Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. CEO of the British Council – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Department for International Development – Independent Commissioner for Aid Impact

“A Board of Commissioners is being recruited to ICAI for a single four-year term from 2019. As a Commissioner you will use your professional expertise, experience and senior leadership skills to set the direction for ICAI’s work, ensuring it delivers high quality, impartial scrutiny of the impact and value for money of UK aid. You will work as part of teams to generate credible assessments of UK aid spending. You will work independently to hold Government to account, reporting directly to Parliament. A full information pack, along with supporting documentation, can be found at the foot of the advert. To be successful in this role you will need to demonstrate successful leadership within your specialism with extensive experience in international development and in at least one of evaluation, audit or finance contexts as well as an understanding of public policy.”

Time: 70 days per annum.

Remuneration: £381 per diem, plus expenses.

Closes: 23 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Civil Nuclear Police Authority – Independent Members

“The Civil Nuclear Police Authority (CNPA) is a body corporate established by the Energy Act 2004 and an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The CNPA has a statutory responsibility for maintaining an efficient and effective Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC). The CNC provides an armed response capability for the UK’s civil nuclear industry, operating from units based at licensed nuclear sites throughout the UK and providing armed escorts – road and marine – for movements of nuclear materials within the UK and overseas. The CNPA sets the strategic direction for the CNC and ensures that it’s policing meets the needs of the nuclear operating companies. This could mean denying unauthorised access to nuclear material or recovering control of nuclear material lost to unauthorised persons.”

Time: 35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £17,500 per annum.

Closes: 27 January

– – – – – – – – – –

UK Statistics Authority – Non-Executive Director

“The non-executive members of the Authority are responsible for: strategy: setting the overall strategic direction and vision of the Authority and its executive office, within the policy framework laid down in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007; governance: providing strong governance of the Authority’s executive office, ONS; working with executives: providing oversight, guidance and support to the National Statistician as the Chief Executive of the Authority, and the Director General for Regulation as the Authority’s principal adviser on the ongoing development and operation of the Authority’s assessment work; support and challenge: supporting and challenging the Government Statistical Service and ONS in delivering the Authority’s strategy; advocacy: acting as effective advocates and influential ambassadors for the UK Statistics Authority among key stakeholders;
Independence: ensuring that the Authority remains beyond reproach on the question of independence, and reports as necessary to Parliament and the devolved legislatures…”

Time: Two days per month minimum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 01 February

– – – – – – – – – –

The Housing Ombudsman Service – Housing Ombudsman

“The Housing Ombudsman delivers an essential service in providing redress for social housing residents, both tenants and leaseholders, and for private tenants where their landlords have chosen to join the scheme.  The Housing Ombudsman has a critical role to play in delivering an independent, fair and impartial service, improving complaint handling throughout the process, and in supporting and advising tenants, landlords, and designated persons to achieve quicker and more effective dispute resolution locally. This is a significant period for housing with the publication of the Social Housing Green Paper, Dame Judith Hackitt’s Review on Building Regulations and the Public Inquiry into the Grenfell Fire. Delivering effective redress has been identified as a key issue by social housing residents and is one of the main challenges the Government is taking forward through the Social Housing Green Paper. The Housing Ombudsman plays a key role in ensuring that tenants and leaseholders are able to have quick, appropriate and effective redress.”

Time: Full time.

Remuneration: £120,000 per annum.

Closes: 04 February

– – – – – – – – – –

British Council – Chief Executive Officer

“The British Council is seeking to appoint a truly exceptional individual to succeed Sir Ciarán Devane, who has served as Chief Executive with success and distinction for four years. Working with the Board of Trustees and Executive Board, the Chief Executive provides the British Council with the leadership, challenge and inspiration to meet its aspirations. The successful candidate will be driven by a sense of social mission and purpose. They will gain international recognition as an expert in cultural relations and will be at the forefront of the global relationship-building which enhances the British Council’s authority and presence and, through that, the profile of the whole of the UK. This is an incredibly exciting, stimulating and challenging post, requiring exceptional vision, energy, imagination and cultural sensitivity. As described above, the British Council, backed by Royal Charter, is an entrepreneurial public service with a strong purpose-driven ethos in all it does.”

Time: Full time.

Remuneration:  £150,000 per annum, plus bonus and pension.

Closes: 11 February

– – – – – – – – – –

Judicial Appointments Commission – Commissioners

“The JAC Commissioners – who are independent of government and the civil service – have the corporate responsibility for ensuring that the JAC fulfils its role under the 2005 Constitutional Reform Act so that recruitment to the judiciary is made on merit on the basis of fair and open competition. As an arm’s length body of the Ministry of Justice, Commissioners are accountable to Parliament through the Lord Chancellor… The main responsibilities of the Commissioners are to: maintain the values of the JAC, particularly selection on merit on the basis of fair and open competition; oversee a number of selection exercises ensuring that the most suitable candidates are recommended to the Lord Chancellor for appointment; take part in and influence debates about the strategic objectives, performance and constitutional role of the JAC; promote the JAC and to have regard to the need to encourage diversity in the range of persons available for selection.”

Time: ~28 days per annum.

Remuneration: £338 per diem.

