Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation – and more.

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

British Transport Police Authority – Members

“Members of the BTPA play an active role in working towards ensuring that an effective and efficient police service is provided on the railways. Collectively, the BTPA will be accountable for the discharge of the responsibilities set out in the legislation. Members’ primary responsibility will be to the work of the BTPA as a whole rather than as a representative of any area from which they may come. In order to fulfil this role, the Secretary of State expects that a Member will be required to commit 30 days a year to BTPA business, although this may not necessarily arise in a regular pattern. Whilst the majority of the work will take place in Camden in London, where both the BTPA and BTP Force headquarters are based, there may be some requirement to travel to other parts of the country where the BTP operates.”

Time: 30 days per annum.

Remuneration: £16,497 per annum.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation

“The Chief Inspector has a duty to ensure the inspection of probation and youth offending services in England and Wales and provide independent scrutiny of the quality of work undertaken with individual offenders. Probation provision is currently delivered by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) which are subject to contract management oversight by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and the National Probation Service (NPS), which is directly line managed as part of HMPPS. HMI Probation is responsible for delivering and developing programmes of inspection and the inspection methodology or “framework” against which both probation services provision and Youth Offending Teams are inspected. The Chief Inspector is actively engaged in leading the day to day inspection process.”

Time: Full-time, three years.

Remuneration: £135,000 per annum, pensionable.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

HS2 Ltd – Non-Executive Directors

“As Non-Executive Director, you will champion the HS2 vision and objectives, challenging Board decisions where appropriate to maintain the aspired strategic direction and culture of the organisation whilst holding the leadership team to account for effective and efficient delivery against the agreed strategy and business plan. This will include offering alternative perspectives to the sector norm, with the ability to consider strategic, complex and often sensitive issues from an informed and balanced perspective. You will need recent and relevant Executive Board or Non-Executive Director experience with the tenacity and interpersonal skills to operate in a high profile organisation tasked with delivering against demanding objectives.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £950 per diem.

Closes: 16 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Health and Care Professions Council – Chair of Council

“We are seeking to appoint a Chair of Council. You will have experience of providing strong non-executive leadership and be able to uphold the principles of transparency and accountability in all of the HCPC’s activities. You will act as an ambassador for the HCPC, influencing and building effective relationships internally and externally with a range of senior level stakeholders, inspiring confidence in the organisation and promoting the organisation’s central commitment to public protection. The Chair of Council appointment is open to both Lay and Registrant candidates. The HCPC is committed to equality of opportunity and actively guards against unfair discrimination on any grounds (including sexual orientation, religion or beliefs, race, sex, age or disability). We are a UK-wide regulator and encourage applicants from all countries of the UK.”

Time: Three days per week approx.

Remuneration: £65,000 annual allowance.

Closes: 19 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Met Office – Non-Executive Directors

“The Met Office employs around 1900 people in sites across the UK and overseas. It operates as a Trading Fund, meaning that, whilst it is sponsored by HM Government, it self-funds through the services it provides to its diverse client base. The Met Office steering Board has a vital role in advising and supporting the Chief Executive and the Executive Team to deliver the organisation’s strategic priorities and ensuring that resources are allocated effectively for their delivery. The Board reviews the management and performance of the Met Office and ensures high standards of corporate governance are maintained… As a Non-Executive Director (NED) on the Met Office Board, you will have an important and demanding role and will provide a valuable external perspective to the organisation. This includes providing influence and access to networks which the organisation would otherwise not have.”

Time: 27 days per annum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 26 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 27 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Committee on Fuel Poverty – Member

“The Committee on Fuel Poverty (CFP) advises the Government on the effectiveness of policies aimed at reducing fuel poverty to help keep UK residents warm and improve energy efficiency in their homes. It also persuades greater co-ordination across organisations working to reduce fuel poverty in the UK… The responsibilities of the new Members will include monitoring and reporting on progress towards the Government’s 2030 fuel poverty target and interim milestones, supporting and challenging the Government on its delivery approach, and encouraging a partnership approach between and within Government and stakeholders in tackling fuel poverty.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £8400 per annum plus reasonable travel and subsistence.

