stephen Twigg (Labour – Liverpool, West Derby)
Liz Twist (Labour – Blaydon)
Edward Vaizey (Independent – Wantage)
Keith Vaz (Labour – Leicester East)
Valerie Vaz (Labour – Walsall South)
Thelma Walker (Labour – Colne Valley)
Tom Watson (Labour – West Bromwich East)
Catherine West (Labour – Hornsey and Wood Green)
Matt Western (Labour – Warwick and Leamington)
Alan Whitehead (Labour – Southampton, Test)
Philippa Whitford (Scottish National Party – Central Ayrshire)
Paul Williams (Labour – Stockton South)
Chris Williamson (Independent – Derby North)
Rosie Winterton (Deputy Speaker – Doncaster Central)
Pete Wishart (Scottish National Party – Perth and North Perthshire)
Sarah Wollaston (Liberal Democrat – Totnes)
John Woodcock (Independent – Barrow and Furness)
Mohammad Yasin (Labour – Bedford)

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General election vote result: MPs refuse to back Boris Johnson’s snap election until no-deal Brexit is blocked by law

MPs have refused to support holding a snap general election before a no-deal Brexit is ruled out by law.

In an evening of Commons drama, MPs voted to pass proposed legislation which would legally block the Prime Minister from pursuing a no-deal Brexit without their consent.

Boris Johnson received 298 votes for the election, with 56 against – nowhere near the two-thirds – 434 votes – required.

Former Conservative MPs who lost the whip after voting against no-deal Brexit last night did not vote with the Prime Minister, leaving him further from an election that he would have otherwise been.

Mr Johnson responded to the passing of the bill by calling for an election to take place before the 31 October Brexit deadline.

But opposition MPs stood firm in their view that no election should be called until the anti-no deal legislation is converted into law to stop any future Government leaving the EU without a deal.

MPs back anti-no deal bill

MPs approved a backbench Bill which would delay Brexit in order to prevent a no-deal withdrawal from the European Union.

The bill cleared the Commons when it passed its third reading by 327 votes to 299, majority 28, and should now progress to the Lords.

After the bill cleared its third reading, Mr Johnson said he wanted to hold an election on 15 October to decide who to send to Brussels to “sort this out”.

Mr Johnson, opening a debate on triggering an early general election, said: “I think it’s very sad that MPs have voted like this, I do, I think it’s a great dereliction of their democratic duty.

PM responds by calling election

Boris Johnson has lost a number of votes in the early days of his premiership (Photo: Reuters)

“But if I’m still Prime Minister after Tuesday October 15, then we will leave on October 31 with, I hope, a much better deal.”

But the motion required the support of at least two thirds of MPs in the house to pass.

Labour, supported by other opposition parties, said that it wanted an election but would only support a public poll once the new Bill had been passed into law.

Party leader Jeremy Corbyn accused the government of calling an election in order to suspend Parliament and therefore shut down debate.

PM is ‘avoiding scrutiny’

He said Mr Johnson’s Government was “an undemocratic cabal in Downing Street aligned with an undemocratic and unelected House to override the democratic will of this House expressed in the Bill that we have just given a third reading to”.

He added: “If they can’t win the argument they try to shut down debate.

“We had the Prime Minister deciding to prorogue Parliament in August and today he wants to dissolve Parliament to shut down scrutiny.”

He added: “A general election isn’t a play thing for a prime minister to avoid his obligations, to dodge scrutiny or renege on commitments. He has committed to renegotiate Brexit, but where is it? Where is the plan, where are the proposals?”

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Brexit vote: MPs vote to bring back Theresa May’s Brexit deal as they vote to block no-deal 327-299

Opposition MPs appear to have accidentally brought Theresa May’s deal back to the Commons for another vote as they passed a new law to block a no deal by 327 votes to 299.

Legislation proposed by the so-called “Rebel Alliance” group of MPs, which would prevent Boris Johnson pursuing a no-deal Brexit, passed its third reading on Wednesday.

But, in the process, an amendment to the bill – which called for Mrs May’s old deal to be voted on as part of the legislation – passed despite not having enough support.

The amendment, drawn up by Stephen Kinnock, was automatically passed because there were no tellers to read the result.

There were suggestions that it could have been a deliberate attempt to undermine the bill.

MPs voted to block Boris Johnson from forcing through a no-deal Brexit (Photo: Getty)

The bizarre turn in events came as Mr Johnson suffered his third defeat in two days of Commons votes.

The cross-party bill, proposed by Labour’s Hilary Benn, seeks to require the Prime Minister to reach a deal with the EU by mid-October, or formally request another extension until the end of January.

Amendment 19 of the bill was tabled Richard Graham, Tom Tugendhat, Jeremy Lefroy, Paul Masterton and Sarah Newton of the Conservative party.

It mandated a debate after the European Council meeting on the 17 and 18 October on either a new deal brought back by Boris Johnson, or on the original deal agreed by Mrs May.

It fell 65-495 but due to there being no tellers it automatically passed, meaning it is now included in the bill.

This story is being updated.

