These are the fastest selling used cars in the UK

Used car marketplace Auto Trader has revealed the fastest selling second-hand cars in the UK, in new data released today.

The Auto Trader Fastest Selling Index takes into account market supply and demand and identifies the models of car that have the potential to leave forecourts fastest – as well as those likely to take the longest to sell.

Powered by the Auto Trader Retail Rating metric, the Index is based on analysis of over 1.9 million vehicles each day, including 90,000 vehicle updates and an average of 19,000 vehicles added or removed from Auto Trader.

Coupled with data from around 450,000 daily trade used car listings plus additional dealer forecourt and website data, Auto Trader say it offers the most accurate and immediate view of the fast-moving market.

What kind of car sells fastest in the UK?

As of 16th September, the Index revealed that, if priced appropriately, MPVs and 4x4s have the potential to sell faster than their smaller counterparts.

Seven is clearly the magic number with the top three cars in the Autotrader list seven-seater models.

The 2016 Seat Alhambra is the quickest-selling used car in the UK
The 2016 Seat Alhambra is the quickest-selling used car in the UK

For the second consecutive month, the 2016 SEAT Alhambra (diesel, automatic) is the UK’s fastest selling used car, with the potential to sell in an average of just 23 days when priced to the live retail market. The Alhambra is joined in the top three by its seven-seater stable mate the Volkswagen Sharan, with the 2017 and 2016 models ranked second and third – something Autotrader say is a sure sign the school run is influencing purchase decisions.

The slowest car to sell is another Volkswagen Group model, the 2019 electric Volkswagen Golf, which Autotrader predict will take 150 days to sell.

The top 10 fastest selling cars in Britain

Rank Make / model Fuel & transmission Auto Trader Retail Rating Predicted days to sell
1 2016 SEAT Alhambra Diesel – Automatic 99.98 23
2 2017 Volkswagen Sharan Diesel – Automatic 99.93 25
3 2016 Volkswagen Sharan Diesel – Automatic 99.49 26
4 2016 Renault Zoe Electric – Automatic 99.52 27
5 2016 Ford Grand C-Max Diesel – Automatic 99.52 27
6 2015 Dacia Sandero Stepway Petrol – Manual 99.55 29
7 2016 Land Rover Discovery Sport Diesel – Automatic 99.51 29
8 2018 Citroen Grand C4 Picasso Diesel – Automatic 99.45 30
9 2015 Volkswagen Polo Petrol – Manual 99.65 31
10 2017 Volkswagen Touareg Diesel – Automatic 99.43 33

The top 10 slowest selling cars in Britain

Rank Make / model Fuel & transmission Auto Trader Retail Rating Predicted days to sell
1 2019 Volkswagen Golf Electric – Automatic 1.74 150
2 2018 Citroen C4 Picasso Petrol – Manual 1.84 150
3 2019 Audi Q2 Diesel – Manual 2.00 150
4 2019 Nissan Micra Diesel – Manual 2.07 150
5 2019 Citroen C4 Cactus Diesel – Automatic 2.12 150
6 2019 SsangYong Tivoli Diesel – Manual 1.87 149
7 2019 SsangYong Tivoli Diesel – Automatic 1.96 146
8 2019 Jeep Compass Manual – Automatic 2.17 146
9 2019 Peugeot 508 Diesel – Manual 1.66 143
10 2019 Audi A5 Diesel – Automatic 2.00 143

Read more:

How to sell your car privately

How to get the best deal when selling your car

Four things to consider when buying a used car

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2019 Kia Proceed review – a ‘brake’ from the norm

With a back end that bears more than a passing resemblance to a Porsche Panamera, the Proceed shooting brake is a sign Kia is putting the boxy, cheap-looking designs of a decade ago behind its.

The last Ceed and Proceed models were big sellers for the Korean manufacturer and there’s enough belief in the brand that as well as the more traditional Ceed estate, Ceed five-door hatchback and the now industry standard crossover-styled version – the XCeed – the attractive shooting brake version got the nod from execs as well.