Closes: 06 December

William Shawcross: May and Brokenshire must not let Scruton be hounded from his post

His long career evinces both a real understanding of issues such as antisemitism and a philospher’s willingness to change his mind.

William Shawcross is a former head of the Charity Commission and and official biographer of the Queen MOther.

When Sir Roger Scruton was knighted in the Queen’s Birthday Honours in 2016, the official announcement said he was “often described as Britain’s foremost philosopher”. He is that and much more.

His knighthood was for “services to philosophy, teaching and public education”. It could just as well have been for his courageous work during the 1980s, when he travelled repeatedly – and at considerable risk – to communist Central Europe, forging links with dissident academics and students in Czechoslovakia and elsewhere.

For those activities, he was in June 1985 detained, expelled from Czechoslovakia, and placed on the communist government’s “Index of Undesirable Persons” – a badge of honour that saw him feted by Vaclav Havel in the Czech Republic after the fall of Communism.

Yesterday a little-known blog and a few tweeters – including, alas, a couple of Labour MPs who should have known better – tried to place him on their own “index of undesirable persons”. Their reasons for doing so were feeble and their evidence scant. But it seems to be mainly because of a speech that he gave in Hungary in 2016, the same year as his knighthood.

The key passage – which is being selectively quoted – is as follows:

“Many of the Budapest intelligentsia are Jewish, and form part of the extensive networks around the Soros Empire. People in these networks include many who are rightly suspicious of nationalism, regard nationalism as the major cause of the tragedy of Central Europe in the 20th Century, and do not distinguish nationalism from the kind of national loyalty that I have defended in this talk. Moreover, as the world knows, indigenous anti-Semitism still plays a part in Hungarian society and politics, and presents an obstacle to the emergence of a shared national loyalty among ethnic Hungarians and Jews.”

For this, he is accused of being someone who “peddles anti-Semitic conspiracy theories”. His accusers demand that the Prime Minister and James Brokenshire, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities, and Local Government who on Saturday appointed him to lead the new Building Better, Building Beautiful Commission, drop him. That would be grossly wrong.

The hunt is now on, it seems, to find incriminating remarks in his life’s work. He is the author of more than 50 books on philosophy, politics, the arts and more. He has written thousands of essays and articles and given countless interviews (including those in which he has recanted previously asserted beliefs). For example, one article published yesterday afternoon accused him of “controversial comments” about Islamophobia and homosexuality. These former comments are worth quoting:

“Muslims in our society are often victims of prejudice, abuse, and assault, and this is a distressing situation that the law strives to remedy. But when people invent a phobia to explain all criticism of Islam, it is not that kind of abuse that they have in mind. They wish to hide the truth, to shout ‘lies!’ in the face of criticism, and to silence any attempt at discussion. In my view, however, it is time to bring the truth into the open.”

Some may disagree with these views, but must Sir Roger be silenced for holding them? He seems to be alert to the problem of anti-Muslim hatred, but sceptical about the definition of Islamophobia. That may irritate some, but if philosophers cannot think, write and speak freely, what is the point of them?

Similarly, on homophobia, it is clear that he has revised his views. As he told The Guardian in 2010, referring to an earlier essay about homophobia, “I wouldn’t stand by what I said then.” People’s views – especially if they are philosophers, one hopes – change over time and this is perfectly normal. It is also worth noting that his appointment by the Government relates to the design and style of buildings, a fact which risks getting lost in a blizzard of confected outrage.

Three things are worth adding on the subject of antisemitism – and quickly, because as the saying goes, “falsehood flies and the truth comes limping after it”.