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Brexit vote: ‘Rebel Alliance’ bill to block no-deal passes first Commons vote by 329-300

The “Rebel Alliance” plan to legally block Boris Johnson from pursuing a no-deal Brexit without consent of Parliament passed its first Commons hurdle, supported by the majority of MPs.

The cross-party bill, proposed by Labour’s Hilary Benn, seeks to require the Prime Minister to reach a deal with the EU by mid-October, or formally request another extension until the end of January.

Mr Johnson said that he would never ask for another extension and set out to suspend Parliament, threaten MPs with deselection and then call for a general election all in an attempt to stop the plan.

But MPs defied his threats and voted in favour of the legislation, 329-300.

The result was the second significant defeat for the Prime Minister in as many days after he lost a bid to prevent backbench MPs from taking control of the Order Paper to make way for their proposed legislation.

The bill, titled European Union (Withdrawal) (no 6) Bill, would would require the Government to either:

Reach a deal with the EU by 19 October; or

Gain Parliament’s approval for a no-deal Brexit by 19 October

If the Government does not do either of these by 19 October, the legislation would then require the Prime Minister to then write to the EU to request another extension.

The date for this extension, as suggested in the proposed legislation, would be 31 January 2020.

This story is being updated.

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Spending review: Chancellor Sajid Javid unveils plan he says will ‘end austerity’ – as critics accuse him of electioneering

Sajid Javid declared that he is ending almost a decade of austerity as he unveiled the Government’s new spending plans, which include cash boosts for health, schools and the police.

The Chancellor set out plans to increase current and capital spending by £13.4bn in 2020-2021 – and said he would be focused on the “people’s priorities”.

But Mr Javid, who spent much of the opening part of the statement repeating Government lines on Brexit, had to be told off twice by House Speaker, John Bercow, who insisted he return to the substance of the spending review.

And shadow chancellor John McDonnell said the announcement as nothing more than a piece of “grubby electioneering”, accusing the Government of “pretending to end austerity when they do nothing of the sort”.

Electioneering

Mr McDonnell said that the Government was trying to “fool” the public by pretending to care about people’s issues and warned him to not “insult the intelligence of the British people”.

He said that the Government would be ending austerity with the new spending pledges (Photo: REUTERS)

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is putting forward a motion for a snap election later on Wednesday and, after spending the summer recess making repeated spending and policy pledges, many believe that an early election has been his strategy for some time.

This was reflected in the Chancellor’s statement which was full of promises to spend more money across a variety of Government departments.

He was repeatedly criticised by Mr Bercow who warned him that he was deviating from the topic of the spending round and, instead, straying into comments on Brexit and attacks on Labour.

Slapped down by Speaker

Mr Javid had described Labour as being “biggest threat to the UK economy” in a diatribe against the opposition before he was interrupted by Mr Bercow who said what he was doing was “really very unseemly”.

Mr Bercow said: “I say what I say with a heavy heart and not without reflection. There is a procedure to statements of this kind, a very long established procedure, and it bothers me greatly that the right honourable gentleman in the course of a statement seems to be veering into matters outwith, not even tangential, but unrelated to the spending round upon which he is focused.”

Read more:

What is going on in Parliament today and how are MPs trying to stop a no deal?

Mr Javid had described Labour as being “biggest threat to the UK economy” in a diatribe against the opposition before he was interrupted.

The spending plans were fast-tracked to clear the way for leaving the EU on 31 October and cover one year of spending.

Spending pledges

In the statement, Mr Javid told MPs: “We are turning the page on austerity and beginning a new decade of renewal. A new economic era needs a new economic plan and today we lay the foundations with the fastest increase in day-to-day spending in 15 years.”

He added: “No department will be cut next year. Every single department has had its budget for day to day spending increased at least in line with inflation. That’s what I mean by the end of austerity.”

Measures announced by the Chancellor included:

– A promise that no Whitehall department will be cut next year, with all ministries having their budget for day-to-day spending increased at least in line with inflation

– Councils will have access to an additional £1.5 billion to fund social care next year

– A 6.3% real terms increase in Home Office spending, including £750 million for the already announced plan to recruit 20,000 police officers

– A 5% real-terms increase for the Ministry of Justice resource budget

– Funding to tackle homelessness will rise by 13%, an extra £54 million

– A £6.2 billion increase in NHS funding

– £2.2 billion for the Ministry of Defence

– £700 million to support children and young people with special educational needs

– £200 million to “transform bus services”

– £160 million for Scottish farmers who lost out under the allocation of Common Agricultural Policy funding

– £90 million for 1,000 diplomats and overseas staff and upgraded missions to help “seize the opportunities of Brexit” around the world.

In his response, Mr McDonnell condemned the “pathetic sums” offered to Whitehall departments that were “on their knees” after almost a decade of austerity.

He made a dig against Dominic Cummings, Mr Johnson’s chief of staff, who he suggested had written the statement and said: “Could he tell Mr Cummings: Do not insult the intelligence of the British people.