Our GT-Line test car, with two-tone cloth and synthetic leather seats, synthetic leather steering wheel, and a long list of driver assistance, active and passive safety features and comfort tech is an impressively high-end feeling package at a mid-market price point. A similarly priced Ford Focus, still the class leader in sales at the time of writing, will have a significantly shorter list of standard equipment unless you start pushing the price up by hammering the options list.

And unlike the latest Focus, the Proceed boasts independent multi-link suspension across the range, rather than just on higher specification models. The ride is firm and at higher speeds this translates to a controlled and sporty feel. Compared with the standard Ceed model the Proceed has stiffer springs and it has been lowered by 5mm.

2019 Kia Proceed profile
There’s a hint of Porsche Panamera about the Proceed’s lines (Photo: Kia)

Kia Proceed GT-Line

Price: £24,690
Engine: 1.6-litre, four-cylinder, diesel
Power: 134bhp
Torque: 178lb/ft
Transmission: Six-speed manual
Top speed: 124mph
0-60mph: 10 seconds
Economy: 56.5mpg
CO2 emissions: 114g/km

Around town, predictably, that sportier set up means that it can feel a little rough and ready over broken potholes and patched up cobbles but in terms of driver comfort that’s more than offset by some rather comfortable seats – although my view on these may be skewed favourably due to the fact I had been squeezing myself into a Fiesta ST with seats designed by a complete sadist prior to picking up the Kia.

2019 Kia Proceed interior
Generous equipment and solid build quality are a given in modern Kias (Photo: Kia)

Despite the sporty appearance and handling, the engine powering our test car is a fairly conservative 134bhp diesel offering. The 1.6 turbo powerplant in the GT model looks a tastier proposition. With a 10-second nought to 60 time our diesel demonstrator felt far from quick, which was a shame, although if you ditch the six-speed manual for the seven-speed DSG you can shave a couple of milliseconds from that time.

The car didn’t feel underpowered as such, it handled the motorway comfortably and around the town it felt sprightly enough but the engine failed to fan the flames of desire so artfully kindled by the faux Porsche aesthetic.

2019 Kia Proceed boot
The Proceed’s boot is bigger than the hatchback Ceed’s but smaller than the standard estate’s (Photo: Kia)

What it did do was deliver some impressive fuel economy figures. Over the course of a week-long test packed with city drives and longer, cross-country cruises I saw an average figure of 54mpg (not far off the listed figure of 56) and barely drained half of the fuel tank.

With a comfortable cabin, a big list of standard equipment and strong economy, the Proceed could be a popular option for business drivers and anyone with a long commute. Families might prefer the extra space afforded by the traditional estate car but, if you don’t need to haul loads of luggage, the Proceed is the pick of the Ceed line up.

2019 Kia Proceed rear view
The diesel Proceed is an economical mile-muncher (Photo: Kia)

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2019 Ford Focus Buyer’s guide: reviews, model specs and how much each 2019 Ford Focus costs

The Ford Focus has been a top seller in the UK since it was first launched as the eventual successor to the Ford Escort in 1998.

Four generations and multiple face-lifts on and the latest model, launched in 2018, is back duking it out with the VW Golf for the mantle of top-selling C-Segment car and currently lags behind only the Fiesta in the sales tables year to date.

The latest generation has been praised for its handling and levels of driver assistance tech as well as its spacious interior and engine range.

But as with any car, the devil is in the details and getting the combination of engine, gearbox and trim level can make all the difference.

Here’s what you need to know about the current generation of Ford Focus.

Not all suspension is created equal

For the first time in a Focus model, Ford are offering completely different suspension architecture depending on which model in the line-up you buy (or specifically which engine powers that model).

This isn’t uncommon, other manufacturers do the same thing, and different doesn’t necessarily mean bad. It does mean that when you read a review of the Focus that hails its class-leading handling however, you’ll want to be sure that the reviewer is talking about the Focus you are considering buying and not one with a different set-up.

