Tory HQ allows members to voice support for other parties on Thursday following Heseltine case

Following his disclosure in the Sunday Times at the weekend that he will vote Liberal Democrat at the European election taking place on Thursday, Tory peer Lord Heseltine has had the Conservative whip suspended in the House of Lords. Following a meeting with the Government Chief Whip in the Lords earlier tonight, a Conservative spokesman […]

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Following his disclosure in the Sunday Times at the weekend that he will vote Liberal Democrat at the European election taking place on Thursday, Tory peer Lord Heseltine has had the Conservative whip suspended in the House of Lords.

Following a meeting with the Government Chief Whip in the Lords earlier tonight, a Conservative spokesman said:

“Lord Heseltine has given more than half a century of service to the Conservative Party and his long-standing and sincerely held views on Europe are well understood. But, with his long experience, he will know that publicly endorsing the candidates of an another party is not compatible with taking the Conservative whip in Parliament.

“As a result, the Chief Whip in the House of Lords has informed Lord Heseltine that he will have the Conservative whip suspended. This will be reviewed if he is willing to support Conservative candidates at future elections.”

However, despite Tory HQ issuing a warning last month that “endorsement of any other political party is incompatible with membership of the party,” I can disclose that the former Deputy Prime Minister’s membership of the Conservative Party will not be suspended and he will not be subject to any further disciplinary investigation, following a meeting of the Party Board at Conservative Campaign Headquarters (CCHQ) today.

It was a regular meeting of the party’s governing body which by coincidence occurred the day after Heseltine’s intervention in the Sunday Times in which he confided that he will “lend” his support to the Lib Dems on Thursday because of “the Government’s position on Brexit”.

A source from the Board tells me it was decided that he could remain a Conservative member because he had merely stated his personal preference for supporting another party rather than actively campaigning for another party or encouraging others to follow suit – actions which would have resulted in disciplinary action.

“It’s a pretty fine line, but technically he has not gone over the line,” adds my source.

I gather that there was even discussion that the CCHQ-issued guidance contradicts what is written in the party constitution.

The ConservativeHome website’s regular survey of Tory party members earlier in the month found that 60% of them intended voting for The Brexit Party on Thursday.

But tonight’s news would suggest that, following Rebecca Ryan’s call on BrexitCentral, the Conservative Party will effectively turn a blind eye to any rank-and-file party member simply declaring their support for another party at Thursday’s election (although not if they are deemed to be encouraging others to vote for anyone other than Conservative candidates).

Nonetheless, today’s events would appear to confirm that publicly advocating voting for another party is not compatible with retaining the Conservative whip for those holding public office.

CCHQ has not yet provided me with a further formal statement on the matter.

Photocredit: Julian Mason

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Theresa May suggests her “no deal is better than a bad deal” mantra only applied “in the abstract”

Yesterday afternoon Theresa May appeared before the Liaison Committee of Select Committee Chairs, following what was probably the dullest session of Prime Minister’s Questions that I can remember for a long time, with Brexit not even being raised by a single MP during the 50-minute session. But Brexit took up most of the 90-minute session […]

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Yesterday afternoon Theresa May appeared before the Liaison Committee of Select Committee Chairs, following what was probably the dullest session of Prime Minister’s Questions that I can remember for a long time, with Brexit not even being raised by a single MP during the 50-minute session.

But Brexit took up most of the 90-minute session with the Committee Chairs and despite someone close to May confiding to me beforehand that she had “no intention of creating any news”, there were several extremely telling exchanges.

To many observers it was the day when May buried her erstwhile mantra that “no deal is better than a bad deal”, with her saying in her opening statement that in her view the “only acceptable” choice before MPs was “to form a majority to ratify the withdrawal agreement”.

Then, challenged by Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee Chair Sir Bernard Jenkin as to whether she would contemplate leaving the EU of her own choice without a Withdrawal Agreement, she used the following formulation of words:

I stand by the references I have made in the past that no deal is better than a bad deal, but I actually happen to think that we have a good deal. When I first made that reference, I was talking in the abstract — it was at Lancaster House. We now are no longer talking in the abstract; we are talking against the background of a negotiated deal, hard fought, that I believe is a good deal for the United Kingdom. That is why I say — and it remains the Government’s position — that we will continue to work to leave with a deal.”

Watch a clip of that here.

Welsh Affairs Committee Chair David TC Davies later took up the theme in a series of straight questions to which simply no straight answer was forthcoming. I think it’s worth reproducing the transcript to comprehend the level of evasiveness on display:

Davies: If you don’t get what you want, which is the Withdrawal Agreement passed — which I personally, as a loyal backbencher, have always supported — and if we are unsuccessful in persuading our colleagues to support that, would your preference be a no-deal Brexit or to remain in the European Union?

May: My view is we should leave the European Union because that is what the British people…

Davies: But we may not get what we want. We may have to choose between things that we don’t want, and the choice may be…

May: I think that we should leave the European Union, and my job is to try to make sure that we leave the European Union with as much of what we want as possible.

Davies: As we have just agreed, we are not necessarily going to get what we want. You and I would both like the Withdrawal Agreement to pass, but if we don’t get that, would you be happy to support a no-deal Brexit?

May: As I have just said, I believe that the important thing for us is to deliver on the result of the referendum and that means leaving the European Union, but I hope that we can both…

Davies: Can I turn the question around then, because I think this is important? I detect a change in Government policy here. Can I conclude from what you are saying to me that you would not support a no-deal Brexit under any circumstances?

May: The position of the Government is that the best option for the United Kingdom is to leave with a deal. That is what I believe. That is what I’m working for. That is what the Government have been working for.  I believe that we should leave the European Union. I believe that it is important to deliver on the result of the referendum. I believe we’re also in a set of circumstances where Parliament has made it clear that in the circumstances where it looked as if no deal was happening, Parliament would act again to try to ensure that there wasn’t a no-deal situation. I would have hoped that we could all just agree that we recognise, as you do, that the Withdrawal Agreement doesn’t give everybody what they want, but that actually leaving with it is the best option for the UK.

There then followed another to and fro between Davies and the Prime Minister where again no question was knowingly answered:

Davies: Do you think that you have been undermined by members of your own Cabinet who have suggested semi-publicly that we couldn’t leave without a deal?

May: Parliament has said that they don’t want us to leave without a deal. That is the reality.

Davies: But members of your Cabinet — do you think they have undermined you?

May: I think that what is important is that we work to deliver Government policy, which is that we leave — that the preference is to leave with a deal and we work to leave with a deal.

Davies: It was Government policy to leave by 29th March. The failure to leave by that date is a failure, isn’t it? It is a failure.

May: I wanted to leave on 29th March. I voted to leave on 29th March. Others voted to leave on 29th March. Sadly, not sufficient numbers in the House voted to leave on 29th March.

Davies: But it is a failure, isn’t it?

May: Well, people wanted us to leave on 29th March. We wanted to leave. We weren’t able to achieve that. What we must not fail in is leaving the European Union. We must ensure that we deliver on leaving the European Union. But as we’ve said, and as you’ve indicated you agree with, it is better to do that with a deal.

Watch a clip of those exchanges here.

Earlier in the session, Sir Bernard also put the Prime Minister on the spot to challenge her with the suggestion that she was “under no legally binding obligation of any kind” to accept the extensions to the Article 50 period offered to the UK by the EU. In respect of the first extension, she said “the Government took a decision that it was right and appropriate at that time to accept that extension”. Then, following the passing of that legislation to mandate her to seek the further extension, Sir Bernard pointed out to her that “You were obliged to seek an extension, but you were not obliged to accept an extension”. But she refused to accept that, replying: “I think if one is obliged to seek an extension, the expectation is that one is going to accept an extension”. Click here to watch that exchange.

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Former ministers to chair new initiative pursuing alternative arrangements for the Irish border

This morning sees the launch of a new initiative to develop “credible and practical alternative arrangements relating to the Irish border that can be delivered in a timely fashion to ensure that the UK retains full flexibility in its future negotiations with the European Union”. The Alternative Arrangements Commission is to be co-chaired by former […]

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This morning sees the launch of a new initiative to develop “credible and practical alternative arrangements relating to the Irish border that can be delivered in a timely fashion to ensure that the UK retains full flexibility in its future negotiations with the European Union”.

The Alternative Arrangements Commission is to be co-chaired by former International Trade Minister, Greg Hands, and Treasury Committee Chair and former Cabinet minister, Nicky Morgan, and will be a cross-party venture with yet-to-be-identified representatives from across the political spectrum, with a view to producing a report in June.

But, intriguingly, it has not been established by the Government – which some might suggest ought to be working night and day on this very issue – but rather Prosperity UK, the organisation co-founded by Sir Paul Marshall to bring together business leaders, academics and policy-makers to seek solutions to Brexit issues and look constructively at the UK’s post-Brexit future.

The House of Commons may have rejected the Government’s Brexit deal three times and then every proposal tabled during the ‘indicative votes’ process before Easter, but lest we forget that back on 29th January, MPs did support by 317 votes to 301 (majority: 16) the proposal from Sir Graham Brady (the Brady Amendment) to back the Withdrawal Agreement subject to the Northern Ireland backstop being “replaced with alternative arrangements to avoid a hard border”. It is indeed the only Brexit proposal to have enjoyed a parliamentary majority.

The Commission’s aim, therefore, is to build upon the Brady Amendment, working within the parameters of the Withdrawal Agreement, to seek solutions that are both realistic and sustainable while continuing to protect the Good Friday Agreement. Its principal objective will be to develop detailed proposals to avoid physical infrastructure at the border via “consideration of comprehensive customs cooperation arrangements, facilitative arrangements and technologies,” as was described within the Joint Instrument relating to the Withdrawal Agreement agreed in Strasbourg in March.

A press release announcing the establishment of the Commission provided the following further details:

The Commission’s work seeks to create further material for parliament to debate, to highlight to our European partners that there is an ongoing parliamentary majority for the Withdrawal Agreement provided that a template for alternative arrangements can be agreed. It should be noted that the work of the Commission will be compatible with any of the EU-UK future relationship proposals currently under consideration.

The Commission has engaged a Technical Panel comprising border and customs experts, practitioners and lawyers with detailed knowledge of trade, business and community relationships in Ireland as well as the EU, UK and international trade regulations in order to create draft processes and procedures to fulfil these goals. In addition, the Commission will engage with established technology providers in order to develop a comprehensive set of solutions and timelines for review.