Trying to ‘fool’ the public

“The people will see today’s statement as the grubby electioneering stunt that it is. This is not a Spending Review as we know it. It is straight out of the Lynton Crosby handbook: opinion poll politics.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell said that the statement was nothing but ‘grubby electioneering’ (Photo: PA Wire)

“The Tories have checked what are the top three or four issues in the polls and cynically judged just how little money they have to throw around to try and neutralise the concerns people have about those issues.

“To come here and then try to fool us with references to people’s priorities is beyond irony. When did these extremist right-wing Tories ever put the people first.”

He later added: “Pretending to end austerity when they do nothing of the sort. Pretending to plan ahead while they plot a no-deal Brexit that would devastate parts of our economy. A Chancellor and a Prime Minister with – as my Right Honourable Friend said yesterday – no mandate, no morals and no majority.”

Liberal Democrat Shadow Chancellor, Ed Davey, said the review contained “fantasy figures” because of the ​economic threat to the UK posed by Brexit.

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Jeremy Corbyn says ‘people have a great deal to fear’ if Boris Johnson treats the country the way he treats his own MPs

Jeremy Corbyn said the UK should “fear” Boris Johnson’s Government if he treats the country in the same way he treated members from his own party in a heated first session of PMQs for the Prime Minister.

The Labour leader grilled his counterpart at the Commons dispatch box a day after the Prime Minister lost a crucial Brexit vote that led to him sacking almost two dozen senior Tory MPs who rebelled against him.

In the clash Mr Corbyn accused the Prime Minister’s Brexit strategy of being nothing more than a “sham” and rebuked him for not publishing the full documents outlining the possible impact of a no-deal Brexit.

And he said the decision to withdraw the whip from long-standing Tory MPs because they voted to block a no deal scenario should be a matter of concern for members of the public.

PM ‘avoiding scrutiny’

Jeremy Corbyn said the UK should ‘fear’ Mr Johnson (Photo: Reuters)

Mr Corbyn asked the Prime Minister for an update on the progress of Brexit negotiations with the EU and the planning for a no deal, before saying to the Commons: “He wont give us any of the information of the assessments of increased poverty that could come from his [Brexit] policy.”

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Boris Johnson gears up for another Commons battle as MPs attempt to block no-deal

He said: “The Prime Minister had two days in office before the summer recess and then planned to prorogue Parliament. Yesterday he lost one vote, his first vote in Parliament, and now wants to dissolve Parliament.”

Mr Corbyn went on: “He is desperate, absolutely desperate, to avoid scrutiny. And in his third day in office, after five questions from me, we haven’t had an answer to any of them.

“I can see why he is desperate to avoid scrutiny. He has no plan to get a new deal, no plan, no authority and no majority.

‘People have a great deal to fear’

Father of the House, Ken Clarke, and former Prine Minister Theresa May listened as Mr Johnson was criticised for sacking Tory MPs (Photo: BBC)

“If the Prime Minister does to the country what he has done to his party in the past 24 hours, I think a lot of people have a great deal to fear from his incompetence, his vacillation and his refusal to publish known facts that are known to him about the effects of a no-deal Brexit.”

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Full list of 21 MPs losing the whip over Brexit vote, from Ken Clarke to Nicholas Soames

SNP’s Westminster leader, Ian Blackford, said that “new boy” Mr Johnson was behaving like “a dictator, not a democrat” with his strategy as Prime Minister.

Labour MP Vernon Coaker said Mr Johnson’s decision to sack the MPs – who included father of the house Ken Clarke – was hypocritical given that he had voted repatedly against Theresa May’s Brexit deal.

“The Prime Minister yesterday booted out 21 MPs from his own party for voting against a reckless Brexit,” he said.

Boris Johnson was grilled in his first PMQs (Photo: PA Wire)

‘One rule for him’

“These included very well-respected members of the house […] given that the Prime Minister himself voted against the former Prime Minister’s deal without losing the whip does this not show and demonstrate to the British public his view of life – namely one rule of him and one rule for everyone else.”

The Labour benches cheered his comments, drowning out the Prime Minister as he tried to say he would not take lessons from Labour on how to run a party.

Those sacked from the Conservative party also included former chancellor Philip Hammond, David Gauke, and Rory Stewart, as well as Sir Nicholas Soames, who is the grandson of former prime minister Winston Churchill.

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Boris Johnson’s plan to prorogue Parliament is legal, judge rules

A judge has ruled that Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament early is not illegal, providing a victory for the Government as MPs try and block the Prime Minister’s Brexit plans. 

A group of cross-party MPs and Peers had launched legal action action against the Government that aimed to prevent the prorogation Parliament ahead of the Brexit deadline of 31 October.

MPs had argued Mr Johnson was using the device to shut down a debate on Brexit and limit further scrutiny or attempts to stop a no-deal Brexit.

But the judge at the highest civil court in Scotland deemed the move lawful, and said that it was not a matter for the courts but a political one.

Political judgement, not legal

The case, which had been fast-tracked given the political timetable, was considered at the Court of Session in Edinburgh on Tuesday.