Cars powered by the smaller 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol, or the 1.5-litre EcoBlue diesel, engines, have a relatively old-school twist-beam suspension set-up with ‘force-vectoring springs’ to add stiffness.The larger 1.5-litre petrol, or the 2.0-litre diesel, engines get the higher-tech multi-link set-up.

Estate models get a bespoke version of the multi-link suspension with repositioned dampers to accommodate the larger boot while suspension on the ST, ST-line and ST-line X models is lowered regardless of the engine under the bonnet.

Have there been any recall notices on the new generation Focus?

Car manufacturers issue hundreds of safety recall notices every year and owners of cars will be notified of any recalls that affect them.

By law, motor dealers must address any safety recalls affecting a model free of charge before selling it – but that law doesn’t affect private sellers.

These are the recalls issued so far for the new generation Ford Focus: 

The 2019 Ford Focus

Ford Focus trim levels and engine line-up

Style

This is the entry-level trim level on the Focus. It’s the only trim in the line-up that comes with steel wheels as standard instead of alloys and also misses out on the centre arm-rest, the  8-inch touch-screen display and Android Auto/Apple Car Play. It does come with A/C as standard as well as Bluetooth, DAB and USB connectivity.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (85/100/125)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (95/120)

Standard Equipment:

Key exterior features

  • 16″ 5-spoke “Design” steel wheel
  • Halogen headlights with LED daytime running lights
  • Auto-headlamps (on/off)
  • Body coloured electrically-operated and heated door mirrors with side indicators
  • Body coloured bumpers, front upper grille with chrome surround and painted bars
  • Mini spare wheel
  • Ford Easy Fuel capless refuelling system
  • Black roof rails (estate only)

Key interior features

  • Ford DAB Radio with 4.2″ TFT colour display, 6 speakers, USB connectivity port with iPod® functionality, Bluetooth®, remote audio controls, voice pass through, Emergency Assistance*
  • Manual air conditioning
  • Pre-Collision Assist with Autonomous Emergency Braking and pedestrian/cyclist detection
  • Lane-Keeping Aid with Lane-Departure Warning
  • Post-collision braking
  • Intelligent Speed Assist
  • Electric parking brake
  • Selectable drive mode
  • Remote central locking and engine immobiliser
  • Electrically-operated front and rear windows

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £18,545 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £22,895 for the 1.5L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

Zetec

Back when the Focus was first launched Zetec would have been one of the higher-end trim levels, sports focused alongside the more luxurious Ghia models (remember those?). Now it’s been relegated to lower-mid-range with Titanium, Titanium X, Vignale as well as sporty ST-Line and ST-Line X all sitting above it in the tree – and that’s before you get to the performance line-up and Active range.

Humble as it may be in the scheme of things, equipment levels are much more generous compared with Style. 16-inch alloy wheels, an arm rest and some leather trim inside are highlights but the biggest improvement is the addition of the 8-inch touch-screen interface which brings with it Apple Car Play and Android Auto.

Important things lacking in the standard equipment list would be Satellite Navigation and parking sensors.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (100/125)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (95/120)

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features, in addition to Style

  • 16″ 5×2-spoke alloy wheels in ‘Sparkle Silver’ finish
  • Bright upper door frame mouldings (5-door)
  • Bright lower door frame mouldings (estate)
  • Front fog laps with cornering function
  • Bright roof rails (estate only)

Key interior features, in addition to Style

  • Ford SYNC with 8” TFT touchscreen & App Link Android Auto/Apple CarPlay
  • Sports style front seats
  • Centre console with armrest
  • 3-spoke leather-trimmed steering wheel with integrated audio controls
  • Leather-trimmed gear knob (manual transmission only)
  • Cruise control with speed limiter
  • Quickclear heated windscreen with heated washer jets

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £19,895 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £23,895 for the 1.5L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

Titanium

The 2019 Ford Focus Titanium Estate

Another trim level that was once top of the Ford model tree is Titanium. Key additions include keyless start, front and rear parking sensors and sat-nav as standard and the introduction of the 1.5-litre ecoboost petrol and 2.0-litre ecoBlue diesel engines to the line-up both with 148bhp.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (100/125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (150)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (95/120)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue diesel (150)