Nine working groups have been created covering topics including the border and the movement of people in the context of the Good Friday Agreement, Tax, Sanitary and Phytosanitary standards, Small Traders and Trusted Trader Schemes. As part of the Commission’s work, a consultative conference will be held in London before the publication of its report. Further events are planned in other European jurisdictions to communicate the Commission’s recommendations.

Explaining the decision to establish the Commission, Prosperity UK Co-founder Sir Paul Marshall said:

“It is clear that the real Brexit logjam is around managing the Irish border and thereby eliminating the need for the Backstop. Our intention is to bring people together and to find practical solutions to this complex and emotive issue, drawing upon the expertise of some of the world’s best border experts.”

Commission Co-Chair Nicky Morgan – who was previously involved in the Government’s Alternative Arrangements Working Group which considered some of these issues in February – explained:

“The work of this Commission is hugely important. Implementation of suitable border arrangements for Ireland are vital not only to fulfil the terms of the Good Friday Agreement, but also key to agreeing a successful future UK relationship with the European Union, whatever happens in the withdrawal phase and however that future relationship is formulated. The EU have already indicated a desire to get on to discussing alternative arrangements and so we should try to do that.”

Her Co-Chair, Greg Hands, added:

“Alternative Arrangements were a key part of the Brady Amendment, the only Brexit proposal to have passed the House of Commons. I am looking forward to using my background to work with a wide variety of MPs and experts to help move this work forward and explore in detail how these alternative arrangements can work.”

 

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Theresa May and EU agree flexible extension to Article 50 period until 31st October 2019

Here is the text of Theresa May’s statement just delivered at the conclusion of the emergency European Council meeting: I have just met with Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council, where I agreed an extension to the Brexit process to the end of October at the latest.  I continue to believe we need […]

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Here is the text of Theresa May’s statement just delivered at the conclusion of the emergency European Council meeting:

I have just met with Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council, where I agreed an extension to the Brexit process to the end of October at the latest.  I continue to believe we need to leave the EU, with a deal, as soon as possible.

And vitally, the EU have agreed that the extension can be terminated when the Withdrawal Agreement has been ratified — which was my key request of my fellow leaders.

For example, this means that, if we are able to pass a deal in the first three weeks of May, we will not have to take part in European Elections and will officially leave the EU on Saturday, 1st June.

During the course of the extension, the European Council is clear that the UK will continue to hold full membership rights, as well as its obligations. As I said in the room tonight, there is only a single tier of EU membership, with no conditionality attached beyond existing treaty obligations.

Let me conclude by saying this. I know that there is huge frustration from many people that I had to request this extension.  The UK should have left the EU by now and I sincerely regret the fact that I have not yet been able to persuade Parliament to approve a deal which would allow the UK to leave in a smooth and orderly way.

But the choices we now face are stark and the timetable is clear.

So we must now press on at pace with our efforts to reach a consensus on a deal that is in the national interest.  Tomorrow I will be making a statement to the House of Commons.  Further talks will also take place between the Government and the Opposition to seek a way forward.

I do not pretend the next few weeks will be easy or that there is a simple way to break the deadlock in Parliament. But we have a duty as politicians to find a way to fulfil the democratic decision of the Referendum, deliver Brexit and move our country forward.

Nothing is more pressing or more vital.======================

What was agreed==========================

The key points of the agreement are as follows:

  • Flexible extension of the Article 50 period that can only last until 31st October 2019, although if the Withdrawal Agreement is ratified by the UK and EU before then, Brexit day becomes the first day of the following month.
  • The extension cannot be allowed to undermine “the regular functioning of the Union and its institutions” so if the UK has not ratified the Withdrawal Agreement by 22nd May, it must hold European Parliament elections on 23rd May (and if the UK fails to live up to this obligation, Brexit occurs on 1st June 2019.
  • The Withdrawal Agreement cannot be re-opened and “any unilateral commitment, statement or other act should be compatible with the letter and the spirit of the Withdrawal Agreement and must not hamper its implementation”.
  • If the position of the UK were “to evolve”, then the European Council “is prepared to reconsider the Political Declaration on the future relationship”.
  • During the extension, the UK remains an EU Member State with full rights and obligations, and has a right to revoke its Article 50 notification at any time.
  • The principle of sincere cooperation will continue to apply to the UK and during the extension the UK will “refrain from any measure which could jeopardise the attainment of the Union’s objectives, in particular when participating in the decision-making processes of the Union”.
  • The European Council will review progress at its meeting in June 2019.

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Go on, Theresa, surprise us: Stand up to Brussels tonight and embrace a clean break on Friday

It’s another pivotal day for Brexit. After Prime Minister’s Questions at lunchtime, Theresa May will head to Brussels for tonight’s emergency European Council meeting where she will plead with her 27 counterparts for another extension to the Article 50 period, to confirm yet another delay to our departure from the European Union.  I think the […]

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It’s another pivotal day for Brexit. After Prime Minister’s Questions at lunchtime, Theresa May will head to Brussels for tonight’s emergency European Council meeting where she will plead with her 27 counterparts for another extension to the Article 50 period, to confirm yet another delay to our departure from the European Union. 

I think the public are looking on with increasing disbelief as, nearly three years after the referendum, deadlines for leaving the EU come and go and keep getting pushed back. We are told the government will have to spend in the region of £100 million of our money holding elections to the European Parliament next month. People see a Prime Minister unable to get a majority of her own MPs to back her strategy, as evidenced by yesterday’s Commons vote where less than 43% of Tory MPs backed her proposal for an Article 50 extension until the end of June. They see the cross-party talks between Government and Opposition seemingly going nowhere. And with senior European figures arrogantly encouraging the UK simply to reverse its decision to leave the EU, they see Brussels making the process of leaving as difficult as possible, with EU intransigence on a range of issues effectively leaving the UK as supplicant in the exit negotiations.

This cannot go on. And if the British Prime Minister tonight accepts a series of conditions on a lengthy Article 50 extension the EU wants to impose on the UK, it would not only be a further embarrassment and humiliation for Theresa May personally, but also for us as a nation collectively.

The Prime Minister has now said on a number of occasions that we can’t leave without a deal because MPs have indicated they don’t want a no-deal Brexit. But MPs have also repeatedly rejected the Withdrawal Agreement that she and Olly Robbins have negotiated, yet she continues to insist that it remains the only way forward. MPs have also rejected the idea of another referendum, a UK-EU customs union and a whole range of other options. 

The EU has pleaded to know what MPs would actually support and of course there is one thing that the House of Commons did vote for: they backed the Brady Amendment which supported the Withdrawal Agreement subject to the hated backstop being replaced with alternative arrangements. But did the EU take this on board and make alternative proposals along those lines? No. Non. Nein. The EU has intransigently failed to budge a centimetre (or, should I say, an inch).

The default position in law as of today is that we leave the European Union without a deal on Friday night. Support for doing so is growing by the day among the public.

The only reason I reluctantly came to the view that MPs should let the Withdrawal Agreement pass at the third time of asking was because of my very real fear that the Remain-dominated House of Commons would somehow prevent a no-deal Brexit if May’s deal were not passed.

Yet over the last few days, when the House of Commons did seize control of the parliamentary agenda, all MPs could do was pass Yvette Cooper’s Bill to mandate the Prime Minister to seek an Article 50 extension. Despite claims to the contrary from those who ought to know better (I’m looking at you, Sir Keir), the Cooper Bill does not prevent No Deal and changes very little, as Martin Howe QC explains in the Telegraph today.

The Bill merely mandates May to ask for an extension, which she will do; it does not say she has to accept whatever counter-offer the EU may make, especially if it is a far longer extension with numerous strings attached.

I therefore believe it is time for our Prime Minister to tell Brussels that enough is enough. The Government has spent around £4.2 billion planning for a no-deal scenario precisely because, as Theresa May repeatedly reminded us, no deal is better than a bad deal. And what’s on offer from the EU is a bad deal. As Dover MP and Remain-backer in 2016 Charlie Elphicke writes for BrexitCentral today, we are prepared for a no-deal Brexit on Friday and while there would doubtless be some bumps in the road, they are not insurmountable. And if you don’t want to take his word for it, then it is worth re-reading the recent Telegraph article from Chris Heaton-Harris who was the Brexit minister responsible for no-deal planning until his resignation last week.  

We are told that the Prime Minister’s opposition to No Deal hinges on her fear that it could destroy the Union of the United Kingdom through the consequences of a hard border being imposed between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. But a hard border is simply not going to happen, as has now been declared on numerous occasions both by the Irish Government and those in Brussels.

As I said above, the public appetite for No Deal is growing by the day. And if tonight Theresa May embraced No Deal by refusing whatever offer with strict conditions that the EU makes her, she could at a stroke restore her reputation as a politician willing to stand up for the UK and take tough decisions (rather than kicking cans down the road), by standing up to those in Brussels who evidently don’t have the UK’s best interests at heart.

And I know the interests of the Conservative Party don’t concern all BrexitCentral readers. But with Tory ratings in freefall and a punitive backlash beckoning at the ballot box at local and European elections if Brexit has not been delivered, she could prevent her party falling into a potentially fatal abyss by making a bold move tonight.

Will she do it? All the evidence based on past form is that she will not. But we can hope. Go on, Theresa. Surprise us; confound your critics. Show some steel in Brussels tonight, resolve to stop being a supplicant at the European negotiating table, draw a line under this painful process and explain that we’ll make a clean break from the EU on Friday. The UK will have properly regained its independence – and you might just save your party in the process.

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MPs back Article 50 extension until 30th June but 99 Tories oppose it – how every MP voted

The House of Commons spent 90 minutes on Tuesday debating a motion – under the auspices of Yvette Cooper’s EU Withdrawal Act which came into force on Monday night – agreeing to Theresa May seeking an extension to the Article 50 period until 30th June 2019 at the European Council meeting today (Wednesday 10th April). […]

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The House of Commons spent 90 minutes on Tuesday debating a motion – under the auspices of Yvette Cooper’s EU Withdrawal Act which came into force on Monday night – agreeing to Theresa May seeking an extension to the Article 50 period until 30th June 2019 at the European Council meeting today (Wednesday 10th April).

The motion was passed by 420 votes to 110 (majority: 310).

420 MPs voted for the motion (422 including two tellers), including only 133 Conservative MPs, 223 Labour MPs, 33 SNP MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, along with the MPs from Plaid Cymru, the Green Party and 6 Independents.

Meanwhile, 110 MPs voted against the Bill (112 if you include the two tellers), including 99 Conservative rebels, 3 Labour MPs, 9 DUP MPs and 1 Independent.