Closes: 11 February

– – – – – – – – – –

Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) & Electricity Settlements Company (ESC) – Chair

“The LCCC delivers key elements of the Contracts for Difference (CFDs) scheme, established to incentivise investment in low carbon electricity generation.  In all its operations as the counterparty to CFDs, the LCCC is led by its principle of maintaining investor confidence in the scheme and to minimise costs to consumers. The role of the ESC is to maintain a healthy surplus of electricity capacity. It oversees settlement of the Capacity Market to ensure that regular payments are made to capacity providers who have agreed to provide capacity at times of system stress. In carrying out its activities ESC seeks to maintain participants confidence in the Capacity Market whilst minimising costs to consumers. LCCC and ESC are private limited companies wholly-owned by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The companies have day-to-day operational independence, subject to certain limited exceptions which require shareholder consent. The Boards of LCCC and ESC comprise the same members so we are seeking to appoint an individual to be Chair of both companies.”

Time: Two days per week.

Remuneration: £100,000 per annum plus expenses.

Closes: 18 February

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Housing Ombudsman – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Victims’ Commissioner

“The Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses (Victims’ Commissioner or the Commissioner) is a statutory role, established in legislation under the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 and amended by the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. The Secretary of State for Justice (Justice Secretary) is responsible for appointing the Commissioner and in doing so must consult the Attorney General and Home Secretary. The role is independent of government… The Commissioner may, for any purpose connected with the performance of their duties as above, make proposals to the Justice Secretary for amending the Victims’ Code (at the request of the Justice Secretary or on their own initiative); make a report to the Secretary of State; make recommendations to an authority within their remit and consult any person they think appropriate.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: £108,000 per annum.

Closes: 11 January

– – – – – – – – – –

UK Statistics Authority – Non-Executive Director

“The non-executive members of the Authority are responsible for: strategy: setting the overall strategic direction and vision of the Authority and its executive office, within the policy framework laid down in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007; governance: providing strong governance of the Authority’s executive office, ONS; working with executives: providing oversight, guidance and support to the National Statistician as the Chief Executive of the Authority, and the Director General for Regulation as the Authority’s principal adviser on the ongoing development and operation of the Authority’s assessment work; support and challenge: supporting and challenging the Government Statistical Service and ONS in delivering the Authority’s strategy; advocacy: acting as effective advocates and influential ambassadors for the UK Statistics Authority among key stakeholders;
Independence: ensuring that the Authority remains beyond reproach on the question of independence, and reports as necessary to Parliament and the devolved legislatures…”

Time: Two days per month minimum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 18 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Prison Service Pay Review Body – Chair

“As Chair of the Prison Service Pay Review Body you will have responsibility for working corporately with members to advise the Government annually on the pay of Governors, Operational Managers, Prison Officers and support grades in England and Wales and equivalent posts in Northern Ireland. The appointed individual should be available for Review Body duties from the end of May 2019. Candidates for the PSPRB post who are the Chair or members of other Review Bodies may apply, but would need to resign their current position if they were appointed. This role represents an influential, worthwhile and intellectually stimulating challenge. We are looking for a new Chair with senior management level experience, and a strategic/senior level understanding of unionised environments and employee relations. To help you decide if you have the qualities and skills required for this post, we have listed below the criteria that we will apply when assessing candidates.”

Time: ~35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £350 per diem

Closes: 21 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Department for International Development – Independent Commissioner for Aid Impact

“A Board of Commissioners is being recruited to ICAI for a single four-year term from 2019. As a Commissioner you will use your professional expertise, experience and senior leadership skills to set the direction for ICAI’s work, ensuring it delivers high quality, impartial scrutiny of the impact and value for money of UK aid. You will work as part of teams to generate credible assessments of UK aid spending. You will work independently to hold Government to account, reporting directly to Parliament. A full information pack, along with supporting documentation, can be found at the foot of the advert. To be successful in this role you will need to demonstrate successful leadership within your specialism with extensive experience in international development and in at least one of evaluation, audit or finance contexts as well as an understanding of public policy.”

Time: 70 days per annum.

Remuneration: £381 per diem, plus expenses.

Closes: 23 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Civil Nuclear Police Authority – Independent Members

“The Civil Nuclear Police Authority (CNPA) is a body corporate established by the Energy Act 2004 and an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The CNPA has a statutory responsibility for maintaining an efficient and effective Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC). The CNC provides an armed response capability for the UK’s civil nuclear industry, operating from units based at licensed nuclear sites throughout the UK and providing armed escorts – road and marine – for movements of nuclear materials within the UK and overseas. The CNPA sets the strategic direction for the CNC and ensures that it’s policing meets the needs of the nuclear operating companies. This could mean denying unauthorised access to nuclear material or recovering control of nuclear material lost to unauthorised persons.”

Time: 35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £17,500 per annum.

Closes: 27 January

– – – – – – – – – –

The Housing Ombudsman Service – Housing Ombudsman

“The Housing Ombudsman delivers an essential service in providing redress for social housing residents, both tenants and leaseholders, and for private tenants where their landlords have chosen to join the scheme.  The Housing Ombudsman has a critical role to play in delivering an independent, fair and impartial service, improving complaint handling throughout the process, and in supporting and advising tenants, landlords, and designated persons to achieve quicker and more effective dispute resolution locally. This is a significant period for housing with the publication of the Social Housing Green Paper, Dame Judith Hackitt’s Review on Building Regulations and the Public Inquiry into the Grenfell Fire. Delivering effective redress has been identified as a key issue by social housing residents and is one of the main challenges the Government is taking forward through the Social Housing Green Paper. The Housing Ombudsman plays a key role in ensuring that tenants and leaseholders are able to have quick, appropriate and effective redress.”

Time: Full time

Remuneration: £120,000 per annum.