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features, in addition to Zetec

  • 16″ 15-spoke alloy wheels in ‘Sparkle Silver’ finish
  • Upper grille with chrome surround and horizontal bars
  • LED rear lights
  • Rain sensing wipers
  • Power folding door mirrors with puddle lights
  • Front and rear parking sensors
  • Ford KeyFree System with Keyless Entry and Keyless Start(with Motion Sensing Key Fob)

Key interior features, in addition to Zetec

  • Navigation system
  • 8″ colour touchscreen
  • 4.2″ TFT coloured cluster
  • FordPass Connect
  • Dual-zone Electronic Automatic Temperature Control
  • Heated front seats
  • Passenger seat manual height & lumbar adjust
  • Front and rear floor mats
  • Rear seat centre armrest with cupholder
  • Ambient lighting
  • Auto-dimming rear view mirror

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £22,145 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £27,095 for the 2.0L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

Titanium X

Titanium X adds a layer of luxury to Titanium with a little extra leather and a power-adjust drivers’ seat. That’s pretty much it in terms of what’s new.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (100/125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (150)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (95/120)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue diesel (150)

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features, in addition to Titanium

  • 17″ 10×2-spoke alloy wheels in ‘Luster Nickel’ Finish
  • Privacy glass

Key interior features, in addition to Titanium

  • Partial leather trim
  • Soft console knee pads
  • Unique door and instrument panel inserts
  • 6-way power adjust driver seat

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £23,395 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £28,345 for the 2.0L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

Vignale

The 2019 Ford Focus Vignale hatchback

Vignale is the most luxurious Focus ever and adds leather wrapped interior and seats a premium sound system and a whole host of other toys into the mix. Stand-out additions to this trim include the heads-up display, reversing camera and heated steering wheel. The seats are brilliant and instead of 148bhp, the 1.5-litre engine puts out 180bhp.

Review: Ford Focus Vignale

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (182)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (120)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue diesel (150)

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features, in addition to Titanium

  • 18″ 5×3-spoke alloy wheels in ‘Liquid Aluminium’ finish
  • LED headlights
  • LED front fog lamps with cornering function
  • Unique Vignale front grille & bodystyling
  • Privacy glass
  • Door edge protectors

Key interior features, in addition to Titanium

  • B&O Audio System with 360° sound, with 10 high-series speakers and Digital Sound Processor
  • Rear wide-view camera
  • Active Park Assist
  • Full Vignale leather seat trim
  • Front and rear Vignale floor mats
  • 6-way power adjust driver seat
  • Ambient lighting with multi-colour LED
  • Head-up display
  • Heated steering wheel
  • Load through ski hatch
The interior of the 2019 Ford Focus Vignale

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £26,145 for the1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £31,095 for the 2.0L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

ST-Line

The 2019 Ford Focus ST-Line hatchback

ST-line models take their design queues from the sporty ST performance model. As well as a sportier looking bodykit and a spoiler, compared with Zetec, ST-Line models get a twin chrome exhaust, sports suspension, and an interior filled with sporty red stitching and aluminium ST-line details.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (150)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (120)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue diesel (150)

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features, in addition to Zetec

  • 17″ 5×2-spoke alloy wheels in ‘Rock Metallic’ finish
  • Large body colour rear spoiler
  • LED front fog lamps with cornering function
  • Unique ST-Line upper & lower grille with full bodystyling kit
  • Polished twin tailpipe
  • ST-Line wing badges
  • Sports tuned suspension

Key interior features, in addition to Zetec

  • Flat bottomed steering wheel with red stitching
  • Aluminium gear knob (manual transmission only)
  • Alloy finish pedals
  • Trim with red stitching
  • Dark headliner
  • Keyless start with Ford Power Starter Button

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £22,146 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £27,095 for the 2.0L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

ST-Line X

There’s a bigger list of additions between ST-Line and ST-Line X models compared with Titanium and Titanium X. Key additions to ST-Line X include sat nav, red brake calipers, dual-zone A/C and partial leather. ST-Line X models also replace the 148bhp ecoboost petrol with the 180bhp version also seen in the Vignale.