There was a remarkably large abstention rate among Tory MPs with no fewer than 80 not voting in the division. While some may have been on parliamentary or government business elsewhere – such as Theresa May herself who was in meetings on the continent – there were a number of senior government figures not voting, such as Liam Fox, Andrea Leadsom, Chris Grayling and Geoffrey Cox. Astonishingly, I count no fewer than ten of the 17 government whips who abstained from voting – Chris Pincher, Mark Spencer, Paul Maynard, Craig Whittaker, Rebecca Harris, Nusrat Ghani, Iain Stewart, Amanda Milling, Michelle Donelan and Wendy Morton.

Below are full lists of which MPs voted for and against the motion, along with those who did not vote at all (although NB it is impossible to know whether they deliberately abstained, were away from Westminster on parliamentary business elsewhere or were ill etc.).

THE 422 MPs WHO BACKED THE MOTION=================

 

Conservative

  1. Bim Afolami
  2. Peter Aldous
  3. Edward Argar
  4. Victoria Atkins
  5. Harriett Baldwin
  6. Steve Barclay
  7. Henry Bellingham
  8. Guto Bebb
  9. Richard Benyon
  10. Paul Beresford
  11. Peter Bottomley
  12. Andrew Bowie
  13. Karen Bradley
  14. Steve Brine
  15. James Brokenshire
  16. Robert Buckland
  17. Alex Burghart
  18. Alistair Burt
  19. Alun Cairns
  20. James Cartlidge
  21. Alex Chalk
  22. Jo Churchill
  23. Greg Clark
  24. Colin Clark
  25. Ken Clarke
  26. James Cleverly
  27. Thérèse Coffey
  28. Alberto Costa
  29. Glyn Davies
  30. Jonathan Djanogly
  31. Leo Docherty
  32. Oliver Dowden
  33. David Duguid
  34. Alan Duncan
  35. Philip Dunne
  36. Michael Ellis
  37. Tobias Ellwood
  38. Mark Field
  39. Vicky Ford
  40. Kevin Foster
  41. Lucy Frazer
  42. George Freeman
  43. Mike Freer
  44. Mark Garnier
  45. David Gauke
  46. Nick Gibb
  47. John Glen
  48. Robert Goodwill
  49. Michael Gove
  50. Luke Graham
  51. Richard Graham
  52. Bill Grant
  53. Helen Grant
  54. Damian Green
  55. Justine Greening
  56. Dominic Grieve
  57. Sam Gyimah
  58. Kirstene Hair
  59. Luke Hall
  60. Philip Hammond
  61. Stephen Hammond
  62. Matt Hancock
  63. Richard Harrington
  64. Simon Hart
  65. Oliver Heald
  66. Peter Heaton-Jones
  67. Damian Hinds
  68. Simon Hoare
  69. George Hollingbery
  70. Kevin Hollinrake
  71. Nigel Huddleston
  72. Jeremy Hunt
  73. Nick Hurd
  74. Alister Jack (Teller)
  75. Margot James
  76. Sajid Javid
  77. Robert Jenrick
  78. Jo Johnson
  79. Andrew Jones
  80. Gillian Keegan
  81. Seema Kennedy
  82. Stephen Kerr
  83. Mark Lancaster
  84. Jeremy Lefroy
  85. Oliver Letwin
  86. David Lidington
  87. Patrick McLoughlin
  88. Mark Menzies
  89. Huw Merriman
  90. Anne Milton
  91. Andrew Mitchell
  92. Penny Mordaunt
  93. Nicky Morgan
  94. David Morris
  95. David Mundell
  96. Andrew Murrison
  97. Bob Neill
  98. Sarah Newton
  99. Caroline Nokes
  100. Neil O’Brien
  101. Guy Opperman
  102. Mark Pawsey
  103. John Penrose
  104. Claire Perry
  105. Chris Philp
  106. Rebecca Pow
  107. Mark Prisk
  108. Jeremy Quin (Teller)
  109. Will Quince
  110. Amber Rudd
  111. David Rutley
  112. Antoinette Sandbach
  113. Paul Scully
  114. Andrew Selous
  115. Alok Sharma
  116. Keith Simpson
  117. Chris Skidmore
  118. Julian Smith
  119. Nicholas Soames
  120. Caroline Spelman
  121. John Stevenson
  122. Rory Stewart
  123. Gary Streeter
  124. Mel Stride
  125. Graham Stuart
  126. Justin Tomlinson
  127. David Tredinnick
  128. Elizabeth Truss
  129. Ed Vaizey
  130. Robin Walker
  131. Ben Wallace
  132. Gavin Williamson
  133. Jeremy Wright

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Nick Boles
  2. Sylvia Hermon
  3. Ivan Lewis
  4. Stephen Lloyd
  5. Chris Williamson
  6. John Woodcock

Independent Group

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Ann Coffey
  4. Mike Gapes
  5. Chris Leslie
  6. Joan Ryan
  7. Gavin Shuker
  8. Angela Smith
  9. Anna Soubry
  10. Chuka Umunna
  11. Sarah Wollaston

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Kevin Barron
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nick Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Alan Campbell
  26. Dan Carden
  27. Sarah Champion
  28. Jenny Chapman
  29. Bambos Charalambous
  30. Ann Clwyd
  31. Vernon Coaker
  32. Julie Cooper
  33. Rosie Cooper
  34. Yvette Cooper
  35. Jeremy Corbyn
  36. Neil Coyle
  37. David Crausby
  38. Mary Creagh
  39. Stella Creasy
  40. Jon Cruddas
  41. John Cryer
  42. Judith Cummings
  43. Alex Cunningham
  44. Jim Cunningham
  45. Janet Daby
  46. Nic Dakin
  47. Wayne David
  48. Geraint Davies
  49. Marsha De Cordova
  50. Gloria de Piero
  51. Thangam Debbonaire
  52. Emma Dent Coad
  53. Annaliese Dodds
  54. Stephen Doughty
  55. Peter Dowd
  56. Jack Dromey
  57. Rosie Duffield
  58. Angela Eagle
  59. Maria Eagle
  60. Clive Efford
  61. Julie Elliott
  62. Louise Ellman
  63. Chris Elmore
  64. Bill Esterson
  65. Christopher Evans
  66. Paul Farrelly
  67. Jim Fitzpatrick
  68. Colleen Fletcher
  69. Caroline Flint
  70. Vicky Foxcroft
  71. Gill Furniss
  72. Hugh Gaffney
  73. Barry Gardiner
  74. Ruth George
  75. Preet Gill
  76. Mary Glindon
  77. Roger Godsiff
  78. Helen Goodman
  79. Kate Green
  80. Lilian Greenwood
  81. Margaret Greenwood
  82. Nia Griffith
  83. John Grogan
  84. Andrew Gwynne
  85. Louise Haigh
  86. Fabian Hamilton
  87. David Hanson
  88. Emma Hardy
  89. Harriet Harman
  90. Carolyn Harris
  91. Helen Hayes
  92. Sue Hayman
  93. John Healey
  94. Mark Hendrick
  95. Mike Hill
  96. Meg Hillier
  97. Margaret Hodge
  98. Sharon Hodgson
  99. Kate Hollern
  100. George Howarth
  101. Rupa Huq
  102. Imran Hussain
  103. Dan Jarvis
  104. Diana Johnson
  105. Darren Jones
  106. Gerald Jones
  107. Graham Jones
  108. Kevan Jones
  109. Ruth Jones
  110. Sarah Jones
  111. Susan Elan Jones
  112. Michael Kane
  113. Barbara Keeley
  114. Elizabeth Kendall
  115. Afzal Khan
  116. Gerard Killen
  117. Stephen Kinnock
  118. Peter Kyle
  119. Lesley Laird
  120. David Lammy
  121. Ian Lavery
  122. Karen Lee
  123. Emma Lewell-Buck
  124. Clive Lewis
  125. Tony Lloyd
  126. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  127. Ian Lucas
  128. Holly Lynch
  129. Justin Madders
  130. Khalid Mahmood
  131. Shabana Mahmood
  132. Seema Malhotra
  133. John Mann
  134. Gordon Marsden
  135. Sandy Martin
  136. Rachael Maskell
  137. Chris Matheson
  138. Steve McCabe
  139. Kerry McCarthy
  140. Andy McDonald
  141. Pat McFadden
  142. Conor McGinn
  143. Alison McGovern
  144. Catherine McKinnell
  145. Jim McMahon
  146. Ian Mearns
  147. Ed Miliband
  148. Madeleine Moon
  149. Jessica Morden
  150. Stephen Morgan
  151. Grahame Morris
  152. Ian Murray
  153. Alex Norris
  154. Melanie Onn
  155. Chi Onwurah
  156. Kate Osamor
  157. Albert Owen
  158. Stephanie Peacock
  159. Teresa Pearce
  160. Matthew Pennycook
  161. Toby Perkins
  162. Jess Phillips
  163. Bridget Phillipson
  164. Laura Pidcock
  165. Jo Platt
  166. Luke Pollard
  167. Stephen Pound
  168. Lucy Powell
  169. Yasmin Qureshi
  170. Faisal Rashid
  171. Angela Rayner
  172. Steve Reed
  173. Christina Rees
  174. Ellie Reeves
  175. Emma Reynolds
  176. Marie Rimmer
  177. Geoffrey Robinson
  178. Matt Rodda
  179. Danielle Rowley
  180. Chris Ruane
  181. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  182. Naz Shah
  183. Virendra Sharma
  184. Barry Sheerman
  185. Paula Sherriff
  186. Tulip Siddiq
  187. Dennis Skinner
  188. Andy Slaughter
  189. Ruth Smeeth
  190. Cat Smith
  191. Eleanor Smith
  192. Jeff Smith
  193. Laura Smith
  194. Nick Smith
  195. Owen Smith
  196. Gareth Snell
  197. John Spellar
  198. Keir Starmer
  199. Jo Stevens
  200. Wes Streeting
  201. Paul Sweeney
  202. Mark Tami
  203. Gareth Thomas
  204. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  205. Stephen Timms
  206. Jon Trickett
  207. Anna Turley
  208. Karl Turner
  209. Derek Twigg
  210. Stephen Twigg
  211. Liz Twist
  212. Keith Vaz
  213. Valerie Vaz
  214. Thelma Walker
  215. Tom Watson
  216. Catherine West
  217. Matt Western
  218. Alan Whitehead
  219. Martin Whitfield
  220. Paul Williams
  221. Phil Wilson
  222. Mohammad Yasin
  223. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Stewart McDonald
  25. Stuart McDonald
  26. John McNally
  27. Carol Monaghan
  28. Gavin Newlands
  29. Brendan O’Hara
  30. Tommy Sheppard
  31. Chris Stephens
  32. Alison Thewliss
  33. Philippa Whitford