Closes: 04 February

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Chair of the Consumer Council for Water – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Consumer Council for Water – Chair

“The Chair has the following leadership responsibilities: lead on formulation of the Council’s strategy; leading the board in its relationship with the Executive, providing support but constructively challenging where necessary; acting as the public face of CCWater to raise its profile not only with consumers but also policy makers and government; campaigning on behalf of consumers and championing their views to Ofwat, policy makers and Government; ensuring that the board, in reaching decisions, takes proper account of guidance provided by Welsh ministers and/or the Secretary of State of appropriate departments; promoting the efficient and effective use of staff and other resources; and delivering high standards of regularity and propriety.”

Time: Two days per week.

Remuneration: £33,280 per annum.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Home Office – Designate Commissioner for Domestic Abuse

“Domestic abuse is a terrible crime. Two million adults a year experience it, yet it remains largely hidden, as most victims do not speak to the police or other public bodies. And when they do the quality of the services which they receive will vary significantly according to where they live. Transforming the response to domestic abuse is a key priority for the Government, so we are establishing a Designate Domestic Abuse Commissioner, which will offer a unique opportunity to make a huge difference to victims and survivors of domestic abuse across England and Wales. The post holder will provide public leadership on issues of domestic abuse, ensure that the voices of victims and survivors are heard, and drive real improvements in the provision of services.”

Time: 2-3 days per week.

Remuneration: £108,000-140,000 per annum pro rata.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Victims’ Commissioner

“The Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses (Victims’ Commissioner or the Commissioner) is a statutory role, established in legislation under the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 and amended by the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. The Secretary of State for Justice (Justice Secretary) is responsible for appointing the Commissioner and in doing so must consult the Attorney General and Home Secretary. The role is independent of government… The Commissioner may, for any purpose connected with the performance of their duties as above, make proposals to the Justice Secretary for amending the Victims’ Code (at the request of the Justice Secretary or on their own initiative); make a report to the Secretary of State; make recommendations to an authority within their remit and consult any person they think appropriate.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: £108,000 per annum.

Closes: 11 January

– – – – – – – – – –

UK Statistics Authority – Non-Executive Director

“The non-executive members of the Authority are responsible for: strategy: setting the overall strategic direction and vision of the Authority and its executive office, within the policy framework laid down in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007; governance: providing strong governance of the Authority’s executive office, ONS; working with executives: providing oversight, guidance and support to the National Statistician as the Chief Executive of the Authority, and the Director General for Regulation as the Authority’s principal adviser on the ongoing development and operation of the Authority’s assessment work; support and challenge: supporting and challenging the Government Statistical Service and ONS in delivering the Authority’s strategy; advocacy: acting as effective advocates and influential ambassadors for the UK Statistics Authority among key stakeholders;
Independence: ensuring that the Authority remains beyond reproach on the question of independence, and reports as necessary to Parliament and the devolved legislatures…”

Time: Two days per month minimum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 18 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Prison Service Pay Review Body – Chair

“As Chair of the Prison Service Pay Review Body you will have responsibility for working corporately with members to advise the Government annually on the pay of Governors, Operational Managers, Prison Officers and support grades in England and Wales and equivalent posts in Northern Ireland. The appointed individual should be available for Review Body duties from the end of May 2019. Candidates for the PSPRB post who are the Chair or members of other Review Bodies may apply, but would need to resign their current position if they were appointed. This role represents an influential, worthwhile and intellectually stimulating challenge. We are looking for a new Chair with senior management level experience, and a strategic/senior level understanding of unionised environments and employee relations. To help you decide if you have the qualities and skills required for this post, we have listed below the criteria that we will apply when assessing candidates.”

Time: ~35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £350 per diem

Closes: 21 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Department for International Development – Independent Commissioner for Aid Impact

“A Board of Commissioners is being recruited to ICAI for a single four-year term from 2019. As a Commissioner you will use your professional expertise, experience and senior leadership skills to set the direction for ICAI’s work, ensuring it delivers high quality, impartial scrutiny of the impact and value for money of UK aid. You will work as part of teams to generate credible assessments of UK aid spending. You will work independently to hold Government to account, reporting directly to Parliament. A full information pack, along with supporting documentation, can be found at the foot of the advert. To be successful in this role you will need to demonstrate successful leadership within your specialism with extensive experience in international development and in at least one of evaluation, audit or finance contexts as well as an understanding of public policy.”

Time: 70 days per annum.

Remuneration: £381 per diem, plus expenses.

Closes: 23 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Civil Nuclear Police Authority – Independent Members

“The Civil Nuclear Police Authority (CNPA) is a body corporate established by the Energy Act 2004 and an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The CNPA has a statutory responsibility for maintaining an efficient and effective Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC). The CNC provides an armed response capability for the UK’s civil nuclear industry, operating from units based at licensed nuclear sites throughout the UK and providing armed escorts – road and marine – for movements of nuclear materials within the UK and overseas. The CNPA sets the strategic direction for the CNC and ensures that it’s policing meets the needs of the nuclear operating companies. This could mean denying unauthorised access to nuclear material or recovering control of nuclear material lost to unauthorised persons.”

Time: 35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £17,500 per annum.

Closes: 27 January

Andy Street: In the West Midlands, inclusion is more than a buzzword. It’s turning our diversity into a strength.

It is a sad and all-too-obvious fact that most of the decision makers I meet in my role as Mayor are people who look like me.

Andy Street is Mayor of the West Midlands, and is a former Managing Director of John Lewis.

Diversity defines modern Britain. I have often written about Urban Conservatism and the new brand of politics we are pioneering in the West Midlands. This new approach is about inclusivity and opportunity for a young and diverse population, and I have tried to be a Mayor who represents everyone – all places, faiths, ethnicities, genders, sexualities and (dis)abilities.