Review: Ford Focus ST-Line X 

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (182)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (120)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue diesel (150)

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features, in addition to ST-Line

  • 18″ 5×2-spoke “Matt Black” machined finish alloy wheels
  • Red brake calipers
  • Power folding door mirrors with puddle lights
  • Front and rear parking sensors
  • Privacy glass
  • Rain sensing wipers

Key interior features, in addition to ST-Line

  • Navigation
  • 4.2” TFT coloured cluster
  • 8” colour touchscreen
  • FordPass Connect
  • Auto-dimming rear view mirror
  • Partial leather trim with red stitching
  • Soft console knee pads with red stitching
  • Front & rear floor mats with red stitching
  • 6-way power adjust driver seat
  • Passenger seat manual height & lumbar adjust
  • Heated front seats
  • Dual-zone Electronic Air Temperature Control (DEATC)

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £24,645 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £29,595 for the 2.0L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

Active

The 2019 Ford Focus Active hatchback

Active models bring off-road styling queues and raised ride height for buyers who like rugged-looking vehicles but prefer to stick to a traditional hatchback rather than opting for an SUV or crossover. Equipment wise Active is a mixed bag with selectable drive modes (Slippery and trail mode), sat nav and keyless start the main non-cosmetic upgrades compared with Zetec. There are lots of styling upgrades that make this a distinctive and stylish option though.

You can’t get the 148bhp version of the diesel engine on the Active level without moving up to Active X.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (150)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (120)

Standard Equipment
Key features, in addition to Zetec

  • 17″ 5-spoke “Foundry Black” painted/machined alloy wheels
  • Raised ride height (30 mm higher than standard)
  • LED front fog lamps with cornering function
  • Black painted roof & mirror caps
  • Black roof rails on 5 door & estate
  • Active front & rear bumper with unique upper & lower grille
  • Unique skid plates & side rocker mouldings
  •  Twin exhaust tailpipes
  • Privacy glass
  • Selectable Drive Modes with Slippery & Trail mode
  • Active branded scuff plates
  • Trim with blue stitching
  • Keyless Start with Ford Power Start Button
  • SYNC 3 with voice control
  • 4.2” TFT coloured cluster
  • Navigation
  • Front & rear floor mats with blue stitching
  • Unique door and instrument panel inserts
  • 6-way power adjust driver seat
  • Front passenger seat manual height & lumbar adjust
  • Heated front seats
  • Dual-zone Electronic Air Temperature Control (DEATC)
  • FordPass Connect**

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £22,145 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £25,645 for the 1.5L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

Active X

Active X adds some of the higher-end touches, such as dual-zone A/C, partial leather and parking sensors to the Active range. You also get a panoramic sun-roof but bear in mind this means hatchback models need to lose the roof-rails to accommodate this.

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 1.0L EcoBoost petrol (125)
  • 1.5L Ecoboost petrol (182)
  • 1.5L EcoBlue diesel (120)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue diesel (150)

Standard Equipment

  • Key exterior features in addition to Active
  • 18″ 5×2-spoke “Absolute Black” painted/machined alloy wheels
  • Panorama roof
  • Autowipers and auto-dimming rear-view mirror
  • Parking distance sensors
  • Electrically-operated and heated, power-foldable door mirrors with body colour housings and integrated side indicators

Key interior features in addition to Active

  • Ford KeyFree System with Ford Power starter button
  • Dual-zone Electronic Automatic Temperature Control (DEATC) air conditioning
  • Driver and front passenger heated seats
  • Partial leather trim with blue stitching
  • Radio with 8″ touchscreen display with DAB, Ford SYNC 3 with Voice Control, plus Bluetooth® and USB connectivity, navigation and six speakers
  • FordPass Connect on-board modem**

Prices start at £24,648 for 1.0L Ecoboost and top out at £29,595 for the 2.0L diesel Estate with an auto transmission, before optional extras.

