The questions with which Tory Brexiteers are grappling right now

It’s the beginning of another critical week that will likely define whether Brexit happens at the end of next week (as it currently should, on the basis of the law of the land) or if there will be a delay for some as yet unspecified reason and for an as yet unknown period. I know […]

The post The questions with which Tory Brexiteers are grappling right now appeared first on BrexitCentral.

It’s the beginning of another critical week that will likely define whether Brexit happens at the end of next week (as it currently should, on the basis of the law of the land) or if there will be a delay for some as yet unspecified reason and for an as yet unknown period.

I know many of those Conservative MPs who opposed the Theresa May’s deal last week have spent the weekend agonising how to vote if and when it is brought back to the Commons, subject to pressure from a variety of sources giving them distinctly different advice.

On the one hand, they are told by some that blocking a deal that would see the UK formally leaving the EU in a matter of weeks would provoke a backlash from voters who want Brexit delivered. Moreover, they are told that they risk no Brexit at all since it would likely lead to a long extension to the Article 50 period during which anything could happen. Indeed, they are reminded that campaigning most vociferously for the deal to be voted down right now are the so-called People’s Vote campaign, sensing it as their best opportunity to reverse Brexit altogether.

On the other hand, they are advised by others that if they back the deal, there will be a public backlash some months down the line once it becomes clear to voters the constraints which it places on the British Government over the coming years. In other words, that what was a bad deal last week remains a bad deal this week. Martin Howe QC puts this case on BrexitCentral this morning.

Much hinges on whether the Government would put to Parliament in a week’s time an Article 50 extension under whatever terms might be offered by the European Council at the end of this week – and whether it would be passed.

Theresa May promised the Commons last Tuesday:

“If the House votes for an extension [which it did in principle on Thursday], the Government will seek to agree that extension with the EU and bring forward the necessary legislation to change the exit date, commensurate with that extension.”

Those inside the Government lament that despite Thursday’s motion not technically being legally binding, this promise at the Despatch Box effectively gives the Prime Minister no choice but to proceed with such an extension. But what if the terms offered are so punitive or outrageous as to clearly be against the UK’s interests – not to mention in breach of oft-repeated manifesto commitments? Is it conceivable that she would stand up to Brussels and refuse to go ahead on those terms? But then even if the Government relented, would the Remain-dominated Commons not find a way of forcing the Government’s hand in some way?

That said, any legislative move to extend Article 50 would be taking place just a few days before the legal exit day. Would there be sufficient time to get it through Parliament? And if the terms of any extension were indeed punitive or unreasonable, could the Commons yet vote against it, prompting the default of an exit on WTO terms on 29th March?

So many questions… Yet what is clear to me is that it is the antics of those recalcitrant Remainers inside Parliament – and indeed inside the Government – who openly campaigned against a no-deal Brexit and voted accordingly in the Commons last week which have undermined the UK’s negotiating stance to the point that none of the remaining options which the Government says is left available would be acceptable to the majority in the country who voted for Brexit. All in all, a thoroughly sub-optimal situation.

The post The questions with which Tory Brexiteers are grappling right now appeared first on BrexitCentral.

MPs reject second referendum and back Government motion seeking an Article 50 extension – how all MPs voted

At the end of another day’s debate on Brexit (watch our video highlights here) MPs voted on a series of amendments relating to seeking a possible extension to the Article 50 negotiating period. SECOND REFERENDUM AMENDMENT First up was TIG MP Sarah Wollaston‘s Amendment seeking an Article 50 extension “for the purposes of legislating for and […]

The post MPs reject second referendum and back Government motion seeking an Article 50 extension – how all MPs voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

At the end of another day’s debate on Brexit (watch our video highlights here) MPs voted on a series of amendments relating to seeking a possible extension to the Article 50 negotiating period.

SECOND REFERENDUM AMENDMENT

First up was TIG MP Sarah Wollaston‘s Amendment seeking an Article 50 extension “for the purposes of legislating for and conducting a public vote” on whether to Leave or Remain in the EU – the fabled second referendum.

The amendment was defeated by 334 votes to 85 – a majority of 249.

Of the 334 MPs who opposed the amendment (336 if you include the two tellers), there were 303 Conservatives, 18 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 5 Independents, with Labour MPs whipped to abstain on the vote.

Meanwhile, of the 85 MPs who voted for the amendment (87 including two tellers), there were 25 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru and the sole Green Party MP.

The 18  Labour MPs opposing the extension for a second referendum were: Kevin Barron, Ronnie Campbell, Rosie Cooper, Caroline Flint, Yvonne Fovargue, Kate Hoey, Helen Jones, Kevan Jones, Emma Lewell-Buck, Justin Madders, John Mann, Stephanie Peacock, Lloyd Russell-Moyle (voted in both lobbies), Ruth Smeeth, Gareth Snell, John Spellar, Graham Stringer and Derek Twigg

The 25 Labour MPs supporting the extension for a second referendum were: Tonia Antoniazzi, Ann Clwyd, Neil Coyle, Stella Creasy, Janet Daby, Geraint Davies, Rosie Duffield, Paul Farrelly, John Grogan, Meg Hillier, Ged Killen, David Lammy, Siobhain McDonagh, Anna McMorrin, Ian Murray, Albert Owen, Lloyd Russell-Moyle (voted in both lobbies), Tulip Siddiq, Owen Smith, Alex Sobel, Jo Stevens, Gareth Thomas, Catherine West, Martin Whitfield and Daniel Zeichner

All remaining Labour MPs abstained.

There were 10 Conservative MPs who did not vote in the division (including the small clutch of Tories who purportedly back a second referendum): Guto Bebb, Kenneth Clarke, Richard Drax, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Sam Gyimah, Jo Johnson, Phillip Lee, Antoinette Sandbach and Edward Vaizey

LUCY POWELL’S AMENDMENT

Before MPs voted on Hilary Benn’s amendment, MPs voted on Lucy Powell’s amendment to it to make it cover a period ending on 30th June 2019.

It was defeated by 314 votes to 311 – a majority of 3.

Of the 314 MPs who voted against the amendment (316 if you include the two tellers), there were 296 Conservatives, 6 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 4 Independents.

Meanwhile, of the 311 MPs who voted for the amendment 313 including two tellers), there were 16 Conservatives, 232 Labour MPs, 34 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the sole Green Party MP and 4 Independents.

The 6 Labour MPs opposing the amendment were: Kevin Barron, Ronnie Campbell, Stephen Hepburn, Kate Hoey, John Mann and Graham Stringer

The 16 Conservative MPs supporting the amendment were: Guto Bebb, Richard Benyon, Nick Boles, Kenneth Clarke, Jonathan Djanogly, George Freeman, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Sam Gyimah, Robert Halfon, Phillip Lee, Oliver Letwin, Antoinette Sandbach, Nicholas Soames, John Stevenson and Edward Vaizey

HILARY BENN’S AMENDMENT

Then it was on to Hilary Benn’s amendment itself, which was also co-signed by the likes of Oliver Letwin and Yvette Cooper, which sought to hand over next Wednesday’s Commons business to a debate on a motion on Brexit proposed by at least 25 MPs from at least five parties.

It was defeated by 314 votes to 312 – a majority of 2.

Of the 314 MPs who voted against the amendment (316 if you include the two tellers), there were 296 Conservatives, 6 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 4 Independents.

Meanwhile, of the 312 MPs who voted for the amendment (314 including two tellers), there were 15 Conservatives, 233 Labour MPs, 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the sole Green Party MP and 4 Independents.

The 6 Labour MPs opposing the amendment were: Kevin Barron, Ronnie Campbell, Caroline Flint, Kate Hoey, John Mann and Graham Stringer

The 15 Conservative MPs supporting the amendment were: Guto Bebb, Richard Benyon, Nick Boles, Kenneth Clarke, Jonathan Djanogly, George Freeman, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Sam Gyimah, Phillip Lee, Oliver Letwin, Antoinette Sandbach, Nicholas Soames, John Stevenson and Edward Vaizey

JEREMY CORBYN’S AMENDMENT

Next up was  Labour’s Amendment to instruct the Prime Minister “to seek an Article 50 extension to avoid a no-deal Brexit on 29th March and to provide parliamentary time to find a majority for a different approach

It was defeated by 318 votes to 302 – a majority of 16.

Of the 318 MPs who voted against the amendment (320 if you include the two tellers), there were 306 Conservatives, 1 Labour MP (Kevin Barron), all 10 DUP MPs and 3 Independents.

Meanwhile, of the 302 MPs who voted for the amendment (304 including two tellers), there were 1 Conservative (Ken Clarke), 238 Labour MPs, 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the sole Green Party MP and 3 Independents.

MAIN GOVERNMENT MOTION

Finally, MPs moved to the main Government motion to seek an Article 50 extension of an unspecified length, which read as follows:

1. notes the resolutions of the House of 12 and 13 March, and accordingly agrees the Government will seek to agree with the European Union an extension of the period specified in Article 50(3);

2. agrees that if the House has passed a resolution approving the negotiated withdrawal agreement and the framework for the future relationship for the purposes of section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 by 20 March 2019 then the Government will seek to agree with the European Union a one-off extension of the period specified in Article 50(3) for a period ending on 30 June 2019 for the purpose of passing the necessary EU exit legislation; and

3. notes that if the House has not passed a resolution approving the negotiated withdrawal agreement and the framework for the future relationship for the purposes of section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 by 20 March 2019 then it is highly likely the European Council at its meeting the following day would require a clear purpose for any extension, not least to determine its length, and any extension beyond 30 June 2019 would require the United Kingdom to hold European Parliament elections in May 2019.

The motion was passed by 412 votes to 202 – a majority of 210, with Conservative MPs – including ministers – having a free vote. And notably, only 114 of them backed the extension, with 190 of their number voting against it. 

Of the 202 MPs who voted against an extension amendment (204 if you include the two tellers), there were 190 Conservatives, 3 Labour MPs, all 10 DUP MPs and 1 Independent.

Meanwhile, of the 412 MPs who voted for an extension (414 including two tellers), there were 114 Conservatives, 236 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, 11 Lib Dem MPs and 9 TIG MPs along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the sole Green Party MP and 5 Independents.

Of the remaining eligible 20 MPs who did not cast a vote, they comprised 10 Conservatives, 4 Labour MPs, 4 Independent MPs and 2 TIG MPs. 

Below are full lists of which MPs voted for and against the motion seeking an extension, as well as those who did not vote at all (although NB it is impossible to know whether they deliberately abstained, were away from Westminster on parliamentary business elsewhere or were ill etc).