But if the message of Urban Conservatism is to resonate, we have to ensure that inclusivity not only means reaching out to the communities that make up modern Britain, but that they are represented in all walks of life and at all levels.

It is a sad and all-too-obvious fact that most of the decision makers I meet in my role as Mayor are people who look like me. I could not and still can’t fully understand why the demographics of this incredibly diverse region are not reflected in its leadership. Like elsewhere, the region is made up of 50 per cent women and 20 per cent people with disabilities (or with a long-term illness).

But it’s the ethnic diversity which makes it special. We say this is a place where you can see the whole world in seven boroughs. Birmingham’s population is 58 per cent white, with 27 per cent of our residents being of Asian descent and nine per cent Black. In neighbouring Coventry, two thirds identify as White British, a statistic that is broadly reflected across the rest of the conurbation. Birmingham is soon going to be a ‘majority-minority’ city – but this is not obvious when you look at the make-up of decision-makers in the City region.

So in September last year I launched the Leadership Commission, made up of independent commissioners and chaired by Anita Bhalla, which aimed to understand why the wider leadership of our region is not more representative of the people it serves. Its report, compiled by researchers at the University of Birmingham and other seats of learning across the region, reinforced our understanding of many longstanding issues and made clear recommendations for action.

It found that women are better represented in leadership roles in the public sector than in the private sector, where they are significantly under-represented, and that people from black and ethnic minority groups are under-represented in senior leadership positions both in education and the private sector. The evidence also highlighted how disabled employees are under-represented in professional roles in the public sector, but not the private sector in the West Midlands.

Responding to the recommendations to deal with the clear imbalances that have been highlighted we now have a clear implementation plan which starts with the business community.

Many businesses recognise the need to connect with communities on a broad level, not only because there is a business case for inclusivity, but because it is the right thing to do. Slowly but surely, I sense that the dials are changing, and the “Inclusive Leaders’ Forum” has come together. It is committed to improving the diversity of leadership in their organisations through better recruitment, retention and promotion. Members include local councils, the NHS, big employers like PwC, KPMG, universities and major retailers like Selfridges along with SMEs and microbusinesses. In January we will be launching an ambitious drive to recruit a thousand more organisations in the West Midlands to the forum.

The Government is also playing its part in promoting inclusivity. Work to better understand the Gender Pay Gap – with 10,000 of the UK’s larger companies providing details of their employees’ pay – is a major step forward in enabling senior decision makers to do things differently. I have no doubt the Race Pay Gap will highlight the same kinds of inequalities in our workplaces, and be equally impactful in driving action.

Similarly the Government is committed to greater diversity in Public Appointments. A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of welcoming the Minister for Implementation, Oliver Dowden, to Birmingham, for the first roadshow aimed at encouraging a more diverse pool of applicants for public roles. We will now work with the Cabinet Office on those practical skills needed for the application and interview process, and providing guidance for public appointees. It is only by providing transparency in our processes that we will see people who are less likely to take part in civic activities take that first step and engage. Crucially, we also have to drum up confidence about taking that step into public roles.

A key asset in addressing all these issues in the West Midlands is the strength of faith organisations and faith-related activity in the region. Therefore one of my first commitments after becoming Mayor was to convene a group of faith leaders and ask them to design the Mayor and Faith Conference. The conference took place in November last year, and brought together 400 different faith organisations at the Great Hall of the University of Birmingham. It was a day of optimism and exploring how faith groups could work together on homelessness, leadership, hate crime and economic growth. The conclusion was obvious – the faith communities are a powerful part of our collective leadership. We have since created an Action Plan, and are working through all the good ideas that came out of the conference.

As Mayor of this diverse region, I am committed to visiting places of worship and understanding more about the rich fabric of faith which is so important to the residents of the West Midlands. I recently had the pleasure of visiting the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, which is most important pilgrimage site of Sikhism. This visit allowed me to build on all I have learnt from the gurdwaras into which I have been welcomed across the region. Iftars are already in the diary for next Ramadan, and this festive season I have been meeting the Jewish community for Hannukah and visiting various churches in their preparations for Christmas. Diwali is also a big deal for my office, with Birmingham’s Victoria Square annually being transformed into an Indian celebration of the festival of light.

The lesson of all this involvement is clear – that each faith deserves to be respected in its own right. Each gives morality and purpose to its own community. But each faith also teaches respect and tolerance for every other community. It is through understanding such common values that our society as a whole can thrive – and in a sense the West Midlands is the exemplar of that.

Urban Conservatism’s message of hope, opportunity and progress resonates with all communities – and we now need to show that we are serious about truly representing the people in them. Although there is so much still to do, we are starting to change the way our Party is viewed in traditional Labour areas. Labour do not and should not have a monopoly on votes from certain communities.

In the West Midlands, we are ensuring that inclusion is more than a ‘buzzword’ – it’s an approach that is turning our diversity into a strength.

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Independent Commissioner for Aid Impact – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

The Crown Estate – Chief Executive Officer

“The Crown Estate is a £14bn UK real estate business with a portfolio unlike any other. It includes some of central London’s best places to work, shop and visit as well as brilliant destinations across the country (including retail assets and Windsor Great Park). We also have a substantial rural and coastal portfolio, and play an active role in the UK’s world-leading offshore wind sector. We actively manage our portfolio to deliver strong returns for the nation’s finances, contributing over £2.7bn in the last 10 years. We take a long term view, working alongside our customers, partners and communities to create great experiences. We call this creating brilliant places through conscious commercialism. The Crown Estate is seeking a new Chief Executive who will lead the continuing transformation of our business. We are moving from a “bricks and mortar” model to one that delivers services and experiences to build deep relationships with customers and community, delivering value for all our stakeholders, and seizing the opportunities that demographic, social and technology trends create.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: “Remuneration commensurate with the role and responsibilities”.