THE 105 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*=======

 

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Lucy Allan
  3. Stuart Andrew
  4. Kemi Badenoch
  5. Jake Berry
  6. Jack Brereton
  7. Christopher Chope
  8. Damian Collins
  9. Robert Courts
  10. Geoffrey Cox
  11. Stephen Crabb
  12. Tracey Crouch
  13. David Davies
  14. Mims Davies
  15. Caroline Dinenage
  16. Michelle Donelan
  17. Nadine Dorries
  18. Jackie Doyle-Price
  19. Nigel Evans
  20. Michael Fallon
  21. Liam Fox
  22. Roger Gale
  23. Nusrat Ghani
  24. Chris Grayling
  25. Rebecca Harris
  26. Trudy Harrison
  27. John Hayes
  28. James Heappey
  29. Nick Herbert
  30. John Howell
  31. Caroline Johnson
  32. Marcus Jones
  33. Greg Knight
  34. Julian Knight
  35. Kwasi Kwarteng
  36. John Lamont
  37. Andrea Leadsom
  38. Phillip Lee
  39. Edward Leigh
  40. Brandon Lewis
  41. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  42. Jack Lopresti
  43. Jonathan Lord
  44. Rachel Maclean
  45. Alan Mak
  46. Kit Malthouse
  47. Paul Masterton
  48. Theresa May
  49. Paul Maynard
  50. Maria Miller
  51. Amanda Milling
  52. Damien Moore
  53. James Morris
  54. Wendy Morton
  55. Jesse Norman
  56. Matthew Offord
  57. Andrew Percy
  58. Christopher Pincher
  59. Daniel Poulter
  60. Victoria Prentis
  61. Douglas Ross
  62. Bob Seely
  63. Grant Shapps
  64. Alec Shelbrooke
  65. Chloe Smith
  66. Mark Spencer
  67. Andrew Stephenson
  68. Bob Stewart
  69. Iain Stewart
  70. Rishi Sunak
  71. Maggie Throup
  72. Kelly Tolhurst
  73. Thomas Tugendhat
  74. David Warburton
  75. Matt Warman
  76. Helen Whately
  77. Heather Wheeler
  78. Craig Whittaker
  79. Mike Wood
  80. Nadhim Zahawi

DUP

  1. Jeffrey Donaldson

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Kelvin Hopkins
  3. Jared O’Mara
  4. Fiona Onasanya

Labour

  1. Adrian Bailey
  2. Ruth Cadbury
  3. Tan Dhesi
  4. David Drew
  5. Yvonne Fovargue
  6. James Frith
  7. Helen Jones
  8. Siobhain McDonagh
  9. John McDonnell
  10. Liz McInnes
  11. Anna McMorrin
  12. Lisa Nandy
  13. Rachel Reeves
  14. Jonathan Reynolds
  15. Karin Smyth
  16. Alex Sobel
  17. Graham Stringer
  18. Emily Thornberry

SNP

  1. Angus MacNeil
  2. Pete Wishart

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on maternity/paternity leave or on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention.

THE 112 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE MOTION===============

 

Conservative

  1. Adam Afriyie
  2. David Amess
  3. Richard Bacon
  4. Steve Baker
  5. John Baron
  6. Bob Blackman
  7. Crispin Blunt
  8. Peter Bone
  9. Ben Bradley
  10. Graham Brady
  11. Suella Braverman
  12. Andrew Bridgen
  13. Fiona Bruce
  14. Conor Burns
  15. William Cash
  16. Maria Caulfield
  17. Rehman Chishti
  18. Simon Clarke (Teller)
  19. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  20. Chris Davies
  21. Philip Davies
  22. David Davis
  23. Steve Double
  24. Richard Drax
  25. James Duddridge
  26. Iain Duncan Smith
  27. Charlie Elphicke
  28. George Eustice
  29. David Evennett
  30. Michael Fabricant
  31. Mark Francois
  32. Marcus Fysh
  33. Cheryl Gillan (Teller)
  34. Zac Goldsmith
  35. James Gray
  36. Chris Green
  37. Andrew Griffiths
  38. Robert Halfon
  39. Greg Hands
  40. Mark Harper
  41. Chris Heaton-Harris
  42. Gordon Henderson
  43. Philip Hollobone
  44. Adam Holloway
  45. Eddie Hughes
  46. Ranil Jayawardena
  47. Bernard Jenkin
  48. Andrea Jenkyns
  49. Boris Johnson
  50. Gareth Johnson
  51. David Jones
  52. Daniel Kawczynski
  53. Pauline Latham
  54. Andrew Lewer
  55. Julian Lewis
  56. Julia Lopez
  57. Tim Loughton
  58. Craig Mackinlay
  59. Anne Main
  60. Scott Mann
  61. Stephen McPartland
  62. Esther McVey
  63. Johnny Mercer
  64. Stephen Metcalfe
  65. Nigel Mills
  66. Anne Marie Morris
  67. Sheryll Murray
  68. Neil Parish
  69. Priti Patel
  70. Owen Paterson
  71. Mike Penning
  72. Mark Pritchard
  73. Tom Pursglove
  74. Dominic Raab
  75. John Redwood
  76. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  77. Laurence Robertson
  78. Mary Robinson
  79. Andrew Rosindell
  80. Lee Rowley
  81. Henry Smith
  82. Royston Smith
  83. Julian Sturdy
  84. Desmond Swayne
  85. Hugo Swire
  86. Robert Syms
  87. Derek Thomas
  88. Ross Thomson
  89. Michael Tomlinson
  90. Craig Tracey
  91. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  92. Shailesh Vara
  93. Martin Vickers
  94. Theresa Villiers
  95. Charles Walker
  96. Giles Watling
  97. John Whittingdale
  98. Bill Wiggin
  99. William Wragg

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Paul Girvan
  4. Emma Little Pengelly
  5. Ian Paisley
  6. Gavin Robinson
  7. Jim Shannon
  8. David Simpson
  9. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Frank Field

Labour

  1. Ronnie Campbell
  2. Stephen Hepburn
  3. Kate Hoey

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/Mark Duffy

The post MPs back Article 50 extension until 30th June but 99 Tories oppose it – how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Yvette Cooper’s Bill to demand an Article 50 extension passed by a majority of 1 – how every MP voted

The House of Commons spent just a few hours yesterday passing all Commons stages of Yvette Cooper’s EU Withdrawal (No. 5) Bill, which seeks to prevent a no-deal Brexit by mandating Theresa May to seek an extension to the Article 50 period. You can watch our video highlights here.  Proceeding were only able to continue […]

The post Yvette Cooper’s Bill to demand an Article 50 extension passed by a majority of 1 – how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

The House of Commons spent just a few hours yesterday passing all Commons stages of Yvette Cooper’s EU Withdrawal (No. 5) Bill, which seeks to prevent a no-deal Brexit by mandating Theresa May to seek an extension to the Article 50 period. You can watch our video highlights here

Proceeding were only able to continue when the business motion was passed by 312 votes to 311 – a majority of one.

And just before 11.30pm last night MPs gave the Bill a Third Reading by 313 votes to 312 – another majority of one.  The Bill now has to proceed through its stages in the House of Lords.

313 MPs voted for the Bill (315 including two tellers), including 14 Conservatives, 231 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, along with the MPs from Plaid Cymru, the Green Party and 8 Independents.

Meanwhile, 312 MPs voted for the Bill (314 if you include the two tellers), including 292 Conservatives, 9 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 3 Independents.

Below are full lists of which MPs voted for and against the Bill at Third Reading, along with those who did not vote at all (although NB it is impossible to know whether they deliberately abstained, were away from Westminster on parliamentary business elsewhere or were ill etc.).

THE 315 MPs WHO BACKED THE THIRD READING=======

 

Conservative

  1. Guto Bebb
  2. Steve Brine
  3. Alistair Burt
  4. Ken Clarke
  5. Jonathan Djanogly
  6. Justine Greening
  7. Dominic Grieve
  8. Sam Gyimah
  9. Richard Harrington
  10. Phillip Lee
  11. Oliver Letwin
  12. Antoinette Sandbach
  13. Caroline Spelman
  14. Ed Vaizey

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Nick Boles
  2. Sylvia Hermon
  3. Ivan Lewis
  4. Stephen Lloyd
  5. Jared O’Mara
  6. Fiona Onasanya
  7. Chris Williamson
  8. John Woodcock

Independent Group

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Ann Coffey
  4. Mike Gapes
  5. Chris Leslie
  6. Joan Ryan
  7. Gavin Shuker
  8. Angela Smith
  9. Anna Soubry
  10. Chuka Umunna
  11. Sarah Wollaston