ST

The 2019 Ford Focus ST

Available in five-door and estate configuration, you can once again get the Focus ST with both Petrol and Diesel powerplants. The 276bhp, 2.3-litre Ecoboost petrol engine is the faster of the two with a 5.7-second nought to 62mph time, while the 187bhp, 2.0-litre EcoBlue diesel engine posts a respectable 7.6-second time.

Standard Equipment

Key exterior features in addition to ST-Line X

  • 19″ 5×2-spoke alloy wheels in Magnetite finish
  • Painted red brake calipers
  • Rear-view parking camera with wide-angle display
  • Adaptive full LED headlights
  • Rear LED Taillights
  • ST badging
  • Scuff plates – Front, polished stainless steel with etched ‘ST’ logo
  • e-LSD (Electronic Limited Slip Differential) (Petrol Only)
  • Continuously Controlled Damping (CCD) Suspension**

Key interior features in addition to ST-Line X

  • B&O Premium Audio System (360° sound, 10 speakers, 675 Watts & Digital Sound Processor)
  • Adaptive Cruise Control with Lane-Centring Assist (includes Stop & Go with auto transmission only)
  • Recaro Partial Leather Seats (Dinamica Ebony Black Metal Grey Piping and Stitching)
  • Driver and Passenger Heated Seats
  • Heated Steering Wheel
  • Ford KeyFree System (with Motion Sensing Key Fob)
  • Front and Rear Floor Mats (Metal Grey Stitching)

Engines available with this trim are:

  • 2.3L Ecoboost Petrol (280)
  • 2.0L EcoBlue Diesel (190)

How much does it cost?

Prices start at £29,495 for the five-door diesel and top out at £33,095 for the petrol estate, before optional extras.

The post 2019 Ford Focus Buyer’s guide: reviews, model specs and how much each 2019 Ford Focus costs appeared first on inews.co.uk.

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2019 Subaru Levorg review – keeping it simple

The Levorg is Subaru’s weird-named successor to the old Legacy four-wheel-drive estate. ‘Levorg’ is a mash-up of the words ‘LEgacy’ ‘eVOlution’ and ‘touRinG’, er, obviously, and strange name aside, it’s a fairly conventional looking two-box estate car.

That – bear with me – makes it pretty unconventional in the UK market. For a start, there’s no saloon or hatchback version of this car. Second, if you’re interested in buying one there’s no confusion of trim levels, drivetrains and engine options to navigate.

If you want to buy a Subaru Levorg, you can buy the same Subaru Levorg as everybody else. There is a single engine option – 2.0-litre petrol – with a single power output – 147bhp – with a single automatic CVT transmission and no choice of trim level. You can choose one of six colours.

Compare that to the Ford Focus which currently has 10 trim levels, five engine options, three suspension configurations and two different transmission options – not to mention a laundry list of optional extras for an entrepreneurial salesman to convince you you need.

It means if you walk into a Subaru dealership there won’t be any upselling or mucking around and you can either afford the £30,995 price tag or you can buy another car.

There's only one trim level but it's well equipped. (Photo: Subaru)
There’s only one trim level but it’s well equipped. (Photo: Subaru)

Subaru Levorg GT

Price: £30,995
Engine: 2.0-litre, 4-cylinder, petrol
Power: 147bhp
Torque:146lb/ft
Transmission: CVT automatic
Top speed: 130mph
0-62mph: 8.9 seconds
Efficiency: 32.6mpg
CO2 emissions: 167g/km

So should you walk into that dealership?

Subaru refreshed the Levorg – first launched in 2015 – in May this year, touching up the front bumper and 18-inch alloy wheels, adding new LED headlights, upgrading the interior materials and adding new safety technology including adaptive cruise control, pre-collision braking, blind spot monitoring and lane departure warning.

For parking convenience there’s now a front-view camera as well as parking sensors and the now fairly typical rear-view one.