Closes: 17 December

– – – – – – – – – –

British Business Bank – Non-Executive Director

“The UK Government established the British Business Bank (BBB) in 2014. The British Business Bank is 100% Government owned, but independently managed. It brings expertise and Government money to the smaller business finance markets. The Bank doesn’t lend or invest directly. Instead it works with over 100 partners such as banks, leasing companies, venture capital funds and web-based platforms. Businesses apply for finance through its partners who, because they work with the Bank, can lend and invest more, especially to younger and faster growing companies. In total the Bank works through more than 100 finance partners in the market, and will unlock up to £10 billion of new finance and bring greater choice and information on finance options to smaller businesses… Board members promote the highest standards of corporate governance with the personal credibility and presence to engage, as needed, with Ministers and senior Government and business stakeholders. This is a collaborative Board with a constructive approach and a strong belief in the Bank’s mission.”

Time: Approx. 20 days per annum.

Remuneration: £25,000 per annum.

Closes: 18 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Construction Industry Training Board – Trustee

“CITB is the statutory skills body for the construction industry in Great Britain and its purpose is to make better provision for the training and maintenance of skills in the industry. CITB raises around £200m annually via a training levy, and works closely with employers and the Government to ensure national construction skills needs are met. CITB seeks to create the culture and conditions that will deliver new ways of working, embracing new technologies, creating a demand in construction for more skills, new skills and higher-level skills. CITB aspires to be at the forefront of effective commissioning and grant practice and is undertaking a high-profile transformational reform programme in order to achieve this… Trustees will bring their specific knowledge and expertise to the Board. They seek to deliver the statutory functions of the Board in the best interests of the Construction Industry as a whole and must make decisions independent of any affiliation to their own business or sector interests.”

Time: ~Two days per month.

Remuneration: None.

Closes: 20 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Consumer Council for Water – Chair

“The Chair has the following leadership responsibilities: lead on formulation of the Council’s strategy; leading the board in its relationship with the Executive, providing support but constructively challenging where necessary; acting as the public face of CCWater to raise its profile not only with consumers but also policy makers and government; campaigning on behalf of consumers and championing their views to Ofwat, policy makers and Government; ensuring that the board, in reaching decisions, takes proper account of guidance provided by Welsh ministers and/or the Secretary of State of appropriate departments; promoting the efficient and effective use of staff and other resources; and delivering high standards of regularity and propriety.”

Time: Two days per week.

Remuneration: £33,280 per annum.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Home Office – Designate Commissioner for Domestic Abuse

“Domestic abuse is a terrible crime. Two million adults a year experience it, yet it remains largely hidden, as most victims do not speak to the police or other public bodies. And when they do the quality of the services which they receive will vary significantly according to where they live. Transforming the response to domestic abuse is a key priority for the Government, so we are establishing a Designate Domestic Abuse Commissioner, which will offer a unique opportunity to make a huge difference to victims and survivors of domestic abuse across England and Wales. The post holder will provide public leadership on issues of domestic abuse, ensure that the voices of victims and survivors are heard, and drive real improvements in the provision of services.”

Time: 2-3 days per week.

Remuneration: £108,000-140,000 per annum pro rata.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Victims’ Commissioner

“The Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses (Victims’ Commissioner or the Commissioner) is a statutory role, established in legislation under the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 and amended by the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. The Secretary of State for Justice (Justice Secretary) is responsible for appointing the Commissioner and in doing so must consult the Attorney General and Home Secretary. The role is independent of government… The Commissioner may, for any purpose connected with the performance of their duties as above, make proposals to the Justice Secretary for amending the Victims’ Code (at the request of the Justice Secretary or on their own initiative); make a report to the Secretary of State; make recommendations to an authority within their remit and consult any person they think appropriate.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: £108,000 per annum.

Closes: 11 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Department for International Development – Independent Commissioner for Aid Impact

“A Board of Commissioners is being recruited to ICAI for a single four-year term from 2019. As a Commissioner you will use your professional expertise, experience and senior leadership skills to set the direction for ICAI’s work, ensuring it delivers high quality, impartial scrutiny of the impact and value for money of UK aid. You will work as part of teams to generate credible assessments of UK aid spending. You will work independently to hold Government to account, reporting directly to Parliament. A full information pack, along with supporting documentation, can be found at the foot of the advert. To be successful in this role you will need to demonstrate successful leadership within your specialism with extensive experience in international development and in at least one of evaluation, audit or finance contexts as well as an understanding of public policy.”

Time: 70 days per annum.

Remuneration: £381 per diem, plus expenses.

Closes: 23 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Civil Nuclear Police Authority – Independent Members

“The Civil Nuclear Police Authority (CNPA) is a body corporate established by the Energy Act 2004 and an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The CNPA has a statutory responsibility for maintaining an efficient and effective Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC). The CNC provides an armed response capability for the UK’s civil nuclear industry, operating from units based at licensed nuclear sites throughout the UK and providing armed escorts – road and marine – for movements of nuclear materials within the UK and overseas. The CNPA sets the strategic direction for the CNC and ensures that it’s policing meets the needs of the nuclear operating companies. This could mean denying unauthorised access to nuclear material or recovering control of nuclear material lost to unauthorised persons.”