THE 204 MPs WHO OPPOSED AN EXTENSION===============

 

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Adam Afriyie
  3. Lucy Allan
  4. David Amess
  5. Stuart Andrew
  6. Richard Bacon
  7. Kemi Badenoch
  8. Steve Baker
  9. Harriett Baldwin
  10. Stephen Barclay
  11. John Baron
  12. Henry Bellingham
  13. Jake Berry
  14. Bob Blackman
  15. Crispin Blunt
  16. Peter Bone (Teller)
  17. Ben Bradley
  18. Graham Brady
  19. Suella Braverman
  20. Jack Brereton
  21. Andrew Bridgen
  22. Fiona Bruce
  23. Alex Burghart
  24. Conor Burns
  25. Alun Cairns
  26. William Cash
  27. Maria Caulfield
  28. Rehman Chishti
  29. Christopher Chope
  30. Jo Churchill
  31. Colin Clark
  32. Simon Clarke
  33. James Cleverly
  34. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  35. Damian Collins
  36. Robert Courts
  37. Tracey Crouch
  38. Chris Davies
  39. David T. C. Davies
  40. Glyn Davies
  41. Mims Davies
  42. Philip Davies
  43. Caroline Dinenage
  44. Leo Docherty
  45. Michelle Donelan
  46. Nadine Dorries
  47. Steve Double
  48. Jackie Doyle-Price
  49. James Duddridge
  50. Iain Duncan Smith
  51. Michael Ellis
  52. Charlie Elphicke
  53. George Eustice
  54. Nigel Evans
  55. David Evennett
  56. Michael Fabricant
  57. Michael Fallon
  58. Kevin Foster
  59. Liam Fox
  60. Mark Francois
  61. Marcus Fysh
  62. Nusrat Ghani
  63. John Glen
  64. Zac Goldsmith
  65. Helen Grant
  66. James Gray
  67. Chris Grayling
  68. Chris Green
  69. Andrew Griffiths
  70. Kirstene Hair
  71. Robert Halfon
  72. Luke Hall
  73. Mark Harper
  74. Rebecca Harris
  75. Trudy Harrison
  76. Simon Hart
  77. John Hayes
  78. James Heappey
  79. Chris Heaton-Harris
  80. Philip Hollobone
  81. Adam Holloway
  82. Nigel Huddleston
  83. Eddie Hughes
  84. Ranil Jayawardena
  85. Bernard Jenkin
  86. Andrea Jenkyns
  87. Robert Jenrick
  88. Boris Johnson
  89. Caroline Johnson
  90. Gareth Johnson
  91. David Jones
  92. Marcus Jones
  93. Daniel Kawczynski
  94. Julian Knight
  95. Greg Knight
  96. Kwasi Kwarteng
  97. John Lamont
  98. Pauline Latham
  99. Andrea Leadsom
  100. Edward Leigh
  101. Andrew Lewer
  102. Julian Lewis
  103. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  104. Julia Lopez
  105. Jack Lopresti
  106. Jonathan Lord
  107. Tim Loughton
  108. Craig Mackinlay
  109. Rachel Maclean
  110. Anne Main
  111. Alan Mak
  112. Kit Malthouse
  113. Scott Mann
  114. Paul Maynard
  115. Stephen McPartland
  116. Esther McVey
  117. Mark Menzies
  118. Johnny Mercer
  119. Huw Merriman
  120. Stephen Metcalfe
  121. Amanda Milling
  122. Nigel Mills
  123. Damien Moore
  124. Penny Mordaunt
  125. Anne Marie Morris
  126. David Morris
  127. James Morris
  128. Wendy Morton
  129. Sheryll Murray
  130. Andrew Murrison
  131. Jesse Norman
  132. Neil O’Brien
  133. Matthew Offord
  134. Priti Patel
  135. Owen Paterson
  136. Mike Penning
  137. Andrew Percy
  138. Chris Philp
  139. Christopher Pincher
  140. Mark Pritchard
  141. Tom Pursglove
  142. Will Quince
  143. Dominic Raab
  144. John Redwood
  145. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  146. Laurence Robertson
  147. Mary Robinson
  148. Andrew Rosindell
  149. Douglas Ross
  150. Lee Rowley
  151. Paul Scully
  152. Grant Shapps
  153. Chris Skidmore
  154. Chloe Smith
  155. Henry Smith
  156. Royston Smith
  157. Mark Spencer
  158. Andrew Stephenson
  159. Bob Stewart
  160. Iain Stewart
  161. Graham Stuart
  162. Julian Sturdy
  163. Rishi Sunak
  164. Desmond Swayne
  165. Robert Syms
  166. Derek Thomas
  167. Ross Thomson
  168. Maggie Throup
  169. Kelly Tolhurst
  170. Michael Tomlinson
  171. Craig Tracey
  172. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  173. Elizabeth Truss
  174. Tom Tugendhat
  175. Shailesh Vara
  176. Martin Vickers
  177. Theresa Villiers
  178. Ben Wallace
  179. David Warburton
  180. Matt Warman
  181. Giles Watling
  182. Helen Whately
  183. Heather Wheeler
  184. Craig Whittaker
  185. John Whittingdale
  186. Bill Wiggin
  187. Gavin Williamson
  188. Mike Wood
  189. William Wragg (Teller)
  190. Nadhim Zahawi

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Frank Field

Labour

  1. Stephen Hepburn
  2. Kate Hoey
  3. Graham Stringer

 

THE 414 MPs WHO SUPPORTED AN EXTENSION===========

 

Conservative

  1. Bim Afolami
  2. Peter Aldous
  3. Edward Argar
  4. Victoria Atkins
  5. Richard Benyon
  6. Paul Beresford
  7. Nick Boles
  8. Peter Bottomley
  9. Andrew Bowie
  10. Karen Bradley
  11. Steve Brine
  12. James Brokenshire
  13. Robert Buckland
  14. Alistair Burt
  15. Alun Cairns
  16. James Cartlidge
  17. Alex Chalk
  18. Greg Clark
  19. Kenneth Clarke
  20. Therese Coffey
  21. Alberto Costa
  22. Geoffrey Cox
  23. Stephen Crabb
  24. David Davis
  25. Jonathan Djanogly
  26. Oliver Dowden
  27. David Duguid
  28. Alan Duncan
  29. Philip Dunne
  30. Tobias Ellwood
  31. Mark Field
  32. Vicky Ford
  33. Lucy Frazer
  34. Mike Freer (Teller)
  35. George Freeman
  36. Roger Gale
  37. Mark Garnier
  38. David Gauke
  39. Nick Gibb
  40. Cheryl Gillan
  41. Robert Goodwill
  42. Michael Gove
  43. Luke Graham
  44. Richard Graham
  45. Bill Grant
  46. Damian Green
  47. Justine Greening
  48. Dominic Grieve
  49. Sam Gyimah
  50. Philip Hammond
  51. Stephen Hammond
  52. Matt Hancock
  53. Richard Harrington
  54. Oliver Heald
  55. Peter Heaton-Jones
  56. Nick Herbert
  57. Damian Hinds
  58. Simon Hoare
  59. George Hollingbery
  60. Kevin Hollinrake
  61. John Howell
  62. Jeremy Hunt
  63. Nick Hurd
  64. Alister Jack (Teller)
  65. Margot James
  66. Sajid Javid
  67. Jo Johnson
  68. Andrew Jones
  69. Gillian Keegan
  70. Seema Kennedy
  71. Stephen Kerr
  72. Mark Lancaster
  73. Jeremy Lefroy
  74. Oliver Letwin
  75. Brandon Lewis
  76. David Lidington
  77. Paul Masterton
  78. Theresa May
  79. Patrick McLoughlin
  80. Maria Miller
  81. Anne Milton
  82. Andrew Mitchell
  83. Nicky Morgan
  84. David Mundell
  85. Robert Neill
  86. Sarah Newton
  87. Caroline Nokes
  88. Neil Parish
  89. Mark Pawsey
  90. John Penrose
  91. Claire Perry
  92. Dan Poulter
  93. Rebecca Pow
  94. Victoria Prentis
  95. Jeremy Quin
  96. Amber Rudd
  97. David Rutley
  98. Antoinette Sandbach
  99. Bob Seely
  100. Alok Sharma
  101. Alec Shelbrooke
  102. Keith Simpson
  103. Nicholas Soames
  104. Caroline Spelman
  105. John Stevenson
  106. Rory Stewart
  107. Gary Streeter
  108. Mel Stride
  109. Hugo Swire
  110. Justin Tomlinson
  111. David Tredinnick
  112. Edward Vaizey
  113. Robin Walker
  114. Jeremy Wright

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Sylvia Hermon
  2. Ivan Lewis
  3. Stephen Lloyd
  4. Chris Williamson
  5. John Woodcock

Independent Group

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Ann Coffey
  4. Mike Gapes
  5. Chris Leslie
  6. Joan Ryan
  7. Angela Smith
  8. Anna Soubry
  9. Chuka Umunna

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Kevin Barron
  10. Margaret Beckett
  11. Hilary Benn
  12. Clive Betts
  13. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  14. Paul Blomfield
  15. Tracy Brabin
  16. Ben Bradshaw
  17. Kevin Brennan
  18. Lyn Brown
  19. Nick Brown
  20. Chris Bryant
  21. Karen Buck
  22. Richard Burden
  23. Richard Burgon
  24. Dawn Butler
  25. Liam Byrne
  26. Ruth Cadbury
  27. Alan Campbell
  28. Dan Carden
  29. Sarah Champion
  30. Jenny Chapman
  31. Bambos Charalambous
  32. Ann Clwyd
  33. Vernon Coaker
  34. Julie Cooper
  35. Rosie Cooper
  36. Yvette Cooper
  37. Jeremy Corbyn
  38. Neil Coyle
  39. David Crausby
  40. Mary Creagh
  41. Stella Creasy
  42. Jon Cruddas
  43. John Cryer
  44. Judith Cummings
  45. Alex Cunningham
  46. Jim Cunningham
  47. Janet Daby
  48. Nic Dakin
  49. Wayne David
  50. Geraint Davies
  51. Marsha De Cordova
  52. Gloria de Piero
  53. Thangam Debbonaire
  54. Emma Dent Coad
  55. Tan Dhesi
  56. Annaliese Dodds
  57. Stephen Doughty
  58. Peter Dowd
  59. David Drew
  60. Jack Dromey
  61. Rosie Duffield
  62. Angela Eagle
  63. Maria Eagle
  64. Clive Efford
  65. Julie Elliott
  66. Louise Ellman
  67. Chris Elmore
  68. Bill Esterson
  69. Christopher Evans
  70. Jim Fitzpatrick
  71. Colleen Fletcher
  72. Caroline Flint
  73. Yvonne Fovargue
  74. Vicky Foxcroft
  75. James Frith
  76. Gill Furniss
  77. Hugh Gaffney
  78. Barry Gardiner
  79. Ruth George
  80. Preet Gill
  81. Mary Glindon
  82. Roger Godsiff
  83. Helen Goodman
  84. Kate Green
  85. Lilian Greenwood
  86. Margaret Greenwood
  87. Nia Griffith
  88. John Grogan
  89. Louise Haigh
  90. Fabian Hamilton
  91. David Hanson
  92. Emma Hardy
  93. Harriet Harman
  94. Carolyn Harris
  95. Helen Hayes
  96. Sue Hayman
  97. John Healey
  98. Mark Hendrick
  99. Mike Hill
  100. Meg Hillier
  101. Margaret Hodge
  102. Sharon Hodgson
  103. Kate Hollern
  104. George Howarth
  105. Rupa Huq
  106. Imran Hussain
  107. Dan Jarvis
  108. Diana Johnson
  109. Darren Jones
  110. Gerald Jones
  111. Graham Jones
  112. Helen Jones
  113. Kevan Jones
  114. Sarah Jones
  115. Susan Elan Jones
  116. Michael Kane
  117. Barbara Keeley
  118. Elizabeth Kendall
  119. Afzal Khan
  120. Gerard Killen
  121. Stephen Kinnock
  122. Peter Kyle
  123. Lesley Laird
  124. David Lammy
  125. Ian Lavery
  126. Karen Lee
  127. Emma Lewell-Buck
  128. Clive Lewis
  129. Tony Lloyd
  130. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  131. Ian Lucas
  132. Holly Lynch
  133. Justin Madders
  134. Khalid Mahmood
  135. Shabana Mahmood
  136. Seema Malhotra
  137. John Mann
  138. Gordon Marsden
  139. Sandy Martin
  140. Rachael Maskell
  141. Chris Matheson
  142. Steve McCabe
  143. Kerry McCarthy
  144. Siobhain McDonagh
  145. Andy McDonald
  146. John McDonnell
  147. Pat McFadden
  148. Conor McGinn
  149. Alison McGovern
  150. Liz McInnes
  151. Catherine McKinnell
  152. Jim McMahon
  153. Anna McMorrin
  154. Ian Mearns
  155. Ed Miliband
  156. Madeleine Moon
  157. Jessica Morden
  158. Stephen Morgan
  159. Grahame Morris
  160. Ian Murray
  161. Lisa Nandy
  162. Alex Norris
  163. Melanie Onn
  164. Chi Onwurah
  165. Kate Osamor
  166. Albert Owen
  167. Stephanie Peacock
  168. Teresa Pearce
  169. Matthew Pennycook
  170. Toby Perkins
  171. Jess Phillips
  172. Bridget Phillipson
  173. Laura Pidcock
  174. Jo Platt
  175. Luke Pollard
  176. Stephen Pound
  177. Lucy Powell
  178. Yasmin Qureshi
  179. Faisal Rashid
  180. Angela Rayner
  181. Steve Reed
  182. Christina Rees
  183. Ellie Reeves
  184. Rachel Reeves
  185. Emma Reynolds
  186. Jonathan Reynolds
  187. Marie Rimmer
  188. Geoffrey Robinson
  189. Matt Rodda
  190. Danielle Rowley
  191. Chris Ruane
  192. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  193. Naz Shah
  194. Virendra Sharma
  195. Barry Sheerman
  196. Paula Sherriff
  197. Tulip Siddiq
  198. Dennis Skinner
  199. Andy Slaughter
  200. Ruth Smeeth
  201. Cat Smith
  202. Eleanor Smith
  203. Jeff Smith
  204. Laura Smith
  205. Nick Smith
  206. Karin Smyth
  207. Gareth Snell
  208. Alex Sobel
  209. John Spellar
  210. Keir Starmer
  211. Jo Stevens
  212. Wes Streeting
  213. Paul Sweeney
  214. Mark Tami
  215. Gareth Thomas
  216. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  217. Emily Thornberry
  218. Stephen Timms
  219. Jon Trickett
  220. Anna Turley
  221. Karl Turner
  222. Derek Twigg
  223. Stephen Twigg
  224. Liz Twist
  225. Keith Vaz
  226. Valerie Vaz
  227. Thelma Walker
  228. Tom Watson
  229. Catherine West
  230. Matt Western
  231. Alan Whitehead
  232. Martin Whitfield
  233. Paul Williams
  234. Phil Wilson
  235. Mohammad Yasin
  236. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus MacNeil
  25. Stewart McDonald
  26. Stuart McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

