The 66 Tories who voted against ‘Malthouse Two”

Several Ministers helped to see off the Government’s best hope of avoiding a full-on crisis in the Party – and perhaps of saving Brexit too.

This morning, our editor identified the Green Amendment – so-called ‘Malthouse II’, or ‘Amendment F’ – as the Government’s best hope saving the Conservative Party, if not Brexit itself.

Backed by Conservative and DUP MPs, the motion (which we detailed here) sought to ease the path towards a no-deal exit by giving businesses more information and brokering so-called ‘standstill’ arrangements with the EU.

However the Government did not whip in support of the motion, and on a free vote – and with the usual power of the whip and payroll already disintegrating – several high-profile members of the Cabinet helped to see it convincingly defeated.

  • Richard Bacon
  • Guto Bebb
  • Nick Boles
  • Jack Brereton
  • Steve Brine
  • Alistair Burt
  • James Cartlidge
  • Alex Chalk
  • Jo Churchill
  • Greg Clark

 

  • Kenneth Clarke
  • Stephen Crabb
  • Tracey Crouch
  • Jonathan Djanogly
  • Jackie Doyle-Price
  • Mark Field
  • Vicky Ford
  • Kevin Foster
  • Roger Gale
  • David Gauke

 

  • Nick Gibb
  • Bill Grant
  • Justine Greening
  • Dominic Grieve
  • Andrew Griffiths
  • Sam Gyimah
  • Luke Hall
  • Richard Harrington
  • Oliver Heald
  • Peter Heaton-Jones

 

  • Simon Hoare
  • Philip Hollobone
  • John Howell
  • Nigel Huddleston
  • Margot James
  • Marcus Jones
  • Phillip Lee
  • Oliver Letwin
  • David Lidington
  • Alan Mak

 

  • Paul Masterton
  • Johnny Mercer
  • Huw Merriman
  • Anne Milton
  • Damien Moore
  • Anne Marie Morris
  • David Morris
  • James Morris
  • Robert Neill
  • Andrew Percy

 

  • Claire Perry
  • Victoria Prentis
  • Mark Pritchard
  • Douglas Ross
  • Amber Rudd
  • Antoinette Sandbach
  • Chloe Smith
  • Nicholas Soames
  • Caroline Spelman
  • Rory Stewart

 

  • Gary Streeter
  • Kelly Tolhurst
  • Ed Vaizey
  • Matt Warman
  • Giles Watling
  • Mike Wood

Yesterday in the Commons. More opponents than supporters of the Prime Minister’s deal on the Conservative backbenchers.

That said, there was more backing for her from her party than some of today’s headlines suggest.

Distinguishing a supportive question to a Minister from the Conservative backbenches from a non-supportive one is necessarily a term of art.

With that cautionary qualification in mind, we offer our best shot at estimating which questions to the Prime Minister from her own Party were supportive, non-supportive, and neutral – for example, requests for information.

We do so simply to get a flavour of where Tory MPs are on the proposed Brexit deal, to which the answer, as you might expect, is “deeply divided”.

This morning’s headlines suggest that Theresa May had a more hostile reception than our breakdown suggests, but you are in a very bad fix as Prime Minister when the number of unsupportive questions outnumbers the number of supportive ones/

Supportive backbenchers

  • Peter Bottomley
  • James Cleverly
  • Alberto Costa
  • Vicky Ford
  • Richard Graham
  • Damian Green
  • Patrick McLoughlin
  • Huw Merriman
  • Andrew Murrison
  • James Heappey
  • Nick Herbert
  • Neil O’Brien
  • Andrew Percy
  • Nicholas Soames
  • Matt Warman

Total: 15

– – –

Neutral

  • Peter Aldous
  • Luke Graham
  • Kirstene Hair
  • Greg Hands
  • Caroline Johnson
  • Marcus Jones
  • Jeremy Lefroy
  • Edward Leigh
  • Maggie Throup
  • David Tredennick
  • Martin Vickers
  • Bill Wiggin
  • William Wragg

Total: 13

– – –

Unsupportive backbenchers

  • Steve Baker
  • Peter Bone
  • Conor Burns
  • Bill Cash
  • Mark Francois
  • Justine Greening
  • Dominic Grieve
  • Boris Johnson
  • David Jones
  • Owen Paterson
  • Mike Penning
  • Dominic Raab
  • Jacob Rees-Mogg
  • Desmond Swayne
  • Michael Tomlinson
  • Ross Thomson
  • Theresa Villiers
  • Sarah Wollaston

Total: 18