Time: 35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £17,500 per annum.

Closes: 27 January

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Victims’ Commissioner – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

NHS Pension Board – Chair

“Ministers are seeking to appoint the Chair of the NHS Pension Board. They are looking to appoint a candidate with a strong working knowledge of public and private sector pension schemes. The successful candidate should have good communication skills and be able to devise strategies to promote the value of the scheme as part of the NHS total reward offer, maximising its impact as a recruitment and retention lever. Candidates should be able to understand and utilise the potential of technology to improve the efficiency of scheme administration and create value for employers… The Chair of the NHS Pension Board is appointed by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, who is responsible for the NHS Pension Scheme, and is accountable to the Secretary of State via a senior Departmental official for carrying out their duties and for their performance.”

Time: Up to three days per month.

Remuneration: £13,137 per annum.

Closes: 11 December

– – – – – – – – – –

The Crown Estate – Chief Executive Officer

“The Crown Estate is a £14bn UK real estate business with a portfolio unlike any other. It includes some of central London’s best places to work, shop and visit as well as brilliant destinations across the country (including retail assets and Windsor Great Park). We also have a substantial rural and coastal portfolio, and play an active role in the UK’s world-leading offshore wind sector. We actively manage our portfolio to deliver strong returns for the nation’s finances, contributing over £2.7bn in the last 10 years. We take a long term view, working alongside our customers, partners and communities to create great experiences. We call this creating brilliant places through conscious commercialism. The Crown Estate is seeking a new Chief Executive who will lead the continuing transformation of our business. We are moving from a “bricks and mortar” model to one that delivers services and experiences to build deep relationships with customers and community, delivering value for all our stakeholders, and seizing the opportunities that demographic, social and technology trends create.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: “Remuneration commensurate with the role and responsibilities”.

Closes: 14 December

– – – – – – – – – –

British Business Bank – Non-Executive Director

“The UK Government established the British Business Bank (BBB) in 2014. The British Business Bank is 100% Government owned, but independently managed. It brings expertise and Government money to the smaller business finance markets. The Bank doesn’t lend or invest directly. Instead it works with over 100 partners such as banks, leasing companies, venture capital funds and web-based platforms. Businesses apply for finance through its partners who, because they work with the Bank, can lend and invest more, especially to younger and faster growing companies. In total the Bank works through more than 100 finance partners in the market, and will unlock up to £10 billion of new finance and bring greater choice and information on finance options to smaller businesses… Board members promote the highest standards of corporate governance with the personal credibility and presence to engage, as needed, with Ministers and senior Government and business stakeholders. This is a collaborative Board with a constructive approach and a strong belief in the Bank’s mission.”

Time: Approx. 20 days per annum.

Remuneration: £25,000 per annum.

Closes: 18 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Construction Industry Training Board – Trustee

“CITB is the statutory skills body for the construction industry in Great Britain and its purpose is to make better provision for the training and maintenance of skills in the industry. CITB raises around £200m annually via a training levy, and works closely with employers and the Government to ensure national construction skills needs are met. CITB seeks to create the culture and conditions that will deliver new ways of working, embracing new technologies, creating a demand in construction for more skills, new skills and higher-level skills. CITB aspires to be at the forefront of effective commissioning and grant practice and is undertaking a high-profile transformational reform programme in order to achieve this… Trustees will bring their specific knowledge and expertise to the Board. They seek to deliver the statutory functions of the Board in the best interests of the Construction Industry as a whole and must make decisions independent of any affiliation to their own business or sector interests.”

Time: ~Two days per month.

Remuneration: None.

Closes: 20 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Consumer Council for Water – Chair

“The Chair has the following leadership responsibilities: lead on formulation of the Council’s strategy; leading the board in its relationship with the Executive, providing support but constructively challenging where necessary; acting as the public face of CCWater to raise its profile not only with consumers but also policy makers and government; campaigning on behalf of consumers and championing their views to Ofwat, policy makers and Government; ensuring that the board, in reaching decisions, takes proper account of guidance provided by Welsh ministers and/or the Secretary of State of appropriate departments; promoting the efficient and effective use of staff and other resources; and delivering high standards of regularity and propriety.”

Time: Two days per week.

Remuneration: £33,280 per annum.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Home Office – Designate Commissioner for Domestic Abuse

“Domestic abuse is a terrible crime. Two million adults a year experience it, yet it remains largely hidden, as most victims do not speak to the police or other public bodies. And when they do the quality of the services which they receive will vary significantly according to where they live. Transforming the response to domestic abuse is a key priority for the Government, so we are establishing a Designate Domestic Abuse Commissioner, which will offer a unique opportunity to make a huge difference to victims and survivors of domestic abuse across England and Wales. The post holder will provide public leadership on issues of domestic abuse, ensure that the voices of victims and survivors are heard, and drive real improvements in the provision of services.”

Time: 2-3 days per week.

Remuneration: £108,000-140,000 per annum pro rata.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Victims’ Commissioner

“The Commissioner for Victims and Witnesses (Victims’ Commissioner or the Commissioner) is a statutory role, established in legislation under the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 and amended by the Coroners and Justice Act 2009. The Secretary of State for Justice (Justice Secretary) is responsible for appointing the Commissioner and in doing so must consult the Attorney General and Home Secretary. The role is independent of government… The Commissioner may, for any purpose connected with the performance of their duties as above, make proposals to the Justice Secretary for amending the Victims’ Code (at the request of the Justice Secretary or on their own initiative); make a report to the Secretary of State; make recommendations to an authority within their remit and consult any person they think appropriate.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: £108,000 per annum.