 

THE 20 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*=======

 

Conservative

  1. Guto Bebb
  2. Richard Drax
  3. Greg Hands
  4. Gordon Henderson
  5. Phillip Lee
  6. Guy Opperman
  7. Mark Prisk
  8. Andrew Selous
  9. Julian Smith
  10. Charles Walker

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Kelvin Hopkins
  3. Jared O’Mara
  4. Fiona Onasanya

Independent Group

  1. Gavin Shuker
  2. Sarah Wollaston

Labour

  1. Ronnie Campbell
  2. Paul Farrelly
  3. Andrew Gwynne
  4. Owen Smith

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on maternity leave or on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention. One seat (Newport West) is currently vacant following the death of Paul Flynn.

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/Mark Duffy

The post MPs reject second referendum and back Government motion seeking an Article 50 extension – how all MPs voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

MPs oppose a no-deal Brexit and vote down the Malthouse B plan – how they voted

MPs spent yesterday debating the following Government motion: “That this House declines to approve leaving the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship on 29 March 2019; and notes that leaving without a deal remains the default in UK and EU law unless this House and the EU ratify […]

The post MPs oppose a no-deal Brexit and vote down the Malthouse B plan – how they voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

MPs spent yesterday debating the following Government motion:

“That this House declines to approve leaving the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship on 29 March 2019; and notes that leaving without a deal remains the default in UK and EU law unless this House and the EU ratify an agreement.”

You can watch our video highlights of the debate here, at the end of which there were votes on two amendments then a vote on the main motion, as amended.

The first amendment put to the voted had been tabled by Dame Caroline Spelman, Jack Dromey, Sir Oliver Letwin, Hilary Benn, Yvette Cooper, Nick Boles and others in order to oppose the idea of a no-deal Brexit full stop and remove the reference in the motion to leaving without a deal remaining the default option.

In the event, Dame Caroline did not want to move the amendment herself, so Yvette Cooper did so to ensure that it was put to a vote and it was passed by 312 votes to 308 – a majority of just 4.

312 MPs voted for the amendment (314 including two tellers), including 9 Conservative rebels, 234 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the 1 Green Party MP and 8 Independents. The 9 Conservative rebels were Guto Bebb, Ken Clarke, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Sam Gyimah, Phillip Lee, Antoinette Sandbach, Caroline Spelman and Ed Vaizey. 

308 MPs voted against the amendment (310 if you include the two tellers), including 293 Conservatives, all 10 DUP MPs, 6 rebel Labour MPs and 2 Independents. The 6 Labour rebels were: Ronnie Campbell, Stephen Hepburn, Kate Hoey, John Mann, Dennis Skinner and Graham Stringer.

Excluding the Speaker and his three deputies (who do not vote) and the absentee Sinn Fein MPs, there were 11 Conservative MPs who did not cast a vote – Richard Benyon, Nick Boles, Jonathan Djanogly, George Freeman, Mike Freer, Oliver Heald, Jo Johnson, Oliver  Letwin, Mark Pawsey, Keith Simpson and Nicholas Soames – and 3 Labour MPs who did not vote – Kevin Barron, Andrew Gwynne and Mohammad Yasin – although we cannot know if they were deliberate abstentions or whether they were on parliamentary business elsewhere or ill etc.

There then followed a vote on a second amendment jointly proposed by ERG figures Steve Baker, Jacob Rees-Mogg and Iain Duncan Smith; Tory Remainers Damian Green and Nicky Morgan; Simon Hart of the middle-of-the-road Brexit Delivery Group; and DUP Westminster Leader Nigel Dodds which seeks to put the Malthouse Compromise Plan B into effect. This asked the Government to follow a course of action which would involve:

  • Publishing the UK’s Day One Tariff Schedules immediately [which actually happened yesterday morning]
  • Seeking an extension of Article 50 to 10.59pm on 22nd May 2019, at which point the UK would leave the EU, to allow businesses to prepare for the operation of the aforementioned tariffs
  • Offering a further set of mutual standstill agreements with the EU and Member States for an agreed period ending no later than 30th December 2021, during which period the UK would pay an agreed sum equivalent to its net EU contributions and satisfy its other public international law obligations, in a spirit of co-operation and in order to begin discussions on the future relationship
  • Unilaterally guaranteeing the rights of EU citizens resident in the UK

Crucially, this was a free vote for Conservative MPs, nearly 100 of whom abstained, so it saw senior ministers voting in both division lobbies, but in the event it was defeated by 374 votes to 164 – a majority of 210. 

A total of 164 MPs backed the amendment (166 including two tellers), including 151 Conservatives, all 10 DUP MPs, 4 Labour MPs (Ronnie Campbell, Kate Hoey, Dennis Skinner and Graham Stringer) and 1 Independent.

The 151 Tory MPs backing it were:

Nigel Adams, Adam Afriyie, Peter Aldous, Lucy Allan, David Amess, Stuart Andrew, Kemi Badenoch, Steve Baker, Henry Bellingham, Jake Berry, Bob Blackman, Crispin Blunt, Graham Brady, Suella Braverman, Andrew Bridgen, Fiona Bruce, Robert Buckland, Alex Burghart, Conor Burns, Alun Cairns, Colin Clark, Simon Clarke, Geoffrey Clifton-Brown, Therese Coffey, Damian Collins, Robert Courts, Chris Davies, David T. C. Davies, Glyn Davies, Philip Davies, David Davis, Michelle Donelan, Nadine Dorries, James Duddridge, Iain Duncan Smith, Philip Dunne, Michael Ellis, Charlie Elphicke, George Eustice, Nigel Evans, David Evennett, Michael Fabricant, Michael Fallon, Mark Francois, Lucy Frazer, Marcus Fysh, Mark Garnier, Cheryl Gillan, Zac Goldsmith, Helen Grant, James Gray, Chris Green, Damian Green, Kirstene Hair, Greg Hands, Rebecca Harris, Trudy Harrison, Simon Hart, John Hayes, James Heappey, Chris Heaton-Harris, Gordon Henderson, Adam Holloway, Eddie Hughes, Jeremy Hunt, Alister Jack, Sajid Javid, Ranil Jayawardena, Bernard Jenkin, Andrea Jenkyns, Robert Jenrick, Boris Johnson, Caroline Johnson, Gareth Johnson, Andrew Jones, David Jones, Daniel Kawczynski, Julian Knight, Greg Knight, Kwasi Kwarteng, John Lamont, Mark Lancaster, Pauline Latham, Andrea Leadsom, Andrew Lewer, Ian Liddell-Grainger, Julia Lopez, Jack Lopresti, Jonathan Lord, Tim Loughton, Craig Mackinlay, Rachel Maclean, Kit Malthouse, Scott Mann, Paul Maynard, Patrick McLoughlin, Esther McVey, Mark Menzies, Stephen Metcalfe, Maria Miller, Nigel Mills, Andrew Mitchell, Penny Mordaunt, Nicky Morgan, Sheryll Murray, Andrew Murrison, Neil Parish, Priti Patel, Owen Paterson, Mike Penning, John Penrose, Chris Philp, Dan Poulter, Mark Prisk, Tom Pursglove, Will Quince, Dominic Raab, Jacob Rees-Mogg, Laurence Robertson, Mary Robinson, Andrew Rosindell, Lee Rowley, Paul Scully, Bob Seely, Andrew Selous, Grant Shapps, Alec Shelbrooke, Henry Smith, Royston Smith, Bob Stewart, Iain Stewart, Julian Sturdy, Rishi Sunak, Desmond Swayne, Hugo Swire, Derek Thomas, Ross Thomson, Justin Tomlinson, Michael Tomlinson, Craig Tracey, Theresa Villiers, Charles Walker, Ben Wallace, David Warburton, Helen Whately, Heather Wheeler, John Whittingdale, Bill Wiggin, Gavin Williamson, William Wragg and Nadhim Zahawi.

But a total of 374 MPs opposed it (376 including two tellers), including 68 Conservatives, 238 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the 1 Green Party MP and 8 Independents.

The 68 Tory MPs opposing it were:

Richard Bacon, Guto Bebb, Nick Boles, Peter Bone, Jack Brereton, Steve Brine, Alistair Burt, James Cartlidge, Alex Chalk, Jo Churchill, Greg Clark, Kenneth Clarke, Stephen Crabb, Tracey Crouch, Jonathan Djanogly, Steve Double, Jackie Doyle-Price, Mark Field, Vicky Ford, Kevin Foster, Roger Gale, David Gauke, Nick Gibb, Bill Grant, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Andrew Griffiths, Sam Gyimah, Luke Hall, Richard Harrington, Oliver Heald, Peter Heaton-Jones, Simon Hoare, Philip Hollobone, John Howell, Nigel Huddleston, Margot James, Marcus Jones, Phillip Lee, Oliver Letwin, David Lidington, Alan Mak, Paul Masterton, Johnny Mercer, Huw Merriman, Anne Milton, Damien Moore, Anne Marie Morris, David Morris, James Morris, Robert Neill, Andrew Percy, Claire Perry, Victoria Prentis, Mark Pritchard, Douglas Ross, Amber Rudd, Antoinette Sandbach, Chloe Smith, Nicholas Soames, Caroline Spelman, Rory Stewart, Gary Streeter, Kelly Tolhurst, Edward Vaizey, Matt Warman, Giles Watling and Mike Wood.

There then followed a vote on the main motion as amended – which was effectively a re-run of the vote on the first amendment opposing the idea of a no-deal Brexit full stop since the text of it replaced the original motion.

For the Conservatives, this has swiftly become highly controversial because it was subject to a three line whip, yet more than a dozen ministers and whips abstained and do not appear to have been disciplined. One minister, DWP minister Sarah Newton, did resign in order to vote in favour of the motion as amended, which passed by 321 votes to 278 – a majority of 43.

321 MPs backed the motion (323 including two tellers), including 17 Conservative rebels, 237 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the 1 Green Party MP and 7 Independents.

Those 17 Conservative rebels were: Guto Bebb, Richard Benyon, Nick Boles, Ken Clarke, Jonathan Djanogly, George Freeman, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Sam Gyimah, Phillip Lee, Oliver Letwin, Paul Masterton, Sarah Newton, Mark Pawsey, Antoinette Sandbach, Nicholas Soames and Ed Vaizey.

Only 278 MPs opposed the motion (280 including two tellers), including 267 Conservative MPs, all 10 DUP MPs, 2 Labour MPs (Stephen Hepburn and Kate Hoey) and 1 Independent.