Activists hold EU flags as they demonstrate outside of the Court of Session in Edinburgh (Photo: Getty Images)

Announcing his decision on Wednesday, Lord Doherty said choosing when to prorogue Parliament was for politicians and not the courts, but this ruling will now be appealed.

He said: “In my view the advice given in relation to the prorogation decision is a matter involving high policy and political judgement.

“This is political territory and decision-making, which cannot be measured by legal standards but only by political judgments. Accountability for the advice is to Parliament and ultimately the electorate and not to the courts.”

Lord Doherty added: “I do not accept the submission that the prorogation contravenes the rule of law and the claim is justiciable because of that.

“In my opinion there has been no contravention of the rule of law. The power to prorogue is a prerogative power and the Prime Minister had the vires (powers) to advise the sovereign as to its exercise.”

Appeal

The challenge from a cross-party group of 75 MPs and peers – led by SNP MP Joanna Cherry QC – argued the decision to prorogue Westminster to reduce time parliamentarians have is unlawful.

Jo Maugham QC, who was among those supporting the case, said after the ruling that the court’s decision suggests that the Prime Minister’s political power has no end.

Demonstrators hold up placards at a protest against the move to suspend parliament in the final weeks before Brexit outside Downing Street in London on August 31, 2019. (Photo: Getty)

“If he can do that for 34 days, why not 34 weeks or 34 months? Where does this political power end? It’s not the law as I understand it,” he said.

“Yesterday’s hearing was always going to be a bit of a pre-season friendly. We’re now focused on the Inner House, hopefully later this week, and then the Supreme Court on 17 September.”

Labour Edinburgh South MP Ian Murray, who was one of the petitioners in the case, insisted afterwards: “The fight against Boris Johnson’s assault on democracy and his plan to crash the UK out of the EU goes on.”

Mr Murray said: “There will be an appeal on this ruling and there is another court case taking place in England.

“But the main battle is currently in Parliament, where the Prime Minister has lost his majority and does not have the support of the House for his dangerous plan to impose a no-deal Brexit on the country.

“We have wrested control of parliamentary business and will attempt to pass a law that makes a no-deal Brexit illegal. We will also fight to secure a final say for the people of the UK on Brexit and we must campaign to remain in the EU.”

Brexit vote

A UK Government spokesman said: “As we have set out, the Government needs to bring forward a strong domestic legislative agenda – proroguing Parliament is the legal and necessary way of delivering this.

“We welcome the court’s decision and hope that those seeking to use the judiciary to frustrate the Government take note and withdraw their cases.”

Read more:

Boris Johnson gears up for another Commons battle as MPs attempt to block no-deal

In a hearing on Tuesday, it was revealed the Government appeared to consider suspending Parliament as early as mid-August.

This was two weeks before publicly announcing the move and despite Mr Johnson’s spokesman then claiming any suggestion of prorogation was “entirely false”.

Responding for the Government, David Johnston QC, said: “The proper forum for these matters to be scrutinised is the political forum.

“Those who make decisions that don’t go down well in the political forum will be held to account there – either in Parliament or, ultimately, by the electorate.”

The ruling was announced as MPs prepared to vote on whether to support a bill that could force the PM to seek an extension rather than leave the EU without a deal.

Additional reporting from PA

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What time is the Brexit vote? When the results of the no-deal bill will be announced today, and what happens next

Boris Johnson is gearing up for another Commons battle after failing to crush a backbench rebellion by MPs trying to stop a no-deal Brexit. 

The Prime Minister attempted to thwart the plan from MPs to take over the Commons order paper today, but lost in a symbolic vote on Tuesday night. 

Twenty-one Tory rebels voted against Mr Johnson during the emergency motion and, in an unprecedented reaction from the Government, they were immediately sacked from the party.

Mr Johnson’s loss has left MPs to now put forward their own legislation, which could force the Prime Minister to seek a three-month Brexit extension from the EU if he has not secured a deal by the 31 October deadline.

What’s on the agenda today?

In yet another busy day in the Commons, here is what to watch out for:

Spending review

Normally this would be a huge story, especially given that it is the first official budget announcement of the relatively new Government.

Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid is preparing his first Spending Review (Photo: Reuters)

Chancellor Sajid Javid is expected to announce an additional £2bn of Brexit funding as well as extra money for a number of departments – much of which has already been announced by the Government.

This is expected to include:

£210m to offer training opportunities to frontline NHS staff

£1.8bn to improve patient care

£400m in education for 16 to 19-year-olds

A rise in salaries for new teachers to £30,000 by 2022-23

£5m for a new office to oversee the Government’s drive to deliver for veterans

£90m injection in the UK’s diplomatic connections across the globe

A boost to the defence budget

£60m extension to the “Great” campaign, which is aimed at increasing exports

An extra £46m to boost the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham

£13m to support preparations for the UK’s G7 presidency in 2021

Backbench Brexit bill

The European Union (Withdrawal) (no 6) Bill is due to be presented to Parliament by Labour former minister Hilary Benn.

If passed, it will require the Government to either reach a deal with the EU or gain Parliament’s approval for a no-deal Brexit.