Closes: 11 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Civil Nuclear Police Authority – Independent Members

“The Civil Nuclear Police Authority (CNPA) is a body corporate established by the Energy Act 2004 and an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The CNPA has a statutory responsibility for maintaining an efficient and effective Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC). The CNC provides an armed response capability for the UK’s civil nuclear industry, operating from units based at licensed nuclear sites throughout the UK and providing armed escorts – road and marine – for movements of nuclear materials within the UK and overseas. The CNPA sets the strategic direction for the CNC and ensures that it’s policing meets the needs of the nuclear operating companies. This could mean denying unauthorised access to nuclear material or recovering control of nuclear material lost to unauthorised persons.”

Time: 35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £17,500 per annum.

Closes: 27 January

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. CEO of the Crown Estate – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 04 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Committee on Fuel Poverty – Member

“The Committee on Fuel Poverty (CFP) advises the Government on the effectiveness of policies aimed at reducing fuel poverty to help keep UK residents warm and improve energy efficiency in their homes. It also persuades greater co-ordination across organisations working to reduce fuel poverty in the UK… The responsibilities of the new Members will include monitoring and reporting on progress towards the Government’s 2030 fuel poverty target and interim milestones, supporting and challenging the Government on its delivery approach, and encouraging a partnership approach between and within Government and stakeholders in tackling fuel poverty.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £8400 per annum plus reasonable travel and subsistence.

Closes: 06 December

– – – – – – – – – –

NHS Pension Board – Chair

“Ministers are seeking to appoint the Chair of the NHS Pension Board. They are looking to appoint a candidate with a strong working knowledge of public and private sector pension schemes. The successful candidate should have good communication skills and be able to devise strategies to promote the value of the scheme as part of the NHS total reward offer, maximising its impact as a recruitment and retention lever. Candidates should be able to understand and utilise the potential of technology to improve the efficiency of scheme administration and create value for employers… The Chair of the NHS Pension Board is appointed by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, who is responsible for the NHS Pension Scheme, and is accountable to the Secretary of State via a senior Departmental official for carrying out their duties and for their performance.”

Time: Up to three days per month.

Remuneration: £13,137 per annum.

Closes: 11 December

– – – – – – – – – –

The Crown Estate – Chief Executive Officer

“The Crown Estate is a £14bn UK real estate business with a portfolio unlike any other. It includes some of central London’s best places to work, shop and visit as well as brilliant destinations across the country (including retail assets and Windsor Great Park). We also have a substantial rural and coastal portfolio, and play an active role in the UK’s world-leading offshore wind sector. We actively manage our portfolio to deliver strong returns for the nation’s finances, contributing over £2.7bn in the last 10 years. We take a long term view, working alongside our customers, partners and communities to create great experiences. We call this creating brilliant places through conscious commercialism. The Crown Estate is seeking a new Chief Executive who will lead the continuing transformation of our business. We are moving from a “bricks and mortar” model to one that delivers services and experiences to build deep relationships with customers and community, delivering value for all our stakeholders, and seizing the opportunities that demographic, social and technology trends create.”

Time: Full-time.

Remuneration: “Remuneration commensurate with the role and responsibilities”.

Closes: 14 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Construction Industry Training Board – Trustee

“CITB is the statutory skills body for the construction industry in Great Britain and its purpose is to make better provision for the training and maintenance of skills in the industry. CITB raises around £200m annually via a training levy, and works closely with employers and the Government to ensure national construction skills needs are met. CITB seeks to create the culture and conditions that will deliver new ways of working, embracing new technologies, creating a demand in construction for more skills, new skills and higher-level skills. CITB aspires to be at the forefront of effective commissioning and grant practice and is undertaking a high-profile transformational reform programme in order to achieve this… Trustees will bring their specific knowledge and expertise to the Board. They seek to deliver the statutory functions of the Board in the best interests of the Construction Industry as a whole and must make decisions independent of any affiliation to their own business or sector interests.”

Time: ~Two days per month.

Remuneration: None.

Closes: 20 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Consumer Council for Water – Chair

“The Chair has the following leadership responsibilities: lead on formulation of the Council’s strategy; leading the board in its relationship with the Executive, providing support but constructively challenging where necessary; acting as the public face of CCWater to raise its profile not only with consumers but also policy makers and government; campaigning on behalf of consumers and championing their views to Ofwat, policy makers and Government; ensuring that the board, in reaching decisions, takes proper account of guidance provided by Welsh ministers and/or the Secretary of State of appropriate departments; promoting the efficient and effective use of staff and other resources; and delivering high standards of regularity and propriety.”

Time: Two days per week.

Remuneration: £33,280 per annum.

Closes: 07 January

– – – – – – – – – –

Civil Nuclear Police Authority – Independent Members

“The Civil Nuclear Police Authority (CNPA) is a body corporate established by the Energy Act 2004 and an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) of the Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The CNPA has a statutory responsibility for maintaining an efficient and effective Civil Nuclear Constabulary (CNC). The CNC provides an armed response capability for the UK’s civil nuclear industry, operating from units based at licensed nuclear sites throughout the UK and providing armed escorts – road and marine – for movements of nuclear materials within the UK and overseas. The CNPA sets the strategic direction for the CNC and ensures that it’s policing meets the needs of the nuclear operating companies. This could mean denying unauthorised access to nuclear material or recovering control of nuclear material lost to unauthorised persons.”