So it was the abstentions that were most eye-catching here. Excluding the Speaker and his three deputies and the absentee Sinn Fein MPs, there were no fewer than 29 Conservative MPs who did not cast a vote, along with 4 Labour MPs – Kevin Barron, Andrew Gwynne, John Mann and Graham Stringer – and Independents Frank Field and Kelvin Hopkins (again with the proviso that we cannot know if they were deliberate abstentions or whether they were on parliamentary business elsewhere or ill etc.)

Those 29 Tory absentees included numerous ministers, whips and parliamentary aides, including Cabinet ministers Greg Clark, David Gauke, David Mundell and Amber Rudd.

The full list of Conservatives abstaining was as follows: Bim Afolami (PPS), Robert Buckland (minister), Alistair Burt (minister), Greg Clark (minister), Alberto Costa, Stephen Crabb, Tobias Ellwood (minister), Vicky Ford (PPS), Mike Freer (whip), David Gauke (minister), Richard Graham, Damian Green, Stephen Hammond (minister), Richard Harrington (minister), Oliver Heald, Peter Heaton-Jones (PPS), Simon Hoare (PPS), Nigel Huddleston (party vice chair), Margot James (minister), Jo Johnson, Jeremy Lefroy, Anne Milton (minister), David Mundell (minister), Claire Perry (minister), Victoria Prentis (PPS), Amber Rudd (minister), Keith Simpson, Caroline Spelman and Gary Streeter.

Photocredit: ©UK Parliament/JessicaTaylor

The post MPs oppose a no-deal Brexit and vote down the Malthouse B plan – how they voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

MPs reject Theresa May’s Brexit deal again – by a 149 majority. Here’s how every MP voted

Just under a couple of months since the Brexit deal was reject by a majority of 230, the House of Commons has now voted down the Government’s draft Withdrawal Agreement for a second time. The motion sought, in line with Section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, to approve the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement […]

The post MPs reject Theresa May’s Brexit deal again – by a 149 majority. Here’s how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Just under a couple of months since the Brexit deal was reject by a majority of 230, the House of Commons has now voted down the Government’s draft Withdrawal Agreement for a second time.

The motion sought, in line with Section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, to approve the negotiated Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration laid before the House as well as the new documents published yesterday following Theresa May’s late-night meeting in Strasbourg with Jean-Claude Juncker – but MPs rejected the motion by 391 votes to 242 – a majority of 149.

242 MPs voted for the deal (244 if you include the two tellers), including 237 Conservatives, 3 Labour MPs and 4 Independents. 39 of the Conservatives had opposed the deal in January (identified below).

Meanwhile, 391 MPs voted against the deal (393 including two tellers), including 75 Conservative rebels, 240 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 TIG MPs all 11 Lib Dem MPs and all 10 DUP MPs, along with the 4 MPs from Plaid Cymru, the 1 Green Party MP and 6 Independents.

Below are full lists of which MPs voted against the deal, those who did not vote at all (although NB it is impossible to know whether they deliberately abstained, were away from Westminster on parliamentary business elsewhere or were ill etc.) and of course the full list of those who voted for the deal.

THE 393 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE DEAL===============

Conservative

  1. Adam Afriyie
  2. Lucy Allan
  3. Richard Bacon
  4. Steve Baker
  5. John Baron
  6. Guto Bebb
  7. Crispin Blunt
  8. Peter Bone
  9. Suella Braverman
  10. Andrew Bridgen
  11. Conor Burns
  12. William Cash
  13. Rehman Chishti
  14. Christopher Chope
  15. Simon Clarke
  16. Damian Collins
  17. Robert Courts
  18. Richard Drax
  19. James Duddridge
  20. Iain Duncan Smith
  21. Charlie Elphicke
  22. Michael Fabricant
  23. Michael Fallon
  24. Mark Francois
  25. Marcus Fysh
  26. James Gray
  27. Chris Green
  28. Justine Greening
  29. Dominic Grieve
  30. Sam Gyimah
  31. Mark Harper
  32. Gordon Henderson
  33. Philip Hollobone
  34. Adam Holloway
  35. Eddie Hughes
  36. Ranil Jayawardena
  37. Bernard Jenkin
  38. Andrea Jenkyns
  39. Boris Johnson
  40. Gareth Johnson
  41. Jo Johnson
  42. David Jones
  43. Daniel Kawczynski
  44. Pauline Latham
  45. Phillip Lee
  46. Andrew Lewer
  47. Julian Lewis
  48. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  49. Julia Lopez
  50. Jonathan Lord
  51. Craig Mackinlay
  52. Anne Main
  53. Esther McVey
  54. Anne Marie Morris
  55. Sheryll Murray
  56. Priti Patel
  57. Owen Paterson
  58. Tom Pursglove
  59. Dominic Raab
  60. John Redwood
  61. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  62. Laurence Robertson
  63. Andrew Rosindell
  64. Lee Rowley
  65. Grant Shapps
  66. Henry Smith
  67. Royston Smith
  68. Bob Stewart
  69. Ross Thomson
  70. Michael Tomlinson
  71. Craig Tracey
  72. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  73. Shailesh Vara
  74. Theresa Villiers
  75. John Whittingdale

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Kelvin Hopkins
  2. Ivan Lewis
  3. Jared O’Mara
  4. Fiona Onasanya
  5. Chris Williamson
  6. John Woodcock

Independent Group

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. Luciana Berger
  3. Ann Coffey
  4. Mike Gapes
  5. Chris Leslie
  6. Joan Ryan
  7. Gavin Shuker
  8. Angela Smith
  9. Anna Soubry
  10. Chuka Umunna
  11. Sarah Wollaston

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Clive Betts
  12. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  13. Paul Blomfield
  14. Tracy Brabin
  15. Ben Bradshaw
  16. Kevin Brennan
  17. Lyn Brown
  18. Nick Brown
  19. Chris Bryant
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Alan Campbell
  27. Ronnie Campbell
  28. Dan Carden
  29. Sarah Champion
  30. Jenny Chapman
  31. Bambos Charalambous
  32. Ann Clwyd
  33. Vernon Coaker
  34. Julie Cooper
  35. Rosie Cooper
  36. Yvette Cooper
  37. Jeremy Corbyn
  38. Neil Coyle
  39. David Crausby
  40. Mary Creagh
  41. Stella Creasy
  42. Jon Cruddas
  43. John Cryer
  44. Judith Cummings
  45. Alex Cunningham
  46. Jim Cunningham
  47. Janet Daby
  48. Nic Dakin (Teller)
  49. Wayne David
  50. Geraint Davies
  51. Marsha De Cordova
  52. Gloria de Piero
  53. Thangam Debbonaire (Teller)
  54. Emma Dent Coad
  55. Tan Dhesi
  56. Annaliese Dodds
  57. Stephen Doughty
  58. Peter Dowd
  59. David Drew
  60. Jack Dromey
  61. Rosie Duffield
  62. Angela Eagle
  63. Maria Eagle
  64. Clive Efford
  65. Julie Elliott
  66. Louise Ellman
  67. Chris Elmore
  68. Bill Esterson
  69. Christopher Evans
  70. Paul Farrelly
  71. Jim Fitzpatrick
  72. Colleen Fletcher
  73. Yvonne Fovargue
  74. Vicky Foxcroft
  75. James Frith
  76. Gill Furniss
  77. Hugh Gaffney
  78. Barry Gardiner
  79. Ruth George
  80. Preet Gill
  81. Mary Glindon
  82. Roger Godsiff
  83. Helen Goodman
  84. Kate Green
  85. Lilian Greenwood
  86. Margaret Greenwood
  87. Nia Griffith
  88. John Grogan
  89. Andrew Gwynne
  90. Louise Haigh
  91. Fabian Hamilton
  92. David Hanson
  93. Emma Hardy
  94. Harriet Harman
  95. Carolyn Harris
  96. Helen Hayes
  97. Sue Hayman
  98. John Healey
  99. Mark Hendrick
  100. Stephen Hepburn
  101. Mike Hill
  102. Meg Hillier
  103. Margaret Hodge
  104. Sharon Hodgson
  105. Kate Hoey
  106. Kate Hollern
  107. George Howarth
  108. Rupa Huq
  109. Imran Hussain
  110. Dan Jarvis
  111. Diana Johnson
  112. Darren Jones
  113. Gerald Jones
  114. Graham Jones
  115. Helen Jones
  116. Kevan Jones
  117. Sarah Jones
  118. Susan Elan Jones
  119. Michael Kane
  120. Barbara Keeley
  121. Elizabeth Kendall
  122. Afzal Khan
  123. Gerard Killen
  124. Stephen Kinnock
  125. Peter Kyle
  126. Lesley Laird
  127. David Lammy
  128. Ian Lavery
  129. Karen Lee
  130. Emma Lewell-Buck
  131. Clive Lewis
  132. Tony Lloyd
  133. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  134. Ian Lucas
  135. Holly Lynch
  136. Justin Madders
  137. Khalid Mahmood
  138. Shabana Mahmood
  139. Seema Malhotra
  140. Gordon Marsden
  141. Sandy Martin
  142. Rachael Maskell
  143. Chris Matheson
  144. Steve McCabe
  145. Kerry McCarthy
  146. Siobhain McDonagh
  147. Andy McDonald
  148. John McDonnell
  149. Pat McFadden
  150. Conor McGinn
  151. Alison McGovern
  152. Liz McInnes
  153. Catherine McKinnell
  154. Jim McMahon
  155. Anna McMorrin
  156. Ian Mearns
  157. Ed Miliband
  158. Madeleine Moon
  159. Jessica Morden
  160. Stephen Morgan
  161. Grahame Morris
  162. Ian Murray
  163. Lisa Nandy
  164. Alex Norris
  165. Melanie Onn
  166. Chi Onwurah
  167. Kate Osamor
  168. Albert Owen
  169. Stephanie Peacock
  170. Teresa Pearce
  171. Matthew Pennycook
  172. Toby Perkins
  173. Jess Phillips
  174. Bridget Phillipson
  175. Laura Pidcock
  176. Jo Platt
  177. Luke Pollard
  178. Stephen Pound
  179. Lucy Powell
  180. Yasmin Qureshi
  181. Faisal Rashid
  182. Angela Rayner
  183. Steve Reed
  184. Christina Rees
  185. Ellie Reeves
  186. Rachel Reeves
  187. Emma Reynolds
  188. Jonathan Reynolds
  189. Marie Rimmer
  190. Geoffrey Robinson
  191. Matt Rodda
  192. Danielle Rowley
  193. Chris Ruane
  194. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  195. Naz Shah
  196. Virendra Sharma
  197. Barry Sheerman
  198. Paula Sherriff
  199. Tulip Siddiq
  200. Dennis Skinner
  201. Andy Slaughter
  202. Ruth Smeeth
  203. Cat Smith
  204. Eleanor Smith
  205. Jeff Smith
  206. Laura Smith
  207. Nick Smith
  208. Owen Smith
  209. Karin Smyth
  210. Gareth Snell
  211. Alex Sobel
  212. John Spellar
  213. Keir Starmer
  214. Jo Stevens
  215. Wes Streeting
  216. Graham Stringer
  217. Paul Sweeney
  218. Mark Tami
  219. Gareth Thomas
  220. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  221. Emily Thornberry
  222. Stephen Timms
  223. Jon Trickett
  224. Anna Turley
  225. Karl Turner
  226. Derek Twigg
  227. Stephen Twigg
  228. Liz Twist
  229. Keith Vaz
  230. Valerie Vaz
  231. Thelma Walker
  232. Tom Watson
  233. Catherine West
  234. Matt Western
  235. Alan Whitehead
  236. Martin Whitfield
  237. Paul Williams
  238. Phil Wilson
  239. Mohammad Yasin
  240. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus MacNeil
  25. Stewart McDonald
  26. Stuart McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

 

1 MPS DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*==========

Conservative

  1. Douglas Ross (supporting his wife in advance of his child’s birth; he voted against in January)

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats. The Newport West seat is vacant, pending a by-election.