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nick Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Alan Campbell
  27. Dan Carden
  28. Sarah Champion
  29. Jenny Chapman
  30. Bambos Charalambous
  31. Ann Clwyd
  32. Vernon Coaker
  33. Julie Cooper
  34. Yvette Cooper
  35. Jeremy Corbyn
  36. Neil Coyle
  37. David Crausby
  38. Mary Creagh
  39. Stella Creasy
  40. Jon Cruddas
  41. John Cryer
  42. Judith Cummings
  43. Alex Cunningham
  44. Jim Cunningham
  45. Janet Daby
  46. Nic Dakin
  47. Wayne David
  48. Geraint Davies
  49. Marsha De Cordova
  50. Gloria de Piero
  51. Thangam Debbonaire
  52. Emma Dent Coad
  53. Tan Dhesi
  54. Annaliese Dodds
  55. Stephen Doughty
  56. Peter Dowd
  57. David Drew
  58. Jack Dromey
  59. Rosie Duffield
  60. Angela Eagle
  61. Maria Eagle
  62. Clive Efford
  63. Julie Elliott
  64. Louise Ellman
  65. Chris Elmore
  66. Bill Esterson
  67. Christopher Evans
  68. Paul Farrelly
  69. Jim Fitzpatrick
  70. Colleen Fletcher
  71. Yvonne Fovargue
  72. Vicky Foxcroft
  73. James Frith
  74. Gill Furniss
  75. Hugh Gaffney
  76. Barry Gardiner
  77. Ruth George
  78. Preet Gill
  79. Mary Glindon
  80. Roger Godsiff
  81. Helen Goodman
  82. Kate Green
  83. Lilian Greenwood
  84. Margaret Greenwood
  85. Nia Griffith
  86. John Grogan
  87. Andrew Gwynne
  88. Louise Haigh
  89. Fabian Hamilton
  90. David Hanson
  91. Emma Hardy
  92. Harriet Harman
  93. Carolyn Harris
  94. Helen Hayes
  95. Sue Hayman
  96. John Healey
  97. Mark Hendrick
  98. Mike Hill
  99. Meg Hillier
  100. Margaret Hodge
  101. Sharon Hodgson
  102. Kate Hollern
  103. George Howarth
  104. Rupa Huq
  105. Imran Hussain
  106. Dan Jarvis
  107. Diana Johnson
  108. Darren Jones
  109. Gerald Jones
  110. Graham Jones
  111. Helen Jones
  112. Kevan Jones
  113. Sarah Jones
  114. Susan Elan Jones
  115. Michael Kane
  116. Barbara Keeley
  117. Elizabeth Kendall
  118. Afzal Khan
  119. Gerard Killen
  120. Stephen Kinnock
  121. Peter Kyle
  122. Lesley Laird
  123. David Lammy
  124. Ian Lavery
  125. Karen Lee
  126. Emma Lewell-Buck
  127. Clive Lewis
  128. Tony Lloyd
  129. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  130. Ian Lucas
  131. Holly Lynch
  132. Justin Madders
  133. Khalid Mahmood
  134. Shabana Mahmood
  135. Seema Malhotra
  136. Gordon Marsden
  137. Sandy Martin
  138. Rachael Maskell
  139. Chris Matheson
  140. Steve McCabe
  141. Kerry McCarthy
  142. Siobhain McDonagh
  143. Andy McDonald
  144. John McDonnell
  145. Pat McFadden
  146. Conor McGinn
  147. Alison McGovern
  148. Liz McInnes
  149. Catherine McKinnell
  150. Jim McMahon
  151. Anna McMorrin
  152. Ian Mearns
  153. Ed Miliband
  154. Madeleine Moon
  155. Jessica Morden
  156. Stephen Morgan
  157. Grahame Morris
  158. Ian Murray
  159. Lisa Nandy
  160. Alex Norris
  161. Melanie Onn
  162. Chi Onwurah
  163. Kate Osamor
  164. Albert Owen
  165. Stephanie Peacock
  166. Teresa Pearce
  167. Matthew Pennycook
  168. Toby Perkins
  169. Jess Phillips
  170. Bridget Phillipson
  171. Laura Pidcock
  172. Jo Platt
  173. Luke Pollard
  174. Stephen Pound
  175. Lucy Powell
  176. Yasmin Qureshi
  177. Faisal Rashid
  178. Angela Rayner
  179. Steve Reed
  180. Christina Rees
  181. Ellie Reeves
  182. Rachel Reeves
  183. Emma Reynolds
  184. Jonathan Reynolds
  185. Marie Rimmer
  186. Geoffrey Robinson
  187. Matt Rodda
  188. Danielle Rowley
  189. Chris Ruane
  190. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  191. Naz Shah
  192. Virendra Sharma
  193. Barry Sheerman
  194. Paula Sherriff
  195. Tulip Siddiq
  196. Andy Slaughter
  197. Ruth Smeeth
  198. Cat Smith
  199. Eleanor Smith
  200. Jeff Smith (Teller)
  201. Laura Smith
  202. Nick Smith (Teller)
  203. Owen Smith
  204. Karin Smyth
  205. Alex Sobel
  206. John Spellar
  207. Keir Starmer
  208. Jo Stevens
  209. Wes Streeting
  210. Paul Sweeney
  211. Mark Tami
  212. Gareth Thomas
  213. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  214. Stephen Timms
  215. Jon Trickett
  216. Anna Turley
  217. Karl Turner
  218. Stephen Twigg
  219. Liz Twist
  220. Keith Vaz
  221. Valerie Vaz
  222. Thelma Walker
  223. Tom Watson
  224. Catherine West
  225. Matt Western
  226. Alan Whitehead
  227. Martin Whitfield
  228. Paul Williams
  229. Phil Wilson
  230. Mohammad Yasin
  231. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus MacNeil
  25. Stewart McDonald
  26. Stuart McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

THE 9 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*=======

 

Conservative

  1. George Freeman
  2. Jo Johnson
  3. Jeremy Lefroy
  4. Andrew Mitchell
  5. Nicky Morgan
  6. Derek Thomas

Labour

  1. Gareth Snell
  2. Emily Thornberry (known to be attending hospital with a child)
  3. Derek Twigg

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on maternity/paternity leave or on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention. One seat (Newport West) is currently vacant following the death of Paul Flynn.

THE 314 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE THIRD READING=======

 

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Adam Afriyie
  4. Peter Aldous
  5. Lucy Allan
  6. David Amess
  7. Stuart Andrew
  8. Edward Argar
  9. Victoria Atkins
  10. Richard Bacon
  11. Kemi Badenoch
  12. Steve Baker
  13. Harriett Baldwin
  14. Steve Barclay
  15. John Baron
  16. Henry Bellingham
  17. Richard Benyon
  18. Paul Beresford
  19. Jake Berry
  20. Bob Blackman
  21. Crispin Blunt
  22. Peter Bone
  23. Peter Bottomley
  24. Andrew Bowie
  25. Ben Bradley
  26. Karen Bradley
  27. Graham Brady
  28. Suella Braverman
  29. Jack Brereton
  30. Andrew Bridgen
  31. James Brokenshire
  32. Fiona Bruce
  33. Robert Buckland
  34. Alex Burghart
  35. Conor Burns
  36. Alun Cairns
  37. James Cartlidge
  38. William Cash
  39. Maria Caulfield
  40. Alex Chalk
  41. Rehman Chishti
  42. Christopher Chope
  43. Jo Churchill
  44. Greg Clark
  45. Colin Clark
  46. Simon Clarke
  47. James Cleverly
  48. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  49. Thérèse Coffey
  50. Damian Collins
  51. Alberto Costa
  52. Robert Courts
  53. Geoffrey Cox
  54. Stephen Crabb
  55. Tracey Crouch
  56. Chris Davies
  57. David Davies
  58. Glyn Davies
  59. Mims Davies
  60. Philip Davies
  61. David Davis
  62. Caroline Dinenage
  63. Leo Docherty
  64. Michelle Donelan
  65. Nadine Dorries
  66. Steve Double
  67. Oliver Dowden
  68. Jackie Doyle-Price
  69. Richard Drax
  70. James Duddridge
  71. David Duguid
  72. Alan Duncan
  73. Iain Duncan Smith
  74. Philip Dunne
  75. Michael Ellis
  76. Tobias Ellwood
  77. Charlie Elphicke
  78. George Eustice
  79. Nigel Evans
  80. David Evennett
  81. Michael Fabricant
  82. Michael Fallon
  83. Mark Field
  84. Vicky Ford
  85. Kevin Foster
  86. Liam Fox
  87. Mark Francois
  88. Lucy Frazer
  89. Mike Freer
  90. Marcus Fysh
  91. Roger Gale
  92. Mark Garnier
  93. David Gauke
  94. Nusrat Ghani
  95. Nick Gibb
  96. Cheryl Gillan
  97. John Glen
  98. Zac Goldsmith
  99. Robert Goodwill
  100. Michael Gove
  101. Luke Graham
  102. Richard Graham
  103. Bill Grant
  104. Helen Grant
  105. James Gray
  106. Chris Grayling
  107. Chris Green
  108. Damian Green
  109. Andrew Griffiths
  110. Kirstene Hair
  111. Robert Halfon
  112. Luke Hall
  113. Philip Hammond
  114. Stephen Hammond
  115. Matt Hancock
  116. Greg Hands
  117. Mark Harper
  118. Rebecca Harris
  119. Trudy Harrison
  120. Simon Hart
  121. John Hayes
  122. Oliver Heald
  123. James Heappey
  124. Chris Heaton-Harris
  125. Peter Heaton-Jones
  126. Gordon Henderson
  127. Nick Herbert
  128. Damian Hinds
  129. Simon Hoare
  130. George Hollingbery
  131. Kevin Hollinrake
  132. Philip Hollobone
  133. Adam Holloway
  134. John Howell
  135. Nigel Huddleston
  136. Eddie Hughes
  137. Jeremy Hunt
  138. Nick Hurd
  139. Alister Jack
  140. Margot James
  141. Sajid Javid
  142. Ranil Jayawardena
  143. Bernard Jenkin
  144. Andrea Jenkyns
  145. Robert Jenrick
  146. Boris Johnson
  147. Caroline Johnson
  148. Gareth Johnson
  149. Andrew Jones
  150. David Jones
  151. Marcus Jones
  152. Daniel Kawczynski
  153. Gillian Keegan
  154. Seema Kennedy
  155. Stephen Kerr
  156. Sir Greg Knight
  157. Julian Knight
  158. Kwasi Kwarteng
  159. John Lamont
  160. Mark Lancaster
  161. Pauline Latham
  162. Andrea Leadsom
  163. Edward Leigh
  164. Andrew Lewer
  165. Brandon Lewis
  166. Julian Lewis
  167. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  168. David Lidington
  169. Julia Lopez
  170. Jack Lopresti
  171. Jonathan Lord
  172. Tim Loughton
  173. Craig Mackinlay
  174. Rachel Maclean
  175. Anne Main
  176. Alan Mak
  177. Kit Malthouse
  178. Scott Mann
  179. Paul Masterson
  180. Theresa May
  181. Paul Maynard
  182. Patrick McLoughlin
  183. Stephen McPartland
  184. Esther McVey
  185. Mark Menzies
  186. Johnny Mercer
  187. Huw Merriman
  188. Stephen Metcalfe
  189. Maria Miller
  190. Amanda Milling
  191. Nigel Mills
  192. Anne Milton
  193. Damien Moore
  194. Penny Mordaunt
  195. Anne Marie Morris
  196. David Morris
  197. James Morris
  198. Wendy Morton (Teller)
  199. David Mundell
  200. Sheryll Murray
  201. Andrew Murrison
  202. Bob Neill
  203. Sarah Newton
  204. Caroline Nokes
  205. Jesse Norman
  206. Neil O’Brien
  207. Matthew Offord
  208. Guy Opperman
  209. Neil Parish
  210. Priti Patel
  211. Owen Paterson
  212. Mark Pawsey
  213. Mike Penning
  214. John Penrose
  215. Andrew Percy
  216. Claire Perry
  217. Chris Philp
  218. Christopher Pincher
  219. Daniel Poulter
  220. Rebecca Pow
  221. Victoria Prentis
  222. Mark Prisk
  223. Mark Pritchard
  224. Tom Pursglove
  225. Jeremy Quin
  226. Will Quince
  227. Dominic Raab
  228. John Redwood
  229. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  230. Laurence Robertson
  231. Mary Robinson
  232. Andrew Rosindell
  233. Douglas Ross
  234. Lee Rowley
  235. Amber Rudd
  236. David Rutley
  237. Paul Scully
  238. Bob Seely
  239. Andrew Selous
  240. Grant Shapps
  241. Alok Sharma
  242. Alec Shelbrooke
  243. Keith Simpson
  244. Chris Skidmore
  245. Chloe Smith
  246. Henry Smith
  247. Julian Smith
  248. Royston Smith
  249. Nicholas Soames
  250. Mark Spencer
  251. Andrew Stephenson
  252. John Stevenson
  253. Bob Stewart
  254. Iain Stewart
  255. Rory Stewart
  256. Gary Streeter
  257. Mel Stride
  258. Graham Stuart
  259. Julian Sturdy
  260. Rishi Sunak
  261. Desmond Swayne
  262. Hugo Swire
  263. Robert Syms
  264. Ross Thomson
  265. Maggie Throup
  266. Kelly Tolhurst
  267. Justin Tomlinson
  268. Michael Tomlinson
  269. Craig Tracey
  270. David Tredinnick
  271. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  272. Elizabeth Truss
  273. Thomas Tugendhat
  274. Shailesh Vara
  275. Martin Vickers
  276. Theresa Villiers
  277. Charles Walker
  278. Robin Walker
  279. Ben Wallace
  280. David Warburton
  281. Matt Warman
  282. Giles Watling
  283. Helen Whately
  284. Heather Wheeler
  285. Craig Whittaker (Teller)
  286. John Whittingdale
  287. Bill Wiggin
  288. Gavin Williamson
  289. Mike Wood
  290. William Wragg
  291. Jeremy Wright
  292. Nadhim Zahawi