First, I have known Sir Roger for many years and do not believe for a moment that he has an antisemitic bone in his body. Indeed, as the final sentence of the above quotation demonstrates, he is acutely aware of the problem of antisemitism in Hungary. Moreover, as his autobiography movingly explains, he is of German-Jewish ancestry himself.

Secondly, Sir Roger is not guilty by association simply for having travelled to Hungary and for knowing Viktor Orban. The facts are that he helped Orban and others set up an independent law school, the Jogusz-Szakkollegium, in the days of communism. He lectured in the school, as part of his mission to encourage young people to work for the liberation of their countries. The school played a significant role in the collapse of the regime.

Another overlooked fact: Sir Roger also personally lobbied Orban’s government not to close down the Central European University in Budapest, founded by Soros. He is not uncritical of Orban and, like many people in the UK, approves of some his policies and disapproves of others.

The third and final point. Antisemitism is a serious problem in countries like Hungary – but also in supposedly more enlightened places like our own, particularly these days on the left of politics. It is a virus that mutates from generation to generation, and must be dealt with vigorously wherever it emerges. No one should accuse anyone else of antisemitism frivolously or for mere political gain. It is a very serious charge and in this case it is entirely without merit.

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Chair of the Office of Tax Simplification – and more.

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Home Office – Immigration Services Commissioner

“A rare and exciting opportunity has arisen to become the new Commissioner of the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC). The OISC is an independent executive non-departmental public body with approximately 60 staff. The Commissioner is the head of the organisation and is appointed by the Home Secretary. The role of the OISC is to regulate individuals or organisations who provide immigration advice to members of the public and who are not practising lawyers and are therefore not regulated by another body. The primary way in which the OISC performs this function is by ensuring that these immigration advisers are registered with them and that action is taken against those who provide advice or services without being registered. The regulatory scheme applies to over 1500 organisations and over 3000 immigration advisers.”

Time: Three days per week.

Remuneration: £66,000 per annum.

Closes: 11 November

– – – – – – – – – –

British Transport Police Authority – Members

“Members of the BTPA play an active role in working towards ensuring that an effective and efficient police service is provided on the railways. Collectively, the BTPA will be accountable for the discharge of the responsibilities set out in the legislation. Members’ primary responsibility will be to the work of the BTPA as a whole rather than as a representative of any area from which they may come. In order to fulfil this role, the Secretary of State expects that a Member will be required to commit 30 days a year to BTPA business, although this may not necessarily arise in a regular pattern. Whilst the majority of the work will take place in Camden in London, where both the BTPA and BTP Force headquarters are based, there may be some requirement to travel to other parts of the country where the BTP operates.”

Time: 30 days per annum.

Remuneration: £16,497 per annum.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation

“The Chief Inspector has a duty to ensure the inspection of probation and youth offending services in England and Wales and provide independent scrutiny of the quality of work undertaken with individual offenders. Probation provision is currently delivered by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) which are subject to contract management oversight by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and the National Probation Service (NPS), which is directly line managed as part of HMPPS. HMI Probation is responsible for delivering and developing programmes of inspection and the inspection methodology or “framework” against which both probation services provision and Youth Offending Teams are inspected. The Chief Inspector is actively engaged in leading the day to day inspection process.”

Time: Full-time, three years.

Remuneration: £135,000 per annum, pensionable.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

HS2 Ltd – Non-Executive Directors

“As Non-Executive Director, you will champion the HS2 vision and objectives, challenging Board decisions where appropriate to maintain the aspired strategic direction and culture of the organisation whilst holding the leadership team to account for effective and efficient delivery against the agreed strategy and business plan. This will include offering alternative perspectives to the sector norm, with the ability to consider strategic, complex and often sensitive issues from an informed and balanced perspective. You will need recent and relevant Executive Board or Non-Executive Director experience with the tenacity and interpersonal skills to operate in a high profile organisation tasked with delivering against demanding objectives.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £950 per diem.