THE 244 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE DEAL===============

 

Conservative (Ministers/Whips in bold italics, PPSs/Party Vice-Chairs/Deputy Chair in bold)

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Peter Aldous
  4. David Amess (voted against in January)
  5. Stuart Andrew
  6. Edward Argar
  7. Victoria Atkins
  8. Kemi Badenoch
  9. Harriett Baldwin
  10. Steve Barclay
  11. Henry Bellingham
  12. Richard Benyon
  13. Paul Beresford
  14. Jake Berry
  15. Bob Blackman (voted against in January)
  16. Nick Boles
  17. Peter Bottomley
  18. Andrew Bowie
  19. Ben Bradley (voted against in January)
  20. Karen Bradley
  21. Graham Brady (voted against in January)
  22. Jack Brereton
  23. Steve Brine
  24. James Brokenshire
  25. Fiona Bruce (voted against in January)
  26. Robert Buckland
  27. Alex Burghart
  28. Alistair Burt
  29. Alun Cairns
  30. James Cartlidge
  31. Maria Caulfield (voted against in January)
  32. Alex Chalk
  33. Jo Churchill
  34. Colin Clark
  35. Greg Clark
  36. Kenneth Clarke
  37. James Cleverly
  38. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  39. Thérèse Coffey
  40. Alberto Costa
  41. Geoffrey Cox
  42. Stephen Crabb
  43. Tracey Crouch (voted against in January)
  44. Chris Davies
  45. David Davies
  46. Glyn Davies
  47. Mims Davies
  48. Philip Davies (voted against in January)
  49. David Davis (voted against in January)
  50. Caroline Dinenage
  51. Jonathan Djanogly
  52. Leo Docherty
  53. Michelle Donelan
  54. Nadine Dorries (voted against in January)
  55. Steve Double (voted against in January)
  56. Oliver Dowden
  57. Jackie Doyle-Price
  58. David Duguid
  59. Alan Duncan
  60. Philip Dunne
  61. Michael Ellis
  62. Tobias Ellwood
  63. George Eustice
  64. Nigel Evans (voted against in January)
  65. David Evennett (voted against in January)
  66. Mark Field
  67. Vicky Ford
  68. Kevin Foster
  69. Liam Fox
  70. Lucy Frazer
  71. George Freeman
  72. Mike Freer
  73. Roger Gale
  74. Mark Garnier
  75. David Gauke
  76. Nusrat Ghani
  77. Nick Gibb
  78. Cheryl Gillan
  79. John Glen
  80. Zac Goldsmith (voted against in January)
  81. Robert Goodwill
  82. Michael Gove
  83. Luke Graham
  84. Richard Graham
  85. Bill Grant
  86. Helen Grant
  87. Chris Grayling
  88. Damian Green
  89. Andrew Griffiths
  90. Kirstene Hair
  91. Robert Halfon (voted against in January)
  92. Luke Hall
  93. Philip Hammond
  94. Stephen Hammond
  95. Matt Hancock
  96. Greg Hands (voted against in January)
  97. Richard Harrington
  98. Rebecca Harris
  99. Trudy Harrison
  100. Simon Hart
  101. John Hayes (voted against in January)
  102. Oliver Heald
  103. James Heappey
  104. Chris Heaton-Harris
  105. Peter Heaton-Jones
  106. Nick Herbert
  107. Damian Hinds
  108. Simon Hoare
  109. George Hollingbery
  110. Kevin Hollinrake
  111. John Howell
  112. Nigel Huddleston
  113. Jeremy Hunt
  114. Nick Hurd
  115. Alister Jack
  116. Margot James
  117. Sajid Javid
  118. Robert Jenrick
  119. Caroline Johnson
  120. Andrew Jones
  121. Marcus Jones
  122. Gillian Keegan
  123. Seema Kennedy
  124. Stephen Kerr
  125. Greg Knight (voted against in January)
  126. Julian Knight
  127. Kwasi Kwarteng
  128. John Lamont (voted against in January)
  129. Mark Lancaster
  130. Andrea Leadsom
  131. Jeremy Lefroy
  132. Edward Leigh
  133. Oliver Letwin
  134. Brandon Lewis
  135. David Lidington
  136. Jack Lopresti
  137. Tim Loughton (voted against in January)
  138. Rachel Maclean
  139. Alan Mak
  140. Kit Malthouse
  141. Scott Mann (voted against in January)
  142. Paul Masterton
  143. Theresa May
  144. Paul Maynard
  145. Patrick McLoughlin
  146. Stephen McPartland (voted against in January)
  147. Mark Menzies
  148. Johnny Mercer (voted against in January)
  149. Huw Merriman
  150. Stephen Metcalfe (voted against in January)
  151. Maria Miller
  152. Amanda Milling
  153. Nigel Mills (voted against in January)
  154. Anne Milton
  155. Andrew Mitchell (voted against in January)
  156. Damien Moore (voted against in January)
  157. Penny Mordaunt
  158. Nicky Morgan
  159. David Morris
  160. James Morris
  161. Wendy Morton
  162. David Mundell
  163. Andrew Murrison
  164. Bob Neill
  165. Sarah Newton
  166. Caroline Nokes
  167. Jesse Norman
  168. Neil O’Brien
  169. Matthew Offord (voted against in January)
  170. Guy Opperman
  171. Neil Parish
  172. Mark Pawsey
  173. Mike Penning (voted against in January)
  174. John Penrose
  175. Andrew Percy
  176. Claire Perry
  177. Chris Philp
  178. Christopher Pincher
  179. Daniel Poulter
  180. Rebecca Pow
  181. Victoria Prentis
  182. Mark Prisk
  183. Mark Pritchard (voted against in January)
  184. Jeremy Quin
  185. Will Quince (voted against in January)
  186. Mary Robinson
  187. Amber Rudd
  188. David Rutley
  189. Antoinette Sandbach
  190. Paul Scully
  191. Bob Seely
  192. Andrew Selous
  193. Alok Sharma
  194. Alec Shelbrooke
  195. Keith Simpson
  196. Chris Skidmore
  197. Chloe Smith
  198. Julian Smith
  199. Nicholas Soames
  200. Caroline Spelman
  201. Mark Spencer
  202. Andrew Stephenson (Teller)
  203. John Stevenson
  204. Iain Stewart (Teller)
  205. Rory Stewart
  206. Gary Streeter
  207. Mel Stride
  208. Graham Stuart
  209. Julian Sturdy (voted against in January)
  210. Rishi Sunak
  211. Desmond Swayne
  212. Hugo Swire (voted against in January)
  213. Robert Syms (voted against in January)
  214. Derek Thomas (voted against in January)
  215. Maggie Throup
  216. Kelly Tolhurst
  217. Justin Tomlinson
  218. David Tredinnick
  219. Elizabeth Truss
  220. Thomas Tugendhat
  221. Edward Vaizey
  222. Martin Vickers (voted against in January)
  223. Charles Walker
  224. Robin Walker
  225. Ben Wallace
  226. David Warburton
  227. Matt Warman
  228. Giles Watling (voted against in January)
  229. Helen Whately
  230. Heather Wheeler
  231. Craig Whittaker
  232. Bill Wiggin (voted against in January)
  233. Gavin Williamson
  234. Mike Wood
  235. William Wragg (voted against in January)
  236. Jeremy Wright
  237. Nadhim Zahawi

Independent

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Frank Field
  3. Sylvia Hermon
  4. Stephen Lloyd

Labour

  1. Kevin Barron
  2. Caroline Flint (voted against in January)
  3. John Mann

The post MPs reject Theresa May’s Brexit deal again – by a 149 majority. Here’s how every MP voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Meet the eight lawyers who will judge whether ‘Cox’s codpiece’ cuts the mustard

Following the passing of the Brady amendment in January, the Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox QC, is currently engaged in talks with the EU in search of a legal change that will ensure the Northern Ireland backstop cannot endure indefinitely – what some have termed ‘Cox’s codpiece’. And the fate of the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal […]

The post Meet the eight lawyers who will judge whether ‘Cox’s codpiece’ cuts the mustard appeared first on BrexitCentral.

Following the passing of the Brady amendment in January, the Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox QC, is currently engaged in talks with the EU in search of a legal change that will ensure the Northern Ireland backstop cannot endure indefinitely – what some have termed ‘Cox’s codpiece’.

And the fate of the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal – when it is put to another meaningful vote within the next fortnight – is likely to hinge on whether what he brings back from Brussels cuts the mustard with Brexiteers on the government backbenches.

So I can reveal today that as they await a breakthrough in the talks, Tory eurosceptics have assembled a panel of eight lawyers – seven of whom are serving MPs – to examine forensically whatever proposal is forthcoming and judge whether it makes the deal acceptable.

They are:

  • Sir Bill Cash – Chair of the European Scrutiny Committee whose knowledge of constitutional law has been oft-shared in the Commons during his 35 years in Parliament
  • Dominic Raab – Former Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union who resigned to oppose the Brexit deal as currently drafted and whose legal career included time advising on EU law both as a solicitor with Linklaters and at the Foreign Office
  • Nigel Dodds – DUP Deputy Leader and the party’s Westminster Leader who was a prize-winning Law student at Cambridge who was then called to the Bar of Northern Ireland
  • David Jones – Former Minister of State at the Department for Exiting the European Union and Secretary of State for Wales who worked as a solicitor for more than a quarter of a century before entering politics
  • Suella Braverman – Ex-Chair of the European Research Group and former Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Exiting the European Union who resigned to oppose the Brexit deal as currently drafted, she practised as a barrister for a decade before becoming an MP and holds a Masters Degree in European Law
  • Michael Tomlinson – Former Deputy Chairman of the European Research Group who was a barrister prior to entering Parliament
  • Robert Courts – European Research Group supporter who was also a barrister prior to entering Parliament
  • Martin Howe QC – Chair of lawyers for Britain and the only non-MP of the octet, he was called to the Bar in 1978 and appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1996 and is arguably the most prominent eurosceptic barrister, having amassed an immense knowledge of EU law during his legal career

The inclusion of Dodds in the group is especially significant, since an acceptance of any change to the deal from the Government’s confidence and supply partners in the DUP would likely pile pressure on Tory backbench Brexiteers to follow suit.

A source close to the group explains to me: “Tory MPs from the European Research Group may have vehemently voted down the Prime Minister’s deal, but they are equally keen to back a deal if the necessary changes are forthcoming to make it acceptable. This is a serious group of respected legal and political minds who will be as well equipped as anyone to make the judgement as to whether whatever Geoffrey Cox negotiates merits their support.”

The post Meet the eight lawyers who will judge whether ‘Cox’s codpiece’ cuts the mustard appeared first on BrexitCentral.

66 Tories abstain as MPs defeat Government on Brexit strategy motion – how they all voted

The House of Commons has defeated by 303 votes to 258 – a majority of 45 – a Government motion reiterating support for the approach to Brexit expressed by the Commons on 29th January after dozens of Conservative MPs refused to back an effective endorsement of taking the no-deal option off the table. The background to […]

The post 66 Tories abstain as MPs defeat Government on Brexit strategy motion – how they all voted appeared first on BrexitCentral.

The House of Commons has defeated by 303 votes to 258 – a majority of 45 – a Government motion reiterating support for the approach to Brexit expressed by the Commons on 29th January after dozens of Conservative MPs refused to back an effective endorsement of taking the no-deal option off the table.

The background to the rebellion can be read in my piece here explaining why Tory MPs from the European Research Group were unhappy with the motion, which Steve Baker explained should have been pulled and replaced with “a neutral motion and the adoption of Malthouse Compromise… around which there is a majority”. The ERG Deputy Chairman later described the events as a “storm in a teacup” and pointed out that the Prime Minister has a mandate from the previous vote on the Brady amendment.

A Downing Street spokesman responded to the result of the vote by saying:

“Jeremy Corbyn yet again put partisan considerations ahead of the national interest – and yet again, by voting against the Government’s motion, he is in effect voting to make no deal more likely. While we didn’t secure the support of the Commons this evening, the Prime Minister continues to believe, and the debate itself indicated, that far from objecting to securing changes to the backstop that will allow us to leave with a deal, there was a concern from some Conservative colleagues about taking no deal off the table at this stage. The motion on 29th January remains the only one the House of Commons has passed expressing what it does want – and that is legally binding changes to address concerns about the backstop. The Government will continue to pursue this with the EU to ensure we leave on time on 29th March.”