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Frank Field
  3. Kelvin Hopkins

Labour

  1. Kevin Barron
  2. Ronnie Campbell
  3. Rosie Cooper
  4. Caroline Flint
  5. Stephen Hepburn
  6. Kate Hoey
  7. John Mann
  8. Dennis Skinner
  9. Graham Stringer

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/Mark Duffy

The post Yvette Cooper’s Bill to demand an Article 50 extension passed by a majority of 1 – how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Results of the Brexit indicative votes II: Every option rejected once again

Following last Wednesday’s first session of indicative votes, MPs have spent a second day debating a variety of proposals relating to Brexit, at the end of which indicative votes again took place using paper ballots which gave us the following results: C) Customs union (Ken Clarke) AYES: 273   NOES: 276 D) “Common market 2.0” (Nick […]

The post Results of the Brexit indicative votes II: Every option rejected once again appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Following last Wednesday’s first session of indicative votes, MPs have spent a second day debating a variety of proposals relating to Brexit, at the end of which indicative votes again took place using paper ballots which gave us the following results:

C) Customs union (Ken Clarke)
AYES: 273   NOES: 276

D) “Common market 2.0” (Nick Boles)
AYES: 261   NOES: 282

E) Second Referendum (Peter Kyle)
AYES: 280   NOES: 292

G) Parliamentary supremacy (Joanna Cherry)
AYES: 191   NOES: 292

As last week, Tory MPs had a free vote, except for Cabinet ministers, who were whipped to abstain. There were four other motions tabled which the Speaker didn’t select to be voted upon, including two from Tory Brexiteer John Baron, on seeking the right to leave the backstop unilaterally and backing No Deal.

As last week, MPs rejected every single option put to a vote.

A breakdown of how MPs voted in each division appears below.

C) Customs union
AYES: 273   NOES: 276  Majority: 3

Proposed by veteran Tory europhile Ken Clarke with support from some Labour backbenchers and a few Tory Remainers, this demands that any Brexit deal should include, as a minimum, a commitment to negotiate a “permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU”. It had been rejected last week by 272 votes to 264.

Voting in favour: 37 Conservatives, 230 Labour MPs, 1 Liberal Democrat and 5 Independents 

Voting against: 236 Conservatives, 10 Labour MPs, 5 Liberal Democrats, all 11 TIG MPs, all 10 DUP MPs, the 1 Green MP and 3 Independents  

Details of who voted which way here.

D) “Common market 2.0”=====================
AYES: 261   NOES: 282  Majority: 21

Proposed by a cross-party group led by Conservative Nick Boles and Labour’s Stephen Kinnock with support from the SNP’s Stewart Hosie, this proposes UK membership of the European Free Trade Association and European Economic Area, allowing continued participation in the Single Market and a “comprehensive customs arrangement” (including a UK say on future EU trade deals) with the EU after Brexit, which would remain in place until the agreement of a wider trade deal which guarantees frictionless movement of goods and an open border in Ireland. It had been rejected last week by 283 votes to 188.

Voting in favour: 33 Conservatives, 185 Labour MPs, 32 SNP MPs, 4 Plaid Cymru MPs, 2 Liberal Democrats and 5 Independents 

Voting against: 228 Conservatives, 25 Labour MPs, 4 Liberal Democrats, all 11 TIG MPs, all 10 DUP MPs, the 1 Green MP and 3 Independents  

Details of who voted which way here.

E) Confirmatory public vote (a.k.a. second referendum)
AYES: 280   NOES: 292  Majority: 12

Proposed by Labour MPs Peter Kyle and Phil Wilson with support from numerous Labour backbenchers, some Tory Remainers, the Lib Dems, Independent Group, SNP and Plaid Cymru, this requires a public vote to confirm any Brexit deal passed by Parliament before its ratification. It had been rejected last week by 295 votes to 268.

Voting in favour: 15 Conservatives, 203 Labour MPs, 31 SNP MPs, 4 Plaid Cymru MPs, all 11 Liberal Democrats, all 11 TIG MPs, the 1 Green MP and 4 Independents 

Voting against: 253 Conservatives, 24 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 5 Independents 

Details of who voted which way here.

G) Parliamentary supremacy=====================
AYES: 191   NOES: 292  Majority 101

Proposed by the SNP’s Joanna Cherry along with Dominic Grieve with support from numerous Labour backbenchers, the Lib Dems, Independent Group and Plaid Cymru, they plan to seek an extension to the Brexit process, and if this is not possible then Parliament would have to choose between either No Deal or revoking Article 50, followed by an inquiry to assess the future relationship likely to be acceptable to Brussels and have majority support in the UK.

Voting in favour: 10 Conservatives, 121 Labour MPs, 32 SNP MPs, 4 Plaid Cymru MPs, 10 Liberal Democrats, all 11 TIG MPs, the 1 Green MP and 2 Independents 

Voting against: 260 Conservatives, 18 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 4 Independents 

Details of who voted which way here.

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/Mark Duffy

The post Results of the Brexit indicative votes II: Every option rejected once again appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Withdrawal Agreement rejected by a majority of 58 – here’s how every MP voted

In January the Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration were rejected by a majority of 230 in the House of Commons. Then, earlier in March, they were rejected again by a majority of 149.  Today, the House of Commons was presented with a motion to endorse the Withdrawal Agreement along with the Joint Instrument and Unilateral […]

The post Withdrawal Agreement rejected by a majority of 58 – here’s how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

In January the Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration were rejected by a majority of 230 in the House of Commons. Then, earlier in March, they were rejected again by a majority of 149

Today, the House of Commons was presented with a motion to endorse the Withdrawal Agreement along with the Joint Instrument and Unilateral Declaration laid before the House in respect of Northern Ireland (but not the Political Declaration) and it was defeated by 344 votes to 286 – a majority of 58.

286 MPs voted for the deal (288 if you include the two tellers), including 279 Conservatives, 5 Labour MPs and 4 Independents. 41 of those Conservatives had opposed the deal earlier in the month, as had 2 of the Labour MPs backing it now (identified below).

Meanwhile, 344 MPs voted against the deal (346 including two tellers), including 34 Conservative rebels, 236 Labour MPs, 34 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs and all 10 DUP MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the 1 Green Party MP and 5 Independents.

4 MPs eligible to vote did not participate in the division: 2 Labour MPs, 1 Independent and 1 SNP MP. 

Below are full lists of which MPs voted against the Agreement, those who did not vote at all (although NB it is impossible to know whether they deliberately abstained, were away from Westminster on parliamentary business elsewhere or were ill etc.) and of course the full list of those who voted for the Agreement.

THE 346 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE AGREEMENT=====

Conservative

  1. Adam Afriyie
  2. Steve Baker
  3. John Baron
  4. Guto Bebb
  5. Peter Bone
  6. Suella Braverman
  7. Andrew Bridgen
  8. William Cash
  9. Christopher Chope
  10. James Duddridge
  11. Mark Francois
  12. Marcus Fysh
  13. Justine Greening
  14. Dominic Grieve
  15. Sam Gyimah
  16. Philip Hollobone
  17. Adam Holloway
  18. Ranil Jayawardena
  19. Bernard Jenkin
  20. Andrea Jenkyns
  21. Jo Johnson
  22. David Jones
  23. Phillip Lee
  24. Julian Lewis
  25. Julia Lopez
  26. Craig Mackinlay
  27. Anne Marie Morris
  28. Priti Patel
  29. Owen Paterson
  30. John Redwood
  31. Laurence Robertson
  32. Andrew Rosindell
  33. Lee Rowley
  34. Theresa Villiers

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Ivan Lewis
  2. Jared O’Mara
  3. Fiona Onasanya
  4. Chris Williamson
  5. John Woodcock

Independent Group

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Ann Coffey
  4. Mike Gapes
  5. Chris Leslie
  6. Joan Ryan
  7. Gavin Shuker
  8. Angela Smith
  9. Anna Soubry
  10. Chuka Umunna
  11. Sarah Wollaston