Closes: 16 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Health and Care Professions Council – Chair of Council

“We are seeking to appoint a Chair of Council. You will have experience of providing strong non-executive leadership and be able to uphold the principles of transparency and accountability in all of the HCPC’s activities. You will act as an ambassador for the HCPC, influencing and building effective relationships internally and externally with a range of senior level stakeholders, inspiring confidence in the organisation and promoting the organisation’s central commitment to public protection. The Chair of Council appointment is open to both Lay and Registrant candidates. The HCPC is committed to equality of opportunity and actively guards against unfair discrimination on any grounds (including sexual orientation, religion or beliefs, race, sex, age or disability). We are a UK-wide regulator and encourage applicants from all countries of the UK.”

Time: Three days per week approx.

Remuneration: £65,000 annual allowance.

Closes: 19 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Met Office – Non-Executive Directors

“The Met Office employs around 1900 people in sites across the UK and overseas. It operates as a Trading Fund, meaning that, whilst it is sponsored by HM Government, it self-funds through the services it provides to its diverse client base. The Met Office steering Board has a vital role in advising and supporting the Chief Executive and the Executive Team to deliver the organisation’s strategic priorities and ensuring that resources are allocated effectively for their delivery. The Board reviews the management and performance of the Met Office and ensures high standards of corporate governance are maintained… As a Non-Executive Director (NED) on the Met Office Board, you will have an important and demanding role and will provide a valuable external perspective to the organisation. This includes providing influence and access to networks which the organisation would otherwise not have.”

Time: 27 days per annum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 26 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 27 November

Iain Mansfield: We must recapture the commanding heights of society from the Left

It has secured an overwhelming dominance. Until or unless this changes, the Right may win elections – but to limited effect.

Iain Mansfield is a former senior civil servant, winner of the Institute of Economic Affairs Brexit prize and a Conservative councillor candidate. He writes in a personal capacity.

A stark feature of the 2017 election was the emergence of an army of independent groups and organisations backing Labour, with very few backing the Conservatives. From ivory trading to welfare reform, school funding to tuition fees, influential groups were queuing up to support the policies of the Left. The election demonstrated that whilst the Conservative Party can still win more votes, the Left has secured an overwhelming dominance amongst those traditionally seen as opinion formers and societal leaders.

A poll held shortly before the election found that fewer than one in ten university staff members were planning to vote Conservative. Statistics amongst teachers are similar, with the BBC recently quoting a former Conservative teacher as saying, “Walking into a teachers’ room is like walking into a socialist convention.” The major charities, many of which receive the bulk of their funding directly from the state rather than from individuals, are vastly more sympathetic to Labour, and the Archbishop of Canterbury, as well as other senior bishops, regularly criticise Conservative policies in the press. The civil service is a little more balanced, though the startlingly consistent views of former permanent secretaries on Brexit demonstrates that the broad church of conservatism does not appear to be well-represented at the highest levels.

It wasn’t always this way. The Church of England was once known as ‘The Tory Party at prayer’, whilst the Sir Humphreys of their day were stalwarts of conservatism. Academia has always had a Marxist streak, but as late as the 1950s it was credible for CP Snow to set a novel in a Cambridge college divided into left-wing and right-wing factions. The Left also had its strongholds, from the trade unions to the Fabian Society, which groups on both sides contributing to the public debate.

We cannot simply abandon entire swathes of society to the left. This is true not simply for the short-term goal of winning votes, but  because of the importance of such institutions in shaping society as a whole, including via the education of the young and the contribution to political and societal discourse. An important part to this is ensuring there are no areas of society where Conservative voices cannot be heard, as Sam Gyimah, Jacob Rees-Mogg and others are doing with their campus tours. But if we are to reclaim these institutions for conservatism, we must do much more.

A more positive approach to the public sector

As Conservatives, we rightly believe that the private sector can often do a better job than the public sector at delivering the outcomes that people want. It is important to remember, however, that this is for structural reasons: the incredible power of prices as signalling mechanisms, or the way that meaningful competition can unleash innovation and improvements in performance.