The full analysis of who voted which way on the main motion is below, but first it is also worth noting that beforehand 41 Labour MPs, along with two Conservative MPs, defied their whips to abstain on and oppose respectively an SNP amendment seeking an extension to the Article 50 period of at least three months. The MPs joining the full complement of SNP, Plaid Cymru, Lib Dem and Green MPs backing the amendment for the extension were: 

Conservative

  1. Ken Clarke
  2. Sarah Wollaston

Independent

  1. John Woodcock 

Labour

  1. Debbie Abrahams
  2. Tonia Antoniazzi
  3. Luciana Berger
  4. Ben Bradshaw
  5. Karen Buck
  6. Ruth Cadbury
  7. Ann Clwyd
  8. Ann Coffey
  9. Neil Coyle
  10. Mary Creagh
  11. Stella Creasy
  12. Janet Daby
  13. Geraint Davies
  14. Rosie Duffield
  15. Paul Farrelly
  16. Mike Gapes
  17. Kate Green
  18. Helen Hayes
  19. Meg Hillier
  20. Margaret Hodge
  21. Susan Elan Jones
  22. Ged Killen
  23. David Lammy
  24. Chris Leslie
  25. Anna McMorrin
  26. Madeleine Moon
  27. Ian Murray
  28. Albert Owen
  29. Barry Sheerman
  30. Gavin Shuker
  31. Andy Slaughter
  32. Angela Smith
  33. Owen Smith
  34. Jo Stevens
  35. Gareth Thomas
  36. Chuka Umunna
  37. Keith Vaz
  38. Catherine West
  39. Martin Whitfield
  40. Paul Williams
  41. Daniel Zeichner

Back to the main motion and the voting figures were as follows:

259 MPs voted for the motion (261 if you include the two tellers), including 245 Conservatives, 4 Labour MPs and all 10 DUP MPs and 2 Independents (although the result was announced in the chamber as 258 voting for it).

Meanwhile, 303 MPs voted against the motion (305 including two tellers), including 5 Conservatives, 246 Labour MPs, all 35 SNP MPs, all 11 Lib Dem MPs, along with MPs from Plaid Cymru, the Green Party and 3 Independents.

But, significantly, among the MPs abstaining were 66 Conservative MPs, including supporters of the ERG as well as Remain backers seeking to block Brexit.

The full division list is as follows

THE 303 MPs WHO OPPOSED THE MOTION===========

 

Conservative

  1. Peter Bone
  2. Christopher Chope
  3. Philip Hollobone
  4. Anne Marie Morris
  5. Sarah Wollaston

Green

  1. Caroline Lucas

Independent

  1. Sylvia Hermon
  2. Jared O’Mara
  3. John Woodcock

Labour

  1. Diane Abbott
  2. Debbie Abrahams
  3. Rushanara Ali
  4. Rosena Allin-Khan
  5. Mike Amesbury
  6. Tonia Antoniazzi
  7. Jonathan Ashworth
  8. Adrian Bailey
  9. Margaret Beckett
  10. Hilary Benn
  11. Luciana Berger
  12. Clive Betts
  13. Roberta Blackman-Woods
  14. Paul Blomfield
  15. Tracy Brabin
  16. Ben Bradshaw
  17. Kevin Brennan
  18. Lyn Brown
  19. Nick Brown
  20. Karen Buck
  21. Richard Burden
  22. Richard Burgon
  23. Dawn Butler
  24. Liam Byrne
  25. Ruth Cadbury
  26. Alan Campbell
  27. Ronnie Campbell
  28. Dan Carden
  29. Sarah Champion
  30. Jenny Chapman
  31. Bambos Charalambous
  32. Ann Clwyd
  33. Vernon Coaker
  34. Ann Coffey
  35. Julie Cooper
  36. Rosie Cooper
  37. Yvette Cooper
  38. Jeremy Corbyn
  39. Neil Coyle
  40. David Crausby
  41. Mary Creagh
  42. Stella Creasy
  43. Jon Cruddas
  44. John Cryer
  45. Judith Cummings
  46. Alex Cunningham
  47. Jim Cunningham
  48. Janet Daby
  49. Nic Dakin
  50. Wayne David
  51. Geraint Davies
  52. Marsha De Cordova
  53. Gloria de Piero
  54. Thangam Debbonaire (Teller)
  55. Emma Dent Coad
  56. Tan Dhesi
  57. Annaliese Dodds
  58. Stephen Doughty
  59. Peter Dowd
  60. David Drew
  61. Jack Dromey
  62. Rosie Duffield
  63. Angela Eagle
  64. Maria Eagle
  65. Clive Efford
  66. Julie Elliott
  67. Louise Ellman
  68. Chris Elmore
  69. Bill Esterson
  70. Christopher Evans
  71. Paul Farrelly
  72. Colleen Fletcher
  73. Yvonne Fovargue
  74. Vicky Foxcroft
  75. James Frith
  76. Gill Furniss
  77. Hugh Gaffney
  78. Mike Gapes
  79. Barry Gardiner
  80. Ruth George
  81. Preet Gill
  82. Mary Glindon
  83. Roger Godsiff
  84. Helen Goodman
  85. Kate Green
  86. Lilian Greenwood
  87. Margaret Greenwood
  88. Nia Griffith
  89. John Grogan
  90. Andrew Gwynne
  91. Louise Haigh
  92. Fabian Hamilton
  93. David Hanson
  94. Emma Hardy
  95. Harriet Harman
  96. Carolyn Harris
  97. Helen Hayes
  98. Sue Hayman
  99. John Healey
  100. Mark Hendrick
  101. Stephen Hepburn
  102. Mike Hill
  103. Meg Hillier
  104. Margaret Hodge
  105. Sharon Hodgson
  106. Kate Hollern
  107. George Howarth
  108. Rupa Huq
  109. Imran Hussain
  110. Dan Jarvis
  111. Diana Johnson
  112. Darren Jones
  113. Gerald Jones
  114. Graham Jones
  115. Helen Jones
  116. Kevan Jones
  117. Sarah Jones
  118. Susan Elan Jones
  119. Michael Kane
  120. Barbara Keeley
  121. Elizabeth Kendall
  122. Afzal Khan
  123. Gerard Killen
  124. Stephen Kinnock
  125. Peter Kyle
  126. Lesley Laird
  127. David Lammy
  128. Ian Lavery
  129. Karen Lee
  130. Christopher Leslie
  131. Emma Lewell-Buck
  132. Clive Lewis
  133. Tony Lloyd
  134. Rebecca Long-Bailey
  135. Ian Lucas
  136. Holly Lynch
  137. Justin Madders
  138. Khalid Mahmood
  139. Shabana Mahmood
  140. Seema Malhotra
  141. Gordon Marsden
  142. Sandy Martin
  143. Rachael Maskell
  144. Chris Matheson
  145. Steve McCabe
  146. Kerry McCarthy
  147. Siobhain McDonagh
  148. Andy McDonald
  149. John McDonnell
  150. Pat McFadden
  151. Conor McGinn
  152. Alison McGovern
  153. Liz McInnes
  154. Catherine McKinnell
  155. Jim McMahon
  156. Anna McMorrin
  157. Ian Mearns
  158. Ed Miliband
  159. Madeleine Moon
  160. Jessica Morden
  161. Stephen Morgan
  162. Grahame Morris
  163. Ian Murray
  164. Lisa Nandy
  165. Alex Norris
  166. Melanie Onn
  167. Chi Onwurah
  168. Kate Osamor
  169. Albert Owen
  170. Stephanie Peacock
  171. Teresa Pearce
  172. Matthew Pennycook
  173. Toby Perkins
  174. Jess Phillips
  175. Bridget Phillipson
  176. Laura Pidcock
  177. Jo Platt
  178. Luke Pollard
  179. Stephen Pound
  180. Lucy Powell
  181. Yasmin Qureshi
  182. Faisal Rashid
  183. Angela Rayner
  184. Steve Reed
  185. Christina Rees
  186. Ellie Reeves
  187. Rachel Reeves
  188. Emma Reynolds
  189. Jonathan Reynolds
  190. Marie Rimmer
  191. Geoffrey Robinson
  192. Matt Rodda
  193. Danielle Rowley
  194. Chris Ruane
  195. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
  196. Joan Ryan
  197. Naz Shah
  198. Virendra Sharma
  199. Barry Sheerman
  200. Paula Sherriff
  201. Gavin Shuker
  202. Tulip Siddiq (Proxy vote cast by Vicky Foxcroft)
  203. Dennis Skinner
  204. Andy Slaughter
  205. Ruth Smeeth
  206. Angela Smith
  207. Cat Smith
  208. Eleanor Smith
  209. Jeff Smith (Teller)
  210. Laura Smith
  211. Nick Smith
  212. Owen Smith
  213. Karin Smyth
  214. Gareth Snell
  215. Alex Sobel
  216. John Spellar
  217. Keir Starmer
  218. Jo Stevens
  219. Wes Streeting
  220. Graham Stringer
  221. Paul Sweeney
  222. Mark Tami
  223. Gareth Thomas
  224. Nick Thomas-Symonds
  225. Emily Thornberry
  226. Stephen Timms
  227. Jon Trickett
  228. Anna Turley
  229. Karl Turner
  230. Derek Twigg
  231. Stephen Twigg
  232. Liz Twist
  233. Chuka Umunna
  234. Keith Vaz
  235. Valerie Vaz
  236. Thelma Walker
  237. Tom Watson
  238. Catherine West
  239. Matt Western
  240. Alan Whitehead
  241. Martin Whitfield
  242. Paul Williams
  243. Chris Williamson
  244. Phil Wilson
  245. Mohammad Yasin
  246. Daniel Zeichner

Liberal Democrat

  1. Tom Brake
  2. Vince Cable
  3. Alistair Carmichael
  4. Ed Davey
  5. Tim Farron
  6. Wera Hobhouse
  7. Christine Jardine
  8. Norman Lamb
  9. Layla Moran
  10. Jamie Stone
  11. Jo Swinson

Plaid Cymru

  1. Jonathan Edwards
  2. Ben Lake
  3. Liz Saville Roberts
  4. Hywel Williams

SNP

  1. Hannah Bardell
  2. Mhairi Black
  3. Ian Blackford
  4. Kirsty Blackman
  5. Deidre Brock
  6. Alan Brown
  7. Lisa Cameron
  8. Doug Chapman
  9. Joanna Cherry
  10. Ronnie Cowan
  11. Angela Crawley
  12. Martyn Day
  13. Martin Docherty-Hughes
  14. Marion Fellows
  15. Stephen Gethins
  16. Patricia Gibson
  17. Patrick Grady
  18. Peter Grant
  19. Neil Gray
  20. Drew Hendry
  21. Stewart Hosie
  22. Chris Law
  23. David Linden
  24. Angus MacNeil
  25. Stewart McDonald
  26. Stuart McDonald
  27. John McNally
  28. Carol Monaghan
  29. Gavin Newlands
  30. Brendan O’Hara
  31. Tommy Sheppard
  32. Chris Stephens
  33. Alison Thewliss
  34. Philippa Whitford
  35. Pete Wishart

THE 73 MPs WHO DID NOT VOTE IN THE DIVISION*

========

Conservative

  1. Heidi Allen
  2. David Amess
  3. Richard Bacon
  4. Steve Baker
  5. Guto Bebb
  6. Crispin Blunt
  7. Suella Braverman
  8. Andrew Bridgen
  9. Conor Burns
  10. William Cash
  11. Rehman Chishti
  12. Kenneth Clarke
  13. Simon Clarke
  14. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown
  15. Philip Davies
  16. Nadine Dorries
  17. Richard Drax
  18. James Duddridge
  19. Iain Duncan Smith
  20. Charlie Elphicke
  21. Michael Fabricant
  22. Mark Francois
  23. Marcus Fysh
  24. James Gray
  25. Chris Green
  26. Justine Greening
  27. Dominic Grieve
  28. Sam Gyimah
  29. Mark Harper
  30. Adam Holloway
  31. Ranil Jayawardena
  32. Bernard Jenkin
  33. Andrea Jenkyns
  34. Boris Johnson
  35. Jo Johnson
  36. David Jones
  37. Pauline Latham
  38. Phillip Lee
  39. Andrew Lewer
  40. Julian Lewis
  41. Julia Lopez
  42. Jonathan Lord
  43. Tim Loughton
  44. Craig Mackinlay
  45. Esther McVey
  46. Sheryll Murray
  47. Matthew Offord
  48. Priti Patel
  49. Owen Paterson
  50. Dominic Raab
  51. John Redwood
  52. Jacob Rees-Mogg
  53. Laurence Robertson
  54. Andrew Rosindell
  55. Douglas Ross
  56. Lee Rowley
  57. Antoinette Sandbach
  58. Grant Shapps
  59. Henry Smith
  60. Anna Soubry
  61. Bob Stewart
  62. Ross Thomson
  63. Anne-Marie Trevelyan
  64. Shailesh Vara
  65. Theresa Villiers
  66. John Whittingdale

Independent

  1. Kelvin Hopkins
  2. Ivan Lewis
  3. Fiona Onasanya (in prison)

Labour

  1. Chris Bryant
  2. Caroline Flint
  3. Paul Flynn
  4. Kate Hoey

*Not including the Speaker, John Bercow, and his three deputies (Lindsay Hoyle, Eleanor Laing and Rosie Winterton) who, by convention, do not vote in Commons divisions and the Sinn Fein MPs who have not taken their seats.  NB: Absence from the division may be for a number of reasons, such as being ill, on maternity leave or on parliamentary business elsewhere, as well as a deliberate abstention. Paul Flynn is known to be extremely ill and Fiona Onasanya is currently in prison.