The biggest change though, is the replacement of the old 1.6-litre engine with the new 2.0-litre one.

The Levorg's interior materials have been upgraded. (Photo: Subaru)
The Levorg’s interior materials have been upgraded. (Photo: Subaru)

I drove the pre-facelift Levorg a year or two back and, while I wouldn’t have been able to tell you everything that was different without checking the spec sheet, it straight away feels a far more modern and well-equipped car overall despite the subtlety of the visual and tactile upgrades to the interior.

With 147bhp available from the naturally-aspirated 2.0-litre engine and a circa nine-second nought to 60mph time, the Levorg isn’t particularly fast or powerful even with the new engine.

The CVT gearbox doesn’t make as bad a noise as some examples of the breed, but in terms of performance it’s a bit lackadaisical as it searches for the right ratio.

The handling though, is excellent. The ride is firm, which is slightly juxtaposed against the lazy acceleration, but that translates to very stable cornering. The steering set-up is pin sharp and you can really feel Subaru’s rally heritage in the corners – it would be a lot of fun with a bit more power.

A large boot and all-wheel-drive make the Subaru Levorg a practical choice. (Photo: Subaru)
A large boot and all-wheel-drive make the Subaru Levorg a practical choice. (Photo: Subaru)

With Subaru’s symmetrical all-wheel drive, the Levorg will be capable off road, although lacking the ground clearance of an SUV this isn’t a car intended for driving over bumpy fields or wadi bashing.

It’s not especially fuel efficient, with an official average of 32.6mpg and nor is it cheap – but with a single model in the range you at least know what you are paying and it’s extremely well equipped. Many competitors that appear cheaper on the face of it will creep up as optional extras, safety packs and premium paints are added.

Levorg is an odd-ball name and by nature so is the car. Despite its faults, I can’t help but like it.

2019 Subaru Levorg
(Photo: Subaru)

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Review: Moshi SnapTo Magnetic Car Mount

Price: £39.95 and iGlaze case for iPhone 7 Plus in Pearl White, £34.95

It’s been a while since I’ve used a car mount. For the last couple of years I’ve been more of a ‘chuck the phone into the little spot under the stereo for your loose change’ kind of a guy, partly because I’m often testing newly-released models with Apple Car Play, but also because the last car mount I used had a spring and pressure grip and it burst into pieces when I tried to fit it around my iPhone 7 Plus.

The Moshi SnapTo mount comes with a case with two metal tabs that fit into the back and the phone just snaps to the magnetic plate – no exploding springs in sight.

The case comes separately and there are a variety of options – some pretty stylish – ranging from £29.95 – £44.95. They can be bought as part of a bundle with the mount at a £10 discount.

I don’t totally get why there is assembly required for the case – you have to stick the adhesive metal mounting points into the case yourself – but it’s really simple to do, and after 30 seconds for the adhesive to dry you’re good to go.

There are two options for mounting the base unit to your vehicle. The first, and simplest, is to slot the grips into your car air vents. If that’s not an option for you, there’s an adhesive pad that can fix to the dashboard itself – but it needs to be a pretty flat surface. The adhesive can hold up to 1 kg of weight and is strong enough for four iPhones – although why you’d want to do that is beyond me.

Moshi SnapTo mount

The dashboard of my 13-year-old Mondeo is all lumps and bumps, so the adhesive mount was out for me. Instead I used the vent grip. The phone looked a bit precarious once mounted and I was half expecting it to clatter to the footwell at the first pothole.

Despite a slight wobble, it held my 188g phone securely for the entire test, surviving pitted country roads and offshoots of the North Coast 500, suburban speed bumps and emergency stops.

For an extra £20, you can get a version of the mount that supports wireless charging. If you buy that version the mount needs to plug into a power supply so there’s a cable to think about anyway – strikes me you might be better to just save the cash and plug the lightning cable straight from your phone to the power supply, but I’m a notorious cheapskate.

SnapTo_Car_Mount_Wireless_Charging_LS_17

Both versions support landscape viewing and the unit feels no less stable for being in a landscape, rather than portrait mode.