Too often when speaking on this subject, some Conservative politicians give the impression that they believe that people who work in the private sector are innately better, more capable or harder working – a conclusion that is not just wrong, as anyone who has spoken to a nurse or teacher will tell you, but which understandably alienates hard working public sector employees, driving them into the arms of our opponents. When championing the  private sector we must ensure we do so for the right reasons, and do not simultaneous denigrate the public sector.

Alongside this, as many Conservative MPs have already called for, we must take a more compassionate approach to public sector salaries, particularly for those on lower and middle incomes. The touch decisions taken by the Coalition to freeze pay and reform pensions were badly needed, but after eight years of pay restraint, salary increases in line with inflation are essential if we are to granted a fair hearing.

Strategically selecting Conservatives when making public appointments

Many of the most important public decisions in the UK are not made by government ministers, but by arms-length bodies. Ministers have little direct control over such bodies, but the principal power they do have is to appoint their leadership, typically including the chief executive, air and board members. Unfortunately, whilst Labour ministers typically appoint individuals who share their values, Conservative ministers have typically taken a more even-handed approach, meaning – as ConservativeHome has long recognised – Labour supporters are significantly over-represented in such positions.

Encouraging more applications is a good start; however, it is not sufficient. Conservative ministers must ensure that they actively select appointees who share conservative values. If necessary they must be willing to use their existing powers to overrule officials’ advice and insist either on reopening applications, or appointing an otherwise qualified individual.

I am not suggesting that every appointee must be a dyed-in-the-wool Tory. There are many excellent individuals for whom their political views, whatever they may be, do not significantly impact their professional outlook or decisions. There may also be some exceptions: foreign policy, for example, is an area where left and right often agree and which therefore may allow cross-party appointments, as illustrated in art by President Santos’s appointment of Arnold Vinick as Secretary of State, or in life by the superb recent appointment of Gisela Stuart as Chair of Wilton Park. But in the main, to hand over large swathes off our economic and social landscape to those who are open Labour supporters, active in the left-wing union movement, or otherwise opponents of conservatism does great harm to our cause.

Dismantle New Labour’s left-wing policy laws

One of Blair and Brown’s most insidious legacies is the number of laws that enshrine a left-wing bias in our policy making. Little known by the general public, and often included as part of otherwise worthwhile Acts, such clauses force civil servants to couch their advice in the language of the Left; not due to bias on their part, but through rightful, dutiful adherence to the law of the land.

The Human Rights Act’s commandment that ministers must consider the human rights implication of any Bill brought before Parliament; the ‘Public Sector Equality Duty’ in the (otherwise positive) Equalities Act; the so-called ‘fair access’ regime in university admissions; and the exclusion of the UK’s national interest from the International Development: these laws, amongst others, create a policy framework in which left-wing views find fertile fruit more readily than conservative ones. The systematic amendment of such Acts is a vital part of restoring the civil service’s ability to genuinely provide objective, impartial advice to ministers.

The commanding heights of society

When Tony Blair revised Clause IV of the Labour Party’s constitution, it was taken as a sign that he had renounced Marx’s instruction for the state to take control of the commanding heights of the economy. Not only was this judgement premature, as Corbyn’s return to fully-fledged socialism demonstrates, we overlooked the way the left was establishing its dominance across society. If the Conservative party is to thrive in the twenty-first century, we must act now to reclaim the commanding heights of society for conservatism.

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Immigration Services Commissioner – and more.

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

HS2 Ltd – Non-Executive Directors

“As Non-Executive Director, you will champion the HS2 vision and objectives, challenging Board decisions where appropriate to maintain the aspired strategic direction and culture of the organisation whilst holding the leadership team to account for effective and efficient delivery against the agreed strategy and business plan. This will include offering alternative perspectives to the sector norm, with the ability to consider strategic, complex and often sensitive issues from an informed and balanced perspective. You will need recent and relevant Executive Board or Non-Executive Director experience with the tenacity and interpersonal skills to operate in a high profile organisation tasked with delivering against demanding objectives.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £950 per diem.