THE 261 MPs WHO SUPPORTED THE MOTION

===========

 

Conservative

  1. Nigel Adams
  2. Bim Afolami
  3. Adam Afriyie
  4. Peter Aldous
  5. Lucy Allan
  6. Stuart Andrew
  7. Edward Argar
  8. Victoria Atkins
  9. Kemi Badenoch
  10. Harriett Baldwin
  11. Steve Barclay
  12. John Baron
  13. Henry Bellingham
  14. Richard Benyon
  15. Paul Beresford
  16. Jake Berry
  17. Bob Blackman
  18. Nick Boles
  19. Peter Bottomley
  20. Andrew Bowie
  21. Ben Bradley
  22. Karen Bradley
  23. Graham Brady
  24. Jack Brereton
  25. Steve Brine
  26. James Brokenshire
  27. Fiona Bruce
  28. Robert Buckland
  29. Alex Burghart
  30. Alistair Burt
  31. Alun Cairns
  32. James Cartlidge
  33. Maria Caulfield
  34. Alex Chalk
  35. Jo Churchill (Teller)
  36. Colin Clark
  37. Greg Clark
  38. James Cleverly
  39. Thérèse Coffey
  40. Damian Collins
  41. Alberto Costa
  42. Robert Courts
  43. Geoffrey Cox
  44. Stephen Crabb
  45. Tracey Crouch
  46. Chris Davies
  47. David Davies
  48. Glyn Davies
  49. Mims Davies
  50. David Davis
  51. Caroline Dinenage
  52. Jonathan Djanogly
  53. Leo Docherty
  54. Michelle Donelan
  55. Steve Double
  56. Oliver Dowden
  57. Jackie Doyle-Price
  58. David Duguid
  59. Alan Duncan
  60. Philip Dunne
  61. Michael Ellis
  62. Tobias Ellwood
  63. George Eustice
  64. Nigel Evans
  65. David Evennett
  66. Michael Fallon
  67. Mark Field
  68. Vicky Ford
  69. Kevin Foster
  70. Liam Fox
  71. Lucy Frazer
  72. George Freeman
  73. Mike Freer
  74. Roger Gale
  75. Mark Garnier
  76. David Gauke
  77. Nusrat Ghani
  78. Nick Gibb
  79. Cheryl Gillan
  80. John Glen
  81. Zac Goldsmith
  82. Robert Goodwill
  83. Michael Gove
  84. Luke Graham
  85. Richard Graham
  86. Bill Grant
  87. Helen Grant
  88. Chris Grayling
  89. Damian Green
  90. Andrew Griffiths
  91. Kirstene Hair
  92. Robert Halfon
  93. Luke Hall
  94. Philip Hammond
  95. Stephen Hammond
  96. Matt Hancock
  97. Greg Hands
  98. Richard Harrington
  99. Rebecca Harris
  100. Trudy Harrison
  101. Simon Hart
  102. John Hayes
  103. Oliver Heald
  104. James Heappey
  105. Chris Heaton-Harris
  106. Peter Heaton-Jones
  107. Gordon Henderson
  108. Nick Herbert
  109. Damian Hinds
  110. Simon Hoare
  111. George Hollingbery
  112. Kevin Hollinrake
  113. John Howell
  114. Nigel Huddleston
  115. Eddie Hughes
  116. Jeremy Hunt
  117. Nick Hurd
  118. Alister Jack
  119. Margot James
  120. Sajid Javid
  121. Robert Jenrick
  122. Caroline Johnson
  123. Gareth Johnson
  124. Andrew Jones
  125. Marcus Jones
  126. Daniel Kawczynski
  127. Gillian Keegan
  128. Seema Kennedy
  129. Stephen Kerr
  130. Greg Knight
  131. Julian Knight
  132. Kwasi Kwarteng
  133. John Lamont
  134. Mark Lancaster
  135. Andrea Leadsom
  136. Jeremy Lefroy
  137. Edward Leigh
  138. Oliver Letwin
  139. Brandon Lewis
  140. Ian Liddell-Grainger
  141. David Lidington
  142. Jack Lopresti
  143. Rachel Maclean
  144. Anne Main
  145. Alan Mak
  146. Kit Malthouse
  147. Scott Mann
  148. Paul Masterson
  149. Theresa May
  150. Paul Maynard (Teller)
  151. Patrick McLoughlin
  152. Stephen McPartland
  153. Mark Menzies
  154. Johnny Mercer
  155. Huw Merriman
  156. Stephen Metcalfe
  157. Maria Miller
  158. Amanda Milling
  159. Nigel Mills
  160. Anne Milton
  161. Andrew Mitchell
  162. Damien Moore
  163. Penny Mordaunt
  164. Nicky Morgan
  165. David Morris
  166. James Morris
  167. Wendy Morton
  168. David Mundell
  169. Andrew Murrison
  170. Bob Neill
  171. Sarah Newton
  172. Caroline Nokes
  173. Jesse Norman
  174. Neil O’Brien
  175. Guy Opperman
  176. Neil Parish
  177. Mark Pawsey
  178. Mike Penning
  179. John Penrose
  180. Andrew Percy
  181. Claire Perry
  182. Chris Philp
  183. Christopher Pincher
  184. Daniel Poulter
  185. Rebecca Pow
  186. Victoria Prentis
  187. Mark Prisk
  188. Mark Pritchard
  189. Tom Pursglove
  190. Jeremy Quin
  191. Will Quince
  192. Mary Robinson
  193. Amber Rudd
  194. David Rutley
  195. Paul Scully
  196. Bob Seely
  197. Andrew Selous
  198. Alok Sharma
  199. Alec Shelbrooke
  200. Keith Simpson
  201. Chris Skidmore
  202. Chloe Smith
  203. Julian Smith
  204. Royston Smith
  205. Nicholas Soames
  206. Caroline Spelman
  207. Mark Spencer
  208. Andrew Stephenson
  209. John Stevenson
  210. Iain Stewart
  211. Rory Stewart
  212. Gary Streeter
  213. Mel Stride
  214. Graham Stuart
  215. Julian Sturdy
  216. Rishi Sunak
  217. Desmond Swayne
  218. Hugo Swire
  219. Robert Syms
  220. Derek Thomas
  221. Maggie Throup
  222. Kelly Tolhurst
  223. Justin Tomlinson
  224. Michael Tomlinson
  225. Craig Tracey
  226. David Tredinnick
  227. Elizabeth Truss
  228. Thomas Tugendhat
  229. Edward Vaizey
  230. Martin Vickers
  231. Charles Walker
  232. Robin Walker
  233. Ben Wallace
  234. David Warburton
  235. Matt Warman
  236. Giles Watling
  237. Helen Whately
  238. Heather Wheeler
  239. Craig Whittaker
  240. Bill Wiggin
  241. Gavin Williamson
  242. Mike Wood
  243. William Wragg
  244. Jeremy Wright
  245. Nadhim Zahawi

DUP

  1. Gregory Campbell
  2. Nigel Dodds
  3. Jeffrey Donaldson
  4. Paul Girvan
  5. Emma Little Pengelly
  6. Ian Paisley
  7. Gavin Robinson
  8. Jim Shannon
  9. David Simpson
  10. Sammy Wilson

Independent

  1. Frank Field
  2. Stephen Lloyd

Labour

  1. Ian Austin
  2. Kevin Barron
  3. Jim Fitzpatrick
  4. John Mann

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Row brewing over Thursday’s Government motion opposing a no-deal Brexit

A big row is brewing this morning over the motion that the Government has tabled for tomorrow’s full day of debate on Brexit in the Commons, which the eurosceptic MPs in the European Research Group have told government whips they cannot support. With MPs having expected a neutral, anodyne (albeit amendable) motion to be tabled, […]

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A big row is brewing this morning over the motion that the Government has tabled for tomorrow’s full day of debate on Brexit in the Commons, which the eurosceptic MPs in the European Research Group have told government whips they cannot support.

With MPs having expected a neutral, anodyne (albeit amendable) motion to be tabled, instead the Government yesterday tabled a motion that endorses the approach to Brexit as agreed by amendments passed by the Commons on 29th January.

Whilst welcoming Theresa May’s statement delivered in the Commons yesterday and noting that “discussions between the UK and the EU on the Northern Ireland backstop are ongoing”, the motion states that the House:

“reiterates its support for the approach to leaving the EU expressed by this House on 29 January 2019”

Far from being neutral, this means that MPs are being called upon to back a motion that would not only be endorsing the demand of Sir Graham Brady’s amendment for the backstop to be replaced, but also the other successful amendment of two weeks ago – from Dame Caroline Spelman – that states opposition to leaving the EU without a deal.

I gather that there was a fiery meeting in the Government Whips’ Office yesterday involving leading lights of the ERG during which the Tory eurosceptics indicated that they could not support a motion that ruled out the prospect of a no-deal Brexit. The ERG suggested that it be pulled and a new version tabled today. But the government whips did not acquiesce to their entreaties and ministers therefore face the prospect of potentially losing the vote tomorrow if they refuse to table an alternative motion and Labour and other opposition parties then whip their MPs to oppose the motion as currently tabled.

While the motion would not be legally binding, its being voted down on Valentine’s Day would create embarrassing and unnecessary “Government defeated again on Brexit” headlines, spoiling the peace, love and unity that had broken out on the government benches over the successful Brady amendment last month.

A senior ERG source tells me:

“This is clearly not a neutral motion, as it effectively endorses the Spelman amendment – which ruled out No Deal – which is explicitly contrary to the Government’s own policy and which would completely destroy our leverage in the critical negotiations with the EU. If they supported this motion on Thursday, the Government would effectively be voting against their own expressed policy, as repeated in the House, including by the Prime Minister, on numerous occasions. This is utterly chaotic, bordering on farce.

“We told the Government very clearly last night that we will not support this motion and in fact we urged them, indeed pleaded with them at senior level, to withdraw it yesterday – but they took absolutely no notice. Frankly, we despair.”

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Donald Tusk not only unfairly attacked Brexiteers yesterday, but reminded us the EU is anti-democratic

What an extraordinary day it was in Brussels yesterday. Leading most of the papers today are the incendiary remarks made by European Council President Donald Tusk yesterday at a press conference alongside Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar. At the end of a relatively short statement, Tusk opined: “By the way, I’ve been wondering what that special […]

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What an extraordinary day it was in Brussels yesterday. Leading most of the papers today are the incendiary remarks made by European Council President Donald Tusk yesterday at a press conference alongside Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar. At the end of a relatively short statement, Tusk opined:

“By the way, I’ve been wondering what that special place in hell looks like, for those who promoted Brexit, without even a sketch of a plan how to carry it out safely.”