In all, the Moshi mount is easy to use, does its job well and with its dual mounting options will be compatible with most cars. It is expensive though particularly if you go for one of the more high-end looking cases.

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How you can avoid being the victim of road rage, according to a road safety expert

A road safety specialist has offered guidance to drivers on how to change their behaviour in order to reduce their chances of becoming a road rage victim.

GEM Motoring Assist is encouraging drivers to protect themselves by being alert to early signs of road rage and Neil Worth, road safety officer at GEM, has offered five pieces of advice for drivers to consider in the hope of avoiding confrontation on the roads.

Neil comments: “Most of us will have some experience of being on the receiving end of someone else’s aggression. Thankfully, violent and unprovoked attacks are rare, but it pays to be observant and if possible to recognise signs of trouble at their earliest stages.”

“We encourage drivers to leave plenty of time for their journeys, which means they can feel calm and in control at the wheel. Stress can lead to risk taking, and this in turn increases the likelihood of aggressive incidents.

“We also urge drivers to avoid becoming involved in situations they recognise as dangerous or risky. If you’re worried about another driver who may be in danger, then stop and call the police.”

Read more: Jaw-dropping dash cam video shows car flipped onto its roof in 100mph road rage crash

How serious an issue is road rage in the UK?

Road rage incidents can be extremely distressing for victims. The RAC reported in December 2018 that almost half of UK drivers had been a victim of road rage (43 per cent), with female drivers most likely to be targeted. Eighty per cent of women responding to the RAC survey said that the incident ‘stayed with them’ hours after the incident itself, while 63 per cent of men agreed.

As well as being distressing, aggressive behaviour on the roads can be fatal. Department for Transport figures from 2018 showed that more than 5,000 people were either killed or injured in collisions where aggressive driving was a contributing factor in a three-year period.

Commenting on the RAC  report, Richard Gladman, head of driving and riding standards at road safety charity IAM Roadsmart, called on motorists to look at their own behaviour, saying: “Road rage does not affect everyone every day. If you’re finding it is happening very often, you might want to think about how you engage with other road users.”

How can I avoid being a victim of road rage?

While victims should not feel that they are at fault if they have been targeted by an aggressive driver, here are some behaviours that Neil Worth, from GEM, says can help you avoid becoming a victim:

  • Keep calm and show restraint. Every journey brings the risk of frustration and conflict. Make a pledge to be patient. Avoid using your horn or making gestures in anger.
  • Avoid competition and resist the desire to ‘get even’. If the standard of someone else’s driving disappoints you, don’t attempt to educate or rebuke them.
  • Don’t push into traffic queues. If you wait and clearly signal, you won’t wait long before another drive lets you in.
Busy traffic in the UK
Waiting for someone to let you change lanes is less likely to annoy other drivers. Credit: Shutterstock
  • Say thank you, say sorry. Courtesy encourages co-operation on the road. If you make a mistake (and we all do!) or perhaps cut things a bit fine, then a gesture of apology avoids confrontation and helps defuse anger.
  • Move away from trouble. If you feel seriously threatened by another driver, then ensure your car doors are locked and drive (at legal speed) to the nearest police station or busy area (petrol station forecourts are ideal). Use your mobile phone to alert the police. Pressing the horn repeatedly or continuously is likely to deter a potential attacker.

I’m an angry driver, how can I avoid succumbing to my rage?

If a significant proportion of British drivers are reporting that they have been victims of road rage, it stands to reason that many have also been the perpetrator. Advice from the RAC on how to avoid becoming the wrongdoer in a road rage incident is markedly similar to the advice on how to avoid becoming a victim:

  • Stay calm, and if you feel yourself becoming overwhelmed by the stress of a drive, consider pulling over.
  • Don’t retaliate to aggressive or bad driving.
  • Ignore aggressive behaviour from other road users. It’s safer to let someone past rather than matching a dangerous driver’s behaviour.
  • Acknowledge your mistakes and even if you’re not in the wrong, consider apologising.

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