If the Government does not do either of these by 19 October, the legislation will then require the Prime Minister to request another extension until the end of January.

Boris Johnson addresses the Commons (Photo: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor)

Snap election

The other key issue on the order paper today is whether or not the country is heading towards a snap election in mid-October.

Mr Johnson said he intended to treat the vote on Tuesday night as a confidence vote and, if he lost, he would attempt to call an election to secure his mandate for keeping no-deal Brexit on the negotiating table.

True to his word, a motion for calling an early general election will be debated and voted on late on Wednesday night.

How will today pan out?

Midday: Mr Johnson will take to the despatch box for the first Prime Minister’s Questions after the summer recess – and his first since becoming Prime Minister. Jeremy Corbyn and other opposition leaders will grill Mr Johnson.

12.45pm: The Chancellor is due to deliver his first spending review. There were suggestions that, following Tuesday’s drama, it could have been delivered in written form instead of the usual oral statement but the minister is now expected to address the Commons after PMQs is wrapped up.

The review will set out the Conservative Government’s 2020 to 2021 budgets for Whitehall departments.

2.45 pm: There will be time for a private members’ bill – presented by Hull MP Emma Hardy – on compulsory purchase orders.

3.00 pm: The rebel alliance of backbenchers will take over control of the Commons order paper and table their anti no-deal Brexit legislation.

The chamber will debate the bill, which has been designed with the aim of forcing the Government to seek another Brexit extension until the end of January if it cannot secure a deal or win approval for a no deal.

5.00 pm: MPs will vote on second reading of the bill.

5.15 pm: If the vote passes the bill will go on to the committee stage when any amendments may be discussed.

7.00 pm: There will be further votes expected on any possible amendments tabled – the number of which is not yet known.

The bill will then go on to its third reading. This stage could take up to a couple of hours depending on the number of amendments.

Once the bill has passed its third reading, it will go to the House of Lords for the next phase.

9.00 to 9.30 pm: Around this time Mr Johnson will table motion for snap election which will be debated on for 90 minutes before MPs vote.

10.30 to 11.00 pm: MPs will vote on whether to hold an early general election in mid-October.

Under the Fixed Term Parliament Act, at least two-thirds of MPs will need to vote in favour of an election for it to pass.

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Brexit vote result: Government defeated 328-301 as rebels win right to bring bill blocking no-deal Brexit

MPs trying to stop a no-deal Brexit have won a crucial Commons victory after their plan to tie Boris Johnson‘s hands against leaving without a deal cleared its first hurdle.

Mr Johnson reacted to the victory of the rebel MPs by accusing them of trying to frustrate Brexit and setting out plans for an early General Election.

The cross-party group of MPs, nicknamed the “Remain alliance”, succeeded in their bid to take over control of the Commons order paper to legislate against a no deal.

The motion, which was approved for emergency debate by Speaker John Bercow, was supported by 328 to 301 – a majority of 27.

Snap election

The result marks a significant defeat for Mr Johnson’s Government and paved the way for a possible snap general election in October.

Boris Johnson addresses the Commons (Photo: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor)

Mr Johnson said Parliament was “on the bring of wrecking any deal” that could be agreed with Brussels.

He said confirmed that he would be tabling a motion to call for an early general election in October.

This is a developing story which is being updated.

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Boris Johnson planned to prorogue parliament days before No 10 denied that it was considering it

Boris Johnson appears to have approved a plan to prorogue Parliament in September in secret documents days before Downing Street outright denied that was his strategy.

The Prime Minister announced last week that he planned to prorogue, or suspend, Parliament early in order to make way for a new Queen’s Speech – a move that lead to outrage from opposition MPs who accused him of blocking Brexit debate.

The announcement was made on 28 August, just three days after Downing Street had dismissed reports that Mr Johnson was planning to shut down parliament as “entirely false”.

But details have emerged through ongoing legal case which suggest the Government was considering suspending Parliament as early as mid-August.

Court documents

The Court of Session – Scotland’s highest civil court – is hearing a legal challenge which is arguing that Mr Johnson’s decision to suspend parliament was not legally his to make.

The court has seen a note, dated 15 August 2019, from Nikki da Costa, a former director of legislative affairs at Number 10, which asked whether an approach should be made to prorogue Parliament between 9 September and 14 October.

It’s understood to have been seen by Mr Johnson and his adviser Dominic Cummings, and the court heard that the note was ticked, with “yes” written next to it, although the author of the annotation was not disclosed.

PM ‘unable to speak the truth’

Aiden O’Neill QC, who is representing the MPs that brought the case against the government, said: “One presumes this was a document sent in the red box to the Prime Minister to be read at his leisure.”

Mr Johnson replied the following day with another handwritten note in which he described the brief September session – when MPs return between summer recess and conference recess – as a “rigmarole” merely designed to show MPs were “earning their crust”.

He also added that it should not be considered “shocking” to suspend Parliament.

Mr O’Neill said the documents showed the contentious suspension of Parliament was being considered considerably earlier than announced and argued the court had been misled by the Government.