Closes: 01 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Home Office – Immigration Services Commissioner

“A rare and exciting opportunity has arisen to become the new Commissioner of the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC). The OISC is an independent executive non-departmental public body with approximately 60 staff. The Commissioner is the head of the organisation and is appointed by the Home Secretary. The role of the OISC is to regulate individuals or organisations who provide immigration advice to members of the public and who are not practising lawyers and are therefore not regulated by another body. The primary way in which the OISC performs this function is by ensuring that these immigration advisers are registered with them and that action is taken against those who provide advice or services without being registered. The regulatory scheme applies to over 1500 organisations and over 3000 immigration advisers.”

Time: Three days per week.

Remuneration: £66,000 per annum.

Closes: 11 November

– – – – – – – – – –

British Transport Police Authority – Members

“Members of the BTPA play an active role in working towards ensuring that an effective and efficient police service is provided on the railways. Collectively, the BTPA will be accountable for the discharge of the responsibilities set out in the legislation. Members’ primary responsibility will be to the work of the BTPA as a whole rather than as a representative of any area from which they may come. In order to fulfil this role, the Secretary of State expects that a Member will be required to commit 30 days a year to BTPA business, although this may not necessarily arise in a regular pattern. Whilst the majority of the work will take place in Camden in London, where both the BTPA and BTP Force headquarters are based, there may be some requirement to travel to other parts of the country where the BTP operates.”

Time: 30 days per annum.

Remuneration: £16,497 per annum.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation

“The Chief Inspector has a duty to ensure the inspection of probation and youth offending services in England and Wales and provide independent scrutiny of the quality of work undertaken with individual offenders. Probation provision is currently delivered by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) which are subject to contract management oversight by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and the National Probation Service (NPS), which is directly line managed as part of HMPPS. HMI Probation is responsible for delivering and developing programmes of inspection and the inspection methodology or “framework” against which both probation services provision and Youth Offending Teams are inspected. The Chief Inspector is actively engaged in leading the day to day inspection process.”

Time: Full-time, three years.

Remuneration: £135,000 per annum, pensionable.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Health and Care Professions Council – Chair of Council

“We are seeking to appoint a Chair of Council. You will have experience of providing strong non-executive leadership and be able to uphold the principles of transparency and accountability in all of the HCPC’s activities. You will act as an ambassador for the HCPC, influencing and building effective relationships internally and externally with a range of senior level stakeholders, inspiring confidence in the organisation and promoting the organisation’s central commitment to public protection. The Chair of Council appointment is open to both Lay and Registrant candidates. The HCPC is committed to equality of opportunity and actively guards against unfair discrimination on any grounds (including sexual orientation, religion or beliefs, race, sex, age or disability). We are a UK-wide regulator and encourage applicants from all countries of the UK.”

Time: Three days per week approx.

Remuneration: £65,000 annual allowance.

Closes: 19 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Met Office – Non-Executive Directors

“The Met Office employs around 1900 people in sites across the UK and overseas. It operates as a Trading Fund, meaning that, whilst it is sponsored by HM Government, it self-funds through the services it provides to its diverse client base. The Met Office steering Board has a vital role in advising and supporting the Chief Executive and the Executive Team to deliver the organisation’s strategic priorities and ensuring that resources are allocated effectively for their delivery. The Board reviews the management and performance of the Met Office and ensures high standards of corporate governance are maintained… As a Non-Executive Director (NED) on the Met Office Board, you will have an important and demanding role and will provide a valuable external perspective to the organisation. This includes providing influence and access to networks which the organisation would otherwise not have.”

Time: 27 days per annum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 26 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 27 November