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nick Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Alan Campbell
  27. Dan Carden
  28. Sarah Champion
  29. Jenny Chapman
  30. Bambos Charalambous
  31. Ann Clwyd
  32. Vernon Coaker
  33. Julie Cooper
  34. Yvette Cooper
  35. Jeremy Corbyn
  36. Neil Coyle
  37. David Crausby
  38. Mary Creagh
  39. Stella Creasy
  40. Jon Cruddas
  41. John Cryer
  42. Judith Cummings
  43. Alex Cunningham
  44. Jim Cunningham
  45. Janet Daby
  46. Nic Dakin
  47. Wayne David
  48. Geraint Davies
  49. Marsha De Cordova
  50. Gloria de Piero
  51. Thangam Debbonaire
  52. Emma Dent Coad
  53. Tan Dhesi
  54. Annaliese Dodds
  55. Stephen Doughty
  56. Peter Dowd
  57. David Drew
  58. Jack Dromey
  59. Rosie Duffield
  60. Angela Eagle
  61. Maria Eagle
  62. Clive Efford
  63. Julie Elliott
  64. Louise Ellman
  65. Chris Elmore
  66. Bill Esterson
  67. Christopher Evans
  68. Paul Farrelly
  69. Colleen Fletcher
  70. Yvonne Fovargue
  71. Vicky Foxcroft
  72. James Frith
  73. Gill Furniss
  74. Hugh Gaffney
  75. Barry Gardiner
  76. Ruth George
  77. Preet Gill
  78. Mary Glindon
  79. Roger Godsiff
  80. Helen Goodman
  81. Kate Green
  82. Lilian Greenwood
  83. Margaret Greenwood
  84. Nia Griffith
  85. John Grogan
  86. Andrew Gwynne
  87. Louise Haigh
  88. Fabian Hamilton
  89. David Hanson
  90. Emma Hardy
  91. Harriet Harman
  92. Carolyn Harris
  93. Helen Hayes
  94. Sue Hayman
  95. John Healey
  96. Mark Hendrick
  97. Stephen Hepburn
  98. Mike Hill
  99. Meg Hillier
  100. Margaret Hodge
  101. Sharon Hodgson
  102. Kate Hoey
  103. Kate Hollern
  104. George Howarth
  105. Rupa Huq
  106. Imran Hussain
  107. Dan Jarvis
  108. Diana Johnson
  109. Darren Jones
  110. Gerald Jones
  111. Graham Jones
  112. Helen Jones
  113. Kevan Jones
  114. Sarah Jones
  115. Susan Elan Jones
  116. Michael Kane
  117. Barbara Keeley
  118. Elizabeth Kendall
  119. Afzal Khan
  120. Gerard Killen
  121. Stephen Kinnock
  122. Peter Kyle
  123. Lesley Laird
  124. David Lammy
  125. Ian Lavery
  126. Karen Lee
  127. Emma Lewell-Buck
  128. Clive Lewis
  129. Tony Lloyd
  130. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  131. Ian Lucas
  132. Holly Lynch
  133. Justin Madders
  134. Khalid Mahmood
  135. Shabana Mahmood
  136. Seema Malhotra
  137. Gordon Marsden
  138. Sandy Martin
  139. Rachael Maskell
  140. Chris Matheson
  141. Steve McCabe
  142. Kerry McCarthy
  143. Siobhain McDonagh
  144. Andy McDonald
  145. John McDonnell
  146. Pat McFadden
  147. Conor McGinn
  148. Alison McGovern
  149. Liz McInnes
  150. Catherine McKinnell
  151. Jim McMahon
  152. Anna McMorrin
  153. Ian Mearns
  154. Ed Miliband
  155. Madeleine Moon
  156. Jessica Morden
  157. Stephen Morgan
  158. Grahame Morris
  159. Ian Murray
  160. Lisa Nandy
  161. Alex Norris
  162. Melanie Onn
  163. Chi Onwurah
  164. Kate Osamor
  165. Albert Owen
  166. Stephanie Peacock
  167. Teresa Pearce
  168. Matthew Pennycook
  169. Toby Perkins
  170. Jess Phillips
  171. Bridget Phillipson
  172. Laura Pidcock
  173. Jo Platt
  174. Luke Pollard
  175. Stephen Pound
  176. Lucy Powell
  177. Yasmin Qureshi
  178. Faisal Rashid
  179. Angela Rayner
  180. Steve Reed
  181. Christina Rees
  182. Ellie Reeves
  183. Rachel Reeves
  184. Emma Reynolds
  185. Jonathan Reynolds
  186. Marie Rimmer
  187. Geoffrey Robinson
  188. Matt Rodda
  189. Danielle Rowley
  190. Chris Ruane
  191. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  192. Naz Shah
  193. Virendra Sharma
  194. Barry Sheerman
  195. Paula Sherriff
  196. Tulip Siddiq
  197. Andy Slaughter
  198. Ruth Smeeth
  199. Cat Smith
  200. Eleanor Smith
  201. Jeff Smith
  202. Laura Smith
  203. Nick Smith
  204. Owen Smith
  205. Karin Smyth
  206. Gareth Snell
  207. Alex Sobel
  208. John Spellar
  209. Keir Starmer
  210. Jo Stevens
  211. Wes Streeting
  212. Graham Stringer
  213. Paul Sweeney
  214. Mark Tami
  215. Gareth Thomas
  216. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  217. Emily Thornberry
  218. Stephen Timms
  219. Jon Trickett
  220. Anna Turley
  221. Karl Turner
  222. Derek Twigg
  223. Stephen Twigg
  224. Liz Twist
  225. Keith Vaz
  226. Valerie Vaz
  227. Thelma Walker
  228. Tom Watson
  229. Catherine West
  230. Matt Western
  231. Alan Whitehead
  232. Martin Whitfield
  233. Paul Williams
  234. Phil Wilson
  235. Mohammad Yasin
  236. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus MacNeil
  25. Stewart McDonald
  26. Stuart McDonald
  27. Carol Monaghan
  28. Gavin Newlands
  29. Brendan O’Hara
  30. Tommy Sheppard
  31. Chris Stephens
  32. Alison Thewliss
  33. Philippa Whitford
  34. Pete Wishart

4 MPs DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*==========

Independent

  1. Kelvin Hopkins (voted against in January and March)

Labour

  1. Ronnie Campbell (voted against in January and March)
  2. Dennis Skinner (voted against in January and March)

SNP

  1. John McNally (voted against in January and March)

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. The Newport West seat is vacant, pending a by-election.

THE 288 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE AGREEMENT==========

Conservative (Ministers/Whips in bold italics, PPSs/Party Vice-Chairs/Deputy Chair in bold)

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Peter Aldous
  4. Lucy Allan (voted against in January and March)
  5. David Amess (voted against in January)
  6. Stuart Andrew
  7. Edward Argar
  8. Victoria Atkins
  9. Richard Bacon (voted against in January and March)
  10. Kemi Badenoch
  11. Harriett Baldwin
  12. Steve Barclay
  13. Henry Bellingham
  14. Richard Benyon
  15. Paul Beresford
  16. Jake Berry
  17. Bob Blackman (voted against in January)
  18. Crispin Blunt (voted against in January and March)
  19. Nick Boles
  20. Peter Bottomley
  21. Andrew Bowie
  22. Ben Bradley (voted against in January)
  23. Karen Bradley
  24. Graham Brady (voted against in January)
  25. Jack Brereton
  26. Steve Brine
  27. James Brokenshire
  28. Fiona Bruce (voted against in January)
  29. Robert Buckland
  30. Alex Burghart
  31. Conor Burns (voted against in January and March)
  32. Alistair Burt
  33. Alun Cairns
  34. James Cartlidge
  35. Maria Caulfield (voted against in January)
  36. Alex Chalk
  37. Rehman Chishti (voted against in January and March)
  38. Jo Churchill
  39. Colin Clark
  40. Greg Clark
  41. Kenneth Clarke
  42. Simon Clarke (voted against in January and March)
  43. James Cleverly
  44. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  45. Thérèse Coffey
  46. Damian Collins (voted against in January and March)
  47. Alberto Costa
  48. Robert Courts (voted against in January and March)
  49. Geoffrey Cox
  50. Stephen Crabb
  51. Tracey Crouch (voted against in January)
  52. Chris Davies
  53. David Davies
  54. Glyn Davies
  55. Mims Davies
  56. Philip Davies (voted against in January)
  57. David Davis (voted against in January)
  58. Caroline Dinenage
  59. Jonathan Djanogly
  60. Leo Docherty
  61. Michelle Donelan
  62. Nadine Dorries (voted against in January)
  63. Steve Double (voted against in January)
  64. Oliver Dowden
  65. Jackie Doyle-Price
  66. Richard Drax (voted against in January and March)
  67. David Duguid
  68. Alan Duncan
  69. Iain Duncan Smith (voted against in January and March)
  70. Philip Dunne
  71. Michael Ellis
  72. Tobias Ellwood
  73. Charlie Elphicke (voted against in January and March)
  74. George Eustice
  75. Nigel Evans (voted against in January)
  76. David Evennett (voted against in January)
  77. Michael Fabricant (voted against in January and March)
  78. Michael Fallon (voted against in January and March)
  79. Mark Field
  80. Vicky Ford
  81. Kevin Foster
  82. Liam Fox
  83. Lucy Frazer
  84. George Freeman
  85. Mike Freer
  86. Roger Gale
  87. Mark Garnier
  88. David Gauke
  89. Nusrat Ghani
  90. Nick Gibb
  91. Cheryl Gillan
  92. John Glen
  93. Zac Goldsmith (voted against in January)
  94. Robert Goodwill
  95. Michael Gove
  96. Luke Graham
  97. Richard Graham
  98. Bill Grant
  99. Helen Grant
  100. James Gray (voted against in January and March)
  101. Chris Grayling
  102. Chris Green (voted against in January and March)
  103. Damian Green
  104. Andrew Griffiths
  105. Kirstene Hair
  106. Robert Halfon (voted against in January)
  107. Luke Hall
  108. Philip Hammond
  109. Stephen Hammond
  110. Matt Hancock
  111. Greg Hands (voted against in January)
  112. Mark Harper (voted against in January and March)
  113. Richard Harrington
  114. Rebecca Harris
  115. Trudy Harrison
  116. Simon Hart
  117. John Hayes (voted against in January)
  118. Oliver Heald
  119. James Heappey
  120. Chris Heaton-Harris
  121. Peter Heaton-Jones
  122. Gordon Henderson (voted against in January and March)
  123. Nick Herbert
  124. Damian Hinds
  125. Simon Hoare
  126. George Hollingbery
  127. Kevin Hollinrake
  128. John Howell
  129. Eddie Hughes (voted against in January and March)
  130. Nigel Huddleston
  131. Jeremy Hunt
  132. Nick Hurd
  133. Alister Jack
  134. Margot James
  135. Sajid Javid
  136. Robert Jenrick
  137. Boris Johnson (voted against in January and March)
  138. Caroline Johnson
  139. Gareth Johnson (voted against in January and March)
  140. Andrew Jones
  141. Marcus Jones
  142. Daniel Kawczynski (voted against in January and March)
  143. Gillian Keegan
  144. Seema Kennedy
  145. Stephen Kerr
  146. Greg Knight (voted against in January)
  147. Julian Knight
  148. Kwasi Kwarteng
  149. John Lamont (voted against in January)
  150. Mark Lancaster
  151. Pauline Latham (voted against in January and March)
  152. Andrea Leadsom
  153. Jeremy Lefroy
  154. Edward Leigh
  155. Oliver Letwin
  156. Andrew Lewer (voted against in January and March)
  157. Brandon Lewis
  158. Ian Liddell-Grainger (voted against in January and March)
  159. David Lidington
  160. Jack Lopresti
  161. Jonathan Lord (voted against in January and March)
  162. Tim Loughton (voted against in January)
  163. Rachel Maclean
  164. Anne Main (voted against in January and March)
  165. Alan Mak
  166. Kit Malthouse
  167. Scott Mann (voted against in January)
  168. Paul Masterton
  169. Theresa May
  170. Paul Maynard
  171. Patrick McLoughlin
  172. Stephen McPartland (voted against in January)
  173. Esther McVey (voted against in January and March)
  174. Mark Menzies
  175. Johnny Mercer (voted against in January)
  176. Huw Merriman
  177. Stephen Metcalfe (voted against in January)
  178. Maria Miller
  179. Amanda Milling
  180. Nigel Mills (voted against in January)
  181. Anne Milton
  182. Andrew Mitchell (voted against in January)
  183. Damien Moore (voted against in January)
  184. Penny Mordaunt
  185. Nicky Morgan
  186. David Morris
  187. James Morris
  188. Wendy Morton
  189. David Mundell
  190. Sheryll Murray (voted against in January and March)
  191. Andrew Murrison
  192. Bob Neill
  193. Sarah Newton
  194. Caroline Nokes
  195. Jesse Norman
  196. Neil O’Brien
  197. Matthew Offord (voted against in January)
  198. Guy Opperman
  199. Neil Parish
  200. Mark Pawsey
  201. Mike Penning (voted against in January)
  202. John Penrose
  203. Andrew Percy
  204. Claire Perry
  205. Chris Philp
  206. Christopher Pincher
  207. Daniel Poulter
  208. Rebecca Pow
  209. Victoria Prentis
  210. Mark Prisk
  211. Mark Pritchard (voted against in January)
  212. Tom Pursglove (voted against in January and March)
  213. Jeremy Quin
  214. Will Quince (voted against in January)
  215. Dominic Raab (voted against in January and March)
  216. Jacob Rees-Mogg (voted against in January and March)
  217. Mary Robinson
  218. Douglas Ross (voted against in January; was at his child’s birth in March)
  219. Amber Rudd
  220. David Rutley
  221. Antoinette Sandbach
  222. Paul Scully
  223. Bob Seely
  224. Andrew Selous
  225. Grant Shapps (voted against in January and March)
  226. Alok Sharma
  227. Alec Shelbrooke
  228. Keith Simpson
  229. Chris Skidmore
  230. Chloe Smith
  231. Henry Smith (voted against in January and March)
  232. Julian Smith
  233. Royston Smith (voted against in January and March)
  234. Nicholas Soames
  235. Caroline Spelman
  236. Mark Spencer
  237. Andrew Stephenson
  238. John Stevenson
  239. Bob Stewart (voted against in January and March)
  240. Iain Stewart
  241. Rory Stewart
  242. Gary Streeter
  243. Mel Stride
  244. Graham Stuart
  245. Julian Sturdy (voted against in January)
  246. Rishi Sunak
  247. Desmond Swayne
  248. Hugo Swire (voted against in January)
  249. Robert Syms (voted against in January)
  250. Derek Thomas (voted against in January)
  251. Ross Thomson (voted against in January and March)
  252. Maggie Throup
  253. Kelly Tolhurst
  254. Justin Tomlinson
  255. Michael Tomlinson (voted against in January and March)
  256. Craig Tracey (voted against in January and March)
  257. David Tredinnick
  258. Anne-Marie Trevelyan (voted against in January and March)
  259. Elizabeth Truss
  260. Thomas Tugendhat
  261. Edward Vaizey
  262. Shailesh Vara (voted against in January and March)
  263. Martin Vickers (voted against in January)
  264. Charles Walker
  265. Robin Walker
  266. Ben Wallace
  267. David Warburton
  268. Matt Warman
  269. Giles Watling (voted against in January)
  270. Helen Whately
  271. Heather Wheeler
  272. Craig Whittaker
  273. John Whittingdale (voted against in January and March)
  274. Bill Wiggin (voted against in January)
  275. Gavin Williamson
  276. Mike Wood
  277. William Wragg (voted against in January)
  278. Jeremy Wright
  279. Nadhim Zahawi