He said the Prime Minister had a reputation that has been “characterised by incontinent mendacity, an unwillingness or inability to speak the truth”.

“This court was told nothing of that and was told in fact that this judicial review is academic, hypothetical and premature,” he said. “That is not true. This court and these petitioners were being actively misled.”

Questions over why Parliament was actually prorogued

He argued the real reason to suspend Parliament was to allow a no-deal Brexit to take place by removing proper scrutiny.

Mr O’Neill also said Mr Johnson was trying to govern as an “autocracy” using “one-man rule” by these attempts.

On 28 August the Queen met the Privy Council to approve the plan to prorogue Parliament early and reduce the number of days MPs would be sitting.

But just days earlier, on 25 August, a Government spokesman had said, whilst Number 10 officials ask for legal advice every day, “the claim that the Government is considering proroguing parliament in September in order to stop MPs debating Brexit is entirely false.”

David Johnston QC, representing the Government, said the arguments were “academic” as it was not for the courts to decide if Parliament can be prorogued.

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Phillip Lee: Former Tory MP defects to the Liberal Democrats, wiping out Boris Johnson’s majority

Former Tory MP Phillip Lee has defected to the Liberal Democrats, leaving Boris Johnson without a majority ahead of a crucial Commons vote.

The anti-Brexit Lib Dems announced just hours before the Commons showdown that the MP for Bracknell was the fourth new addition to the party.

In a scathing statement, Dr Lee accused the Prime Minister of leading a Government that was using “political manipulation, bullying and lies”.

The Government, which previously had a working majority of just one, now has no majority at all.

‘Feeding division and populism’

Dr Lee said he had become “dismayed” at his former party, which he said was “feeding division and populism” and had become “blinkered” in the direction it was trying to take the country.”

“This Conservative Government is aggressively pursuing a damaging Brexit in unprincipled ways,” he said.

“It is putting lives and livelihoods at risk unnecessarily and it is wantonly endangering the integrity of the United Kingdom. More widely, it is undermining our country’s economy, democracy and role in the world.

“It is using political manipulation, bullying and lies. And it is doing these things in a deliberate and considered way.”

The MP, who had been a member of the party for more than 27 years, said: “Those are not my values. I will not implicitly condone these things by being party to them.”

This story is being updated.

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Philip Hammond says he’ll support no-deal Brexit bill and promises ‘fight of a lifetime’ over any attempts to oust him

Philip Hammond has vowed to support an opposition bid to block no-deal Brexit despite government threats of having the whip withdrawn, and said he was prepared for the “fight of a lifetime” if Boris Johnson tried to oust him from the party.

The former Chancellor confirmed on Tuesday he intends to vote in favour of legislation tabled by opposition MPs, which is designed to block Mr Johnson from taking the UK out of the EU without an agreement, and said he believes it has enough support to pass.

The message to Tory MPs who choose to vote against the Government later today has been that rebels will face suspension from the party and deselection. Mr Hammond said Downing Street is “running a pretty aggressive operation” over the threats.

But Mr Hammond has insisted he plans “to defend my party” against hardliners, and said he is prepared to take legal action if the Prime Minister attempts to block him from standing in another election.

‘I will vote against PM’

MPs are preparing to vote on whether to hand over control of the Commons to backbenchers, who will then use the Parliamentary time to put forward legislation designed to block Mr Johnson pushing through a no deal Brexit.

Former chancellor Philip Hammond hit back at threats made to Tory MPs who have said they would vote against the Government’s no deal policy (Photo: PA Wire)

The Government has said if Mr Johnson loses the vote he will not have enough support to go ahead with his plan and therefore be left with no other option but to call an election.

Tory MPs considering voting in favour of the anti-no deal plan have been warned they will have the whip withdrawn and be barred from standing in the next election.

But Mr Hammond told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme he and several of his colleagues intended to vote for the motion regardless.

Tory MPs ‘incensed’

“Obviously the government whips have been running a pretty aggressive operation,” he said. “Threatening people, offering people inducements. But I think we will have the numbers.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that he would suspend any Tory MP who votes against him (Photo: PA Wire)

“Many colleagues have been incensed by the actions over the last week or so and I think there is a group of Conservatives who feel very strongly that now is the time when we have to put the national interest ahead of any threats to us personally or to our careers.”

The senior figure called it “rank hypocrisy” to have threatened rebel Tories with having the whip removed if they vote against the Government this week.

Mr Hammond, who has been MP for Runnymede and Weybridge since 1997, has already been re-selected as the candidate for any future election by his local constituency group.

‘This is my party’

He was asked whether Downing Street had the power to prevent him from standing as a Tory at the next election even though he had been chosen by his local team.

He said: “I don’t believe they do and there would certainly be the fight of a lifetime if they tried to.”

Boris Johnson and Philip Hammond, pictured at the Tory party conference in 2016, have clashed over Brexit (Photo: Getty)

Asked whether he would be prepared to take such a fight to the courts, he added: “Possibly. A lot of my colleagues have come under immense pressure. Some have them have responded to that by saying ‘Enough, I’m going’.