Never mind the deeply undiplomatic nature of the comment which unsurprisingly drew much criticism, it was also totally untrue.

While David Cameron and George Osborne may have irresponsibly refused to allow the civil service to prepare for the eventuality of a Leave vote in advance of the referendum, plans were drawn up by others. As Dr Lee Rotherham reminded us here on BrexitCentral in 2016, there was Change, or go – the seminal publication from Business for Britain which ran to more than 1,000 pages. Its subtitle, “How Britain would gain influence and prosper outside an unreformed EU”, provides the clue to it being exactly what Tusk claims did not exist.

Or there was the 2014 publication, Cutting the Gordian knot: A road map for British exit from the European Union, written by Rory Broomfield and Iain Murray. There were many others too.

There’s no way that this was an off the cuff intervention from Tusk. It was clearly planned. If you watch him making the remarks on our video, you can see him referring to written notes while he said it. And he then happily tweeted the words out afterwards – prompting an equally inappropriate response from MEP Guy Verhofstadt.

And then to rub salt into the wound, at the end of the press conference, Varadkar is caught saying: “They’ll give you terrible trouble in the British press for that”, to which Tusk replies: “Yes, I know” and laughs.

What on earth was he thinking???

Moreover, many of us had already been offended by some of the earlier contents of Tusk’s short statement. Aside from the contradiction of declaring the Withdrawal Agreement “not open for re-negotiation” while demanding that Theresa May offer a “suggestion on how to end the impasse”, the former Polish Prime Minister also reminded us of the EU’s arrogant attitude to referendums which deliver the “wrong” answer.

Having claimed that “a very great number of people in the UK… wish for a reversal of this decision” to leave the EU, he lamented:

“The pro-Brexit stance of the UK Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition rules out this question… Today, there is no political force and no effective leadership for Remain”.

Some might say that the definitive result of the 2016 referendum rules out a reversal of the said decision. Call me old-fashioned, but when a parliament organises a referendum to ask the people a question, is it not duty bound to implement the answer it is given?

But of course, that’s not the EU’s way of doing things. When Denmark rejected the Maastricht Treaty in a 1992 referendum, they had to vote again in order to approve it. It was the same with Ireland and their Nice Treaty referendum in 2001. And when the French and Dutch electorates rejected the European Constitution in 2005, it was merely cosmetically repackaged as the Lisbon Treaty. And when the Irish rejected that in 2008, they had to vote again in order to give Brussels the answer it required.

All a salutary reminder that the EU is not so much undemocratic as anti-democratic.

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How MPs voted on the Brexit Amendments

MPs are voting on a series of amendments to a procedural motion from the Government allowing MPs to make their views know as to how the Government should now proceed in the wake of the draft Withdrawal Agreement having been voted down earlier in the month. Here are the amendments, what they would do/would have […]

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MPs are voting on a series of amendments to a procedural motion from the Government allowing MPs to make their views know as to how the Government should now proceed in the wake of the draft Withdrawal Agreement having been voted down earlier in the month.

Here are the amendments, what they would do/would have done and how MPs voted on each of them:

Official Labour Amendment tabled by Jeremy Corbyn 

Purpose: To secure sufficient time for Parliament to consider and vote on options to prevent a no-deal Brexit and that those options should include: (i) Negotiating changes to the deal so as to secure “a permanent customs union with the EU, a strong relationship with the single market underpinned by shared institutions and obligations, and dynamic alignment on rights and standards” in order to command a majority in the House of Commons; and (ii) Legislating to “hold a public vote on a deal or a proposition that has commanded the support of the majority of the House of Commons”.

Result: Defeated by 327 votes to 296 (majority: 31)

======================================================

Official SNP Amendment tabled by Ian Blackford 

Purpose: To call on the Government to seek an extension of the Article 50 period, rule out a no-deal Brexit and assert that “the people of Scotland should not
be taken out of the EU against their will”.

Result: Defeated by 327 votes to 39 (majority: 288)

======================================================

Amendment tabled by Dominic Grieve

Purpose: To override long-standing Commons Standing Orders and dictate that there will be six and half hours of debate on Brexit in the Commons on the six successive sitting Tuesdays beginning on 12th February on motions that will be amendable.

Result: Defeated by 321 votes to 301 (majority: 20)

======================================================

Amendment tabled by Yvette Cooper (backed by the Labour frontbench)

Purpose: To override long-standing Commons Standing Orders and dictate that next Tuesday’s Commons business will be proceedings on Yvette Cooper’s  European Union (Withdrawal) (No 3) Bill which would direct the Prime Minister to seek an extension of the Article 50 period until 31st December 2019.

Result: Pending

======================================================

Amendment tabled by Rachel Reeves

Purpose: To require the Prime Minister to seek an extension of the Article 50 period if a Brexit deal has not been agreed by the House of Commons by 26th February.

Result: Pending

======================================================

Amendment tabled by Dame Caroline Spelman

Purpose: To reject the UK leaving the European Union “without a Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship”.

Result: Pending

======================================================

Amendment tabled by Sir Graham Brady (backed by the Government)

Purpose: To require that the Northern Ireland backstop be “replaced with alternative arrangements to avoid a hard border” while supporting the notion of leaving the EU with a deal and therefore supporting the Withdrawal Agreement subject to this change.

Result: Pending

======================================================

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‘Malthouse Compromise’ wins DUP backing and support from trade experts

Late last night it emerged that MPs representing a broad cross-section of Tory opinion on Brexit had been working together on a new plan behind which Leavers and Remainers could unite. The so-called Malthouse Compromise – named after Brexit-backing minister Kit Malthouse who helped broker the discussions that brought the parties together – would provide […]

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Late last night it emerged that MPs representing a broad cross-section of Tory opinion on Brexit had been working together on a new plan behind which Leavers and Remainers could unite.

The so-called Malthouse Compromise – named after Brexit-backing minister Kit Malthouse who helped broker the discussions that brought the parties together – would provide for “exit from the EU on time with a new backstop, which would be acceptable indefinitely, but which incentivises us all to reach a new future relationship”.

Also reportedly involved in the talks that brought about the proposals were European Research Group stalwarts Jacob Rees-Mogg and Steve Baker, Remain-backing ministers Stephen Hammond and Robert Buckland, as well as Treasury Committee Chair and former Cabinet Minister Nicky Morgan.

The plan would extend the transition period by a year to December 2021, which would “allow both parties to prepare properly for WTO terms, but also provide a period in which the parties could obviate this outcome by negotiating a mutually beneficial future relationship”.

A summary of the proposals is circulating, which explains it as follows: 

Plan A – Revise negotiated Withdrawal Agreement and Framework

Outline:

  • Immediately table legal text to amend the Withdrawal Agreement to replace the backstop with an acceptable indefinite solution set
    out in A Better Deal, 12 Dec 2019
  • Maintain our offer on the rights of EU citizens in the UK, the agreed financial settlement, and the proposed Implementation Period
    (IP) until no later than Dec 2021, or sooner on conclusion of the Future Relationship (FR)
  • Require that, at the end of the IP or sooner, the UK shall negotiate fisheries access as an independent coastal state, under UNCLOS

Advantages

  • Rescues the Withdrawal Agreement
  • Maximises leverage plus secure a transition period
  • No backstop dangers: the new protocol is permanent, a “frontstop” and should be objectively acceptable to all.

Disadvantages

  • Uncertainty continues until the FR is ratified
  • Difficulty of persuading Eurosceptics to swallow:
  • – £39bn payment
  • – Saving the effect of the ECA during the IP
  • – Additional EU citizens’ rights
  •  – Other WA problems (DSC, CCP vs WTO)

Plan B – Basic transition agreement=====================

Outline:

  • Continue to offer legal text for Plan A and bilateral cooperation in areas of mutual interest, including security, in a spirit of goodwill
    and cooperation
  • Unilaterally guarantee EU citizens’ rights
  • Uphold current standards, pending a comprehensive FR
  • Offer to pay our net contribution (c.£10bn pa) in exchange for the Implementation Period as negotiated, until no later than Dec 2021
  • Require that, at the end of the IP or sooner, the UK shall negotiate fisheries access as an independent coastal state, under UNCLOS
  • Work to agree an interim GATT XXIV compliant trading arrangement, pending a comprehensive FR
  • Revise our financial offer to the minimum compatible with our public law international obligations and submit to arbitration

Advantages

  • Offers a standstill to 2021 to enable negotiations
  • Preserves optionality
  • Secures time
  • Secures exit

Disadvantages

  • Risks EU conditions, legislation, extension
  • No Withdrawal Agreement
  • Eurosceptic concern about:
  • – Structure of standstill, esp saving ECA effect
  • – Money

The DUP have been swift to endorse the Malthouse proposals, with party leader Arlene Foster issuing a statement to formally endorse the plan:

“We believe it can unify a number of strands in the Brexit debate including the views of remainers and leavers. It also gives a feasible alternative to the backstop proposed by the European Union which would split the United Kingdom or keep the entire United Kingdom in the Customs Union and Single Market. Importantly, this proposal would also offer a route towards negotiating a future trade relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union.

“If the Prime Minister is seeking to find a united front, both between elements in her own party and the DUP, in the negotiations which she will enter with the European Union, then this is a proposition which she should not turn her back on. There is no better time to advance this alternative given the confusion and disarray which is now manifesting itself in Brussels. This has been displayed both by the contradictory EU statements and the panic stricken behaviour of the Irish government.”

Steve Baker has also released a letter in support of the Better Deal plan from a range of international trade experts, which reads as follows:

Dear Steve,

You have asked for our views as trade policy experts as to the proposal of a Better Deal as an acceptable Withdrawal Agreement that would allow the UK to proceed to the next stage of negotiations, and that would not, in our view take an independent trade and regulatory policy off the table, and would allow, if the UK so chose a clear and negotiable pathway to a comprehensive and advanced free trade agreement such as proposed in Plan A Plus.

We can confirm that in our view the UK would be best served by putting an offer like a Better Deal on the table, and allow the process of pressure and compression at the back end of the negotiations to start to take effect. We would anticipate that the UK will see datapoints emerge from the EU in the course of the next month, such as EU member state agricultural producers express concern about the possibility of no deal, especially Irish beef farmers, Bavarian dairy farmers, and French farmers. We would anticipate member states start to weaken in their unity vis-à-vis each other and the Commission. We have already seen signs of this from Germany, Poland, and from French farmers and fishermen. It is imperative that the UK keeps the pressure on (seeking an extension of Article 50 at the end of February per the Cooper-Boles amendment would be a fatal mistake as it would take the pressure off the EU just as it would otherwise be building). In addition, there is value to putting this facilitated approach on the table as if there is to be an FTA in the future, it will require discussion and evaluation now. It is better to get the EU used to UK ideas on this point, and to put some specifics behind Michel Barnier’s recent pronouncement that, in the event of no deal, alternative arrangements would have to be found for the Irish border. Furthermore, during this period, it would be important for the UK to line up its allies, especially those who run global supply chains through the UK and EU-27 such as the US, Japan, and Korea to name three in support of its reasonable proposals, thus increasing the pressure and compression on the EU.

In our view the current deal gives all the negotiating leverage to the EU during the negotiating phase and makes the path to an advanced FTA such as we have proposed in Plan A Plus extremely difficult. If comfort could be given that such an un-occluded path exists, then support might be brought to bear on all sides for an agreement allowing the transition period to be retained.

Yours sincerely,

Peter Allgeier, Former Deputy USTR and Former US Ambassador to the WTO
Eduardo Perez-Motta, Former Mexican Ambassador to the WTO and Former Chairman of the Mexican Competition Commission
Alan Oxley, former Chairman of GATT Council, Former Australian Ambassador to the WTO, founder of the Cairns Group
Lockwood Smith, former Trade Minister of New Zealand
Shanker Singham, former cleared advisor to US government, Mitt Romney Presidential Campaigns of 2008 and 2012, and formerhead of Squire Patton Boggs Market Access/WTO practice
Hans Maessen, Customs specialist, SGS Corporation, and representative of CLECAT, European Association of Customs Professionals
U. Srinivasa Rangan, Professor of International Business, Babson College, US

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