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Frank Field
  3. Sylvia Hermon
  4. Stephen Lloyd

Labour

  1. Kevin Barron
  2. Rosie Cooper (voted against in January and March)
  3. Jim Fitzpatrick (voted against in January and March)
  4. Caroline Flint (voted against in January)
  5. John Mann

The post Withdrawal Agreement rejected by a majority of 58 – here’s how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Why I’ve reluctantly concluded that MPs need to vote for Theresa May’s deal

As I mulled over writing what you are about to read while walking past the pro-Brexit demonstrators outside Parliament yesterday, I don’t mind admitting that my eyes welled up and I was overcome with emotion. I thought about the strength of feeling among those demonstrators – and indeed amongst the tens of thousands of loyal […]

The post Why I’ve reluctantly concluded that MPs need to vote for Theresa May’s deal appeared first on BrexitCentral.

As I mulled over writing what you are about to read while walking past the pro-Brexit demonstrators outside Parliament yesterday, I don’t mind admitting that my eyes welled up and I was overcome with emotion.

I thought about the strength of feeling among those demonstrators – and indeed amongst the tens of thousands of loyal BrexitCentral readers – about the need to deliver on the historic referendum result of 2016 where our fellow countrymen voted in unprecedented numbers for that proposition which defied the will of the political establishment; and I thought about how some of them may feel let down.

That’s because I have, with the heaviest of hearts, come to the conclusion that Parliament should pass the deal which Theresa May is putting to the House of Commons again later today. Please hear me out as I explain why.

There can be few who have been more invested in the whole process of getting Brexit delivered than me, having been chronicling the process on a daily basis since September 2016, firing up my laptop before the crack of dawn most days and then staying up later than is healthy to read the first editions of the following day’s papers in order to provide the comprehensive service that I know is appreciated by so many. And from the start, BrexitCentral has been unapologetically in favour of promoting the delivery of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU with an optimistic attitude about our future as an independent nation.

As the details of the likely shape of the Brexit deal emerged with the Chequers proposals last summer, we published numerous articles critical of the approach being taken by the Government. And ever since the Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration emerged last November, barely a day has gone by when BrexitCentral has not carried pieces exposing the shortcomings and failings of the deal for a whole variety of reasons.

I understand the strength of hostility to the deal. I share the feeling. It is a bad deal. I vividly remember welcoming Theresa May’s statement at Lancaster House that “no deal for Britain is better than a bad deal for Britain”. So after she presented the country with a bad deal, I concluded that leaving the EU on WTO terms with numerous mini-deals on the side – because that’s what ‘No Deal’ would actually entail – was the optimal outcome. Judging from my daily inbox, I know that huge numbers of BrexitCentral readers agree.

And, of course, leaving without a deal is the default position in law, as I have said in many an interview on TV and radio over the last few months.

However, as someone who has nerdily followed politics and Parliament for the best part of three decades, I thought there were also a number of other things that were taken to be default positions and incontrovertible rules of our parliamentary system. Such as neutral motions in the House of Commons not being able to be subject to amendment. Or the Government being in charge of the parliamentary timetable. Or ministers being expected to resign if they are not willing to vote with the Government. Or the Speaker of the House of Commons observing and protecting long-standing rules of procedure. Yet I’m afraid the events of recent days and weeks have seen all these norms – and more – discarded and abandoned.

The default position might be to leave on WTO terms if the deal is not agreed, but the House of Commons has shown itself to be fervently against allowing a no-deal scenario: in Wednesday’s indicative votes, only 160 MPs were willing to say they would back No Deal while no fewer than 400 voted against it – a majority of 240. And twice now Speaker John Bercow has allowed MPs on a mission to scupper the Brexit for which I yearn to vote to seize control of the House of Commons’ agenda. And that’s just the beginning of their antics.

I have concluded that those same MPs would therefore have it within their power to use every trick in the book – and most probably tricks that aren’t even codified in books – to prevent a no-deal Brexit over the coming fortnight if the deal is not passed. In extremis they might be able to contrive to act in a way that resulted in the revocation of Article 50. At the very least, they would likely cause the imposition of a long extension to Article 50, during which their parliamentary shenanigans would continue and by the end of which the mandate of our 2016 referendum would doubtless be called into question.

We are into serious uncharted territory with precedents being ripped up here, there and everywhere. So failing to back the bad deal on the table gravely risks the prospect of any form of Brexit being delivered at all.

There is one particular saving grace of backing the deal and formally leaving the EU, as former Cabinet minister Lord Lilley sets out in today’s Sun newspaper:

“Once outside the EU, there will be a ratchet preventing our return – because that would involve accepting the euro, Schengen, free movement and an annual contribution without Mrs Thatcher’s rebate. Moreover, the very humiliation of our Vassal status – being subject to EU laws, tariffs and trading policies without any say – will amplify pressures to extricate ourselves from this status.”

He concludes that “in this fallen world we often have to make choices between two evils” and that “this appalling Withdrawal Agreement is the lesser evil”. I believe he is correct.

I’m not giving the deal an enthusiastic endorsement. Far from it. I am merely saying that MPs should, with the greatest of reluctance, vote for it on the basis that the realistic alternatives are even more unpalatable.

I know some people – including passionate campaigners who have written for and supported BrexitCentral – will be disappointed by my conclusion. I hope that we can disagree respectfully; and they should know that they will continue to have access to the BrexitCentral platform to put their case as I have always sought to make this website a place for the range of opinions from within the Brexit-backing family to be heard (and today, for example, Alasdair Dow makes the case for rejecting the deal on the basis of the Irish backstop here).

This has been one of the hardest things I have ever had to write. I have agonised over the issue these last few days, ever since the Government lost control of the parliamentary agenda. I dare say some will believe me to be deserting the cause of a clean break Brexit. But I’m afraid the simple truth is that political reality and parliamentary arithmetic dictate that such an option is not now available to us.

The post Why I’ve reluctantly concluded that MPs need to vote for Theresa May’s deal appeared first on BrexitCentral.