“That is not going to be my approach. This is my party. I have been a member of this party for 45 years.”

Swipe at Cummings

The former minister then took a swipe at Mr Johnson’s new right-hand man, Dominic Cummings, who is widely seen to be behind the party’s hardline stance. He said: “I am going to defend my party against incomers, entryists, who are trying to turn it from a broad church to narrow faction.

“People who are at the heart of this government, who are probably not even members of the Conservative Party, who care nothing about the future of the Conservative Party, I intend to defend my party against them.”

Dominic Cummings, special adviser for Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is believed to be behind his controversial tactics (Photo: Hannah McKay/ Reuters)

The former foreign secretary said it was his understanding that Mr Cummings was “not and never has been” a party member. “I haven’t heard a denial from Downing Street, but perhaps they will issue one if that is not the case,” he added.

Tory MPs hit back

Fellow Tory rebel, Dominic Grieve, who served as attorney general in David Cameron’s government, said threats made to MPs demonstrated Mr Johnson’s “ruthlessness” in power.

“This is undoubtedly a new ruthlessness on the part of the Prime Minister and I think for a broad church party like the Conservatives I think it bodes ill for us,” he said.

“I simply do not see the Conservative Party surviving in its current form if we continue behaving like this towards each other. This is now becoming a heavily ideological party being led in a way I don’t identify as being conservative at all.”

Read more:

How MPs are planning to stop Boris Johnson taking the UK out of the EU without a deal

Their comments were made after colleague Justine Greening, a former education secretary and remainer, launched a blistering attack on the Prime Minister as she announced her resignation from the Commons at the next election.

She said her fears that the Conservative Party is morphing into Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party had “come to pass” and accused the current leadership of “narrowing down” the party’s appeal.

Ms Greening and Mr Grieve will join Mr Hammond in voting for the legislation designed to delay Britain’s exit from the European Union if no agreement can be struck before 31 October.

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Brexit vote: MPs prepare to choose between no deal or a snap general election in Commons showdown

MPs are facing an historic Commons showdown as they prepare to decide whether to pave the way for a no-deal Brexit or a snap election in a matter of weeks.

As parliament returns after six weeks away, Boris Johnson is set to face off with opposition MPs and rebel Tories who are trying to put forward legislation that could block no deal and require him to delay Brexit again.

The Prime Minister has come down hard on rebels in his party, threatening them with deselection if they vote against him, and said he would push for a snap general election in October if the Government lost the vote.

But one of the most senior Tory rebels, former chancellor Philip Hammond, said Mr Johnson’s “threats” have not worked and the plan still has enough support to get it over the line.

Enough rebel support?

Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged MPs not to block a no deal and said he would call an election if they did (Photo: Getty)

Speaking on BBC’s Today Programme, Mr Hammond said: “Many colleagues have been incensed by some of the actions over the past week or so, and I think there is a group of Conservatives who feel very strongly that now is the time to put the national interest ahead of any threats to us personally or to our careers.

“I think there will be enough people for us to get this over the line today.

“All kinds of threats are being made, most notably to withdraw the whip, but these are threats being made by a Government, eight Cabinet members of which have themselves defied the Conservative whip this year on the issue of Brexit.

“It would be rank hypocrisy to withdraw the whip.”

Hammond said that the threats had not put him off supporting the bill (Getty Images)

If MPs support a plan today to to allow the cross-party group to seize control of Commons business, new legislation will be tabled on Wednesday.

The terms of the European Union (Withdrawal) (no 6) Bill, would force the Government to seek a delay to the UK’s withdrawal from the EU until 31 January in order to avoid leaving without a deal.

How will today pan out?

11.00 am-ish: This morning Jeremy Corbyn is expected to hold another meeting with his fellow opposition leaders as they map out their tactics ahead of tonight’s vote. Mr Johnson will also meet Tory rebels who may be persuaded to back him.

2.30 pm: The Commons returns from the summer recess. MPs will start with questions to the Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab.

3.30 pm: The new Liberal Democrat MP, Jane Dodds, will be sworn is as parliament’s newest addition.

This will be followed by any Urgent Questions and a statement from the Prime Minister on his recent visit to the G7 Summit. The statement will likely be a chance for MPs to grill Mr Johnson, which could last a couple of hours.

5.00 – 6.00 pm: The PM’s statement will be followed by Michael Gove providing an update on preparations to leave without a deal.

6.00 – 7.00 pm: An opposition MP will submit a Standing Order 24 for an emergency debate on no deal which is expected to include a vote which, if passed, could hand over control of the Commons order paper tomorrow to backbenchers.

Their plan would then be to table a bill designed to prevent the government from forcing through a no-deal Brexit. You can read more about how that plan would work here.

9.30 pm to 10.00 pm: MPs are expected to vote on this around now, with the vote likely to be counted after around 15 minutes.

If the rebels win the vote, the government is expected then put forward a motion for another vote on Wednesday as to whether to call snap election.

Election

In order for an election to be called, the motion would need the support of two-thirds of MPs under the provisions of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act.

But there are some concerns that the Prime Minister could try and alter the election date to delay it until after Brexit.

Labour has said it would support an election if it ruled out a no-deal Brexit.

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No-deal Brexit bill explained: How Hilary Benn’s plan to delay Brexit works, and what today’s vote really means

Opposition MPs, in conjunction with a crucial group of backbench Tory rebels, are pursuing a plan to try and prevent the UK from leaving the EU without a deal.

Labour said the legislation would be Parliament’s “last chance” to stop a “reckless and damaging” no deal and shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer urged the Commons to get behind it.

The plan could force the PM to seek a three-month extension from the EU if he has not secured a deal by the 31 October deadline.

But Boris Johnson said it would damage the UK’s chance of reaching a good deal with the EU and has threatened Tory MPs with deselection if they vote in favour of it.

John Bercow announces the result of the Brexit vote
John Bercow announces the result of the Brexit vote on Tuesday night (UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor)

The bill is being presented in Parliament on Wednesday after the Prime Minister lost a symbolic vote putting control of the House of Commons in the hands of the “Rebel Alliance” on Tuesday night.

Mr Johnson’s defeat exposed the divisions within the Conservative Party over Brexit, with the 21 Tory rebel MPs having the whip removed in punishment.

Taking control

The Standing Order 24 Motion allows MPs to take charge of the Commons order paper from Wednesday at 3pm onward in order to make time for the bill.

Under the plan the second reading would take from 3pm, followed by a vote at 5pm and a third reading vote at 7pm.

The motion ensures that, if the bill completes its passage through the Lords, the Commons has to make time for any Lords amendments to be debated, so that the bill can complete its passage through parliament.

If bill is passed then the Commons will be prevented from being adjourned on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday next week until the Speaker has announced it has received royal assent.

But, under the terms of the motion, if the bill clears the Commons but not the Lords a new version of the bill must be brought forward for debate on the second day of the new session of parliament.

What is in the legislation?

The European Union (Withdrawal) (no 6) Bill is being presented to Parliament by Labour former minister Hilary Benn.

It would requite the Government to either:

Reach a deal with the EU by 19 October; or

Gain Parliament’s approval for a no-deal Brexit by 19 October

If the Government does not do either of these by 19 October, the legislation would then require the Prime Minister to then writ to the EU to request another extension.

The date for this extension, as suggested in the proposed legislation, would be 31 January 2020.

If the EU suggests another date then the legislation requires the Prime Minister to accept this, unless the Commons votes against the proposed date.

Why are MPs doing this?

As things stand the UK would leave the EU without a deal on 31 October, unless a deal is agreed before this deadline.

Mr Johnson has remained determined to keep a no-deal Brexit a viable option and has said he would pursue this strategy even without the support of the majority of MPs.

The aim of the plan is to stop Mr Johnson from forcing a no-deal Brexit on MPs without the explicit consent of the Commons.

Labour MP Hilary Benn says Article 50 should be revoked rather than allowing a no-deal Brexit
Labour MP Hilary Benn is one of the opposition MPs behind the new plan [Photo: AFP/Getty]

Time for renegotiation

If he has not reached a deal by 19 October, opposition MPs aim to provide more time for further negotiations between the UK government and the EU in order to reach an agreement.

Alternatively an extension – which would need to be granted by all EU member states – would allow time for Parliament to seek to build a consensus on the way forward.

Read more:

David Gauke says there is a 95% chance of a no-deal if parliament doesn’t act against Boris Johnson this week

Mr Benn said: “The purpose of the Bill is to ensure that the UK does not leave the European Union on the 31 October without an agreement, unless Parliament consents.

“The Bill gives the Government time either to reach a new agreement with the European Union at the European Council meeting next month or to seek Parliament’s specific consent to leave the EU without a deal.

“If neither of these two conditions have been met, however, by 19th October – ie the day after the European Council meeting concludes – then the Prime Minister must send a letter to the president of the European Council requesting an Article 50 extension until 31 January 2020.”

Mr Benn added: “If the European Council agrees to an extension to the 31 January 2020, then the Prime Minister must immediately accept that extension.

“If the European Council proposes an extension to a different date then the Prime Minister must accept that extension within two days, unless the House of Commons rejects it.”

Mr Starmer said: “This Bill will stop Boris Johnson forcing through a reckless and damaging no deal Brexit on 31 October.

“This week could be Parliament’s last chance to stop a no-deal Brexit. I am urging all MPs to act in the national interest and support this Bill.”

Dismissed by PM

Mr Johnson urged MPs not to vote for another “pointless extension” to Brexit and already warned Tory rebels that if they rebel against him they could face being chucked out the party.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged MPs not to block a no deal (Photo: Getty)

In a speech outside 10 Downing Street, the Prime Minister said blocking a no deal would hinder further talks with the EU on a new deal.

He warned that MPs would “chop the legs out” from the UK position if they backed a Brexit extension and stressed there were “no circumstances” in which he would personally seek a delay.

Downing Street sources then confirmed that Mr Johnson would table a motion proposing an early general election if the Government is defeated over the bill.

This election is expected to be scheduled for mid-October.

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