Time: 35 days per annum.

Remuneration: £17,500 per annum.

Closes: 27 January

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Chair of the NHS Pension Board – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 27 November

– – – – – – – – – –

British Library – Board Members

“In 2023, the British Library will mark its 50th anniversary as the national library of the United Kingdom and, in Living Knowledge (published in 2015), the Library has set out an ambitious vision for growth, innovation and development as that landmark date approaches. Major developments under way include projects to digitise and make globally available its most important historic collections; to refresh and transform its service to researchers, online and on-site; to widen its reach and presence for people across the UK, including new partnerships with public libraries; to extend and enhance its Grade 1-listed building in St Pancras, London, as part of a major development partnership; and – over the longer term – to renew and improve its 43-acre campus at Boston Spa in Yorkshire, where the majority of the collection is now held… Members of the Board have corporate responsibility for ensuring that the British Library complies with any statutory or administrative requirements for the use of public funds. ”

Time: 1-2 days per month, four-year term.

Remuneration: £9130 per annum.

Closes: 03 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Committee on Fuel Poverty – Member

“The Committee on Fuel Poverty (CFP) advises the Government on the effectiveness of policies aimed at reducing fuel poverty to help keep UK residents warm and improve energy efficiency in their homes. It also persuades greater co-ordination across organisations working to reduce fuel poverty in the UK… The responsibilities of the new Members will include monitoring and reporting on progress towards the Government’s 2030 fuel poverty target and interim milestones, supporting and challenging the Government on its delivery approach, and encouraging a partnership approach between and within Government and stakeholders in tackling fuel poverty.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £8400 per annum plus reasonable travel and subsistence.

Closes: 06 December

– – – – – – – – – –

NHS Pension Board – Chair

“Ministers are seeking to appoint the Chair of the NHS Pension Board. They are looking to appoint a candidate with a strong working knowledge of public and private sector pension schemes. The successful candidate should have good communication skills and be able to devise strategies to promote the value of the scheme as part of the NHS total reward offer, maximising its impact as a recruitment and retention lever. Candidates should be able to understand and utilise the potential of technology to improve the efficiency of scheme administration and create value for employers… The Chair of the NHS Pension Board is appointed by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, who is responsible for the NHS Pension Scheme, and is accountable to the Secretary of State via a senior Departmental official for carrying out their duties and for their performance.”

Time: Up to three days per month.

Remuneration: £13,137 per annum.

Closes: 11 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Construction Industry Training Board – Trustee

“CITB is the statutory skills body for the construction industry in Great Britain and its purpose is to make better provision for the training and maintenance of skills in the industry. CITB raises around £200m annually via a training levy, and works closely with employers and the Government to ensure national construction skills needs are met. CITB seeks to create the culture and conditions that will deliver new ways of working, embracing new technologies, creating a demand in construction for more skills, new skills and higher-level skills. CITB aspires to be at the forefront of effective commissioning and grant practice and is undertaking a high-profile transformational reform programme in order to achieve this… Trustees will bring their specific knowledge and expertise to the Board. They seek to deliver the statutory functions of the Board in the best interests of the Construction Industry as a whole and must make decisions independent of any affiliation to their own business or sector interests.”

Time: ~Two days per month.

Remuneration: None.

Closes: 20 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Consumer Council for Water – Chair

“The Chair has the following leadership responsibilities: lead on formulation of the Council’s strategy; leading the board in its relationship with the Executive, providing support but constructively challenging where necessary; acting as the public face of CCWater to raise its profile not only with consumers but also policy makers and government; campaigning on behalf of consumers and championing their views to Ofwat, policy makers and Government; ensuring that the board, in reaching decisions, takes proper account of guidance provided by Welsh ministers and/or the Secretary of State of appropriate departments; promoting the efficient and effective use of staff and other resources; and delivering high standards of regularity and propriety.”

Time: Two days per week.

Remuneration: £33,280 per annum.

Closes: 07 January

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Chair of Sheffield City Region – and more

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

Health and Care Professions Council – Chair of Council

“We are seeking to appoint a Chair of Council. You will have experience of providing strong non-executive leadership and be able to uphold the principles of transparency and accountability in all of the HCPC’s activities. You will act as an ambassador for the HCPC, influencing and building effective relationships internally and externally with a range of senior level stakeholders, inspiring confidence in the organisation and promoting the organisation’s central commitment to public protection. The Chair of Council appointment is open to both Lay and Registrant candidates. The HCPC is committed to equality of opportunity and actively guards against unfair discrimination on any grounds (including sexual orientation, religion or beliefs, race, sex, age or disability). We are a UK-wide regulator and encourage applicants from all countries of the UK.”

Time: Three days per week approx.

Remuneration: £65,000 annual allowance.

Closes: 19 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Sheffield City Region – Chair

“The Sheffield City Region (SCR) comprises the Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) and the Mayoral Combined Authority. Covering nine local authority districts, the City Region is home to 1.8 million residents with an annual economic output of over £34bn and over 68,000 businesses. We are a core part of the Northern Powerhouse and a key driver of economic growth within the North. We are an enterprising and business-focused City Region with a reputation for delivery. Our strong private – public partnership is founded on good governance and collaboration. Together, we are building a thriving, super-connected and successful economy. Our ambitious vision to develop a Global Innovation Corridor as an incubator of industry and talent, is firmly rooted in our strengths in advanced manufacturing and engineering. Raising the profile of the Global Innovation Corridor is a key priority for the LEP.”

Time: 4-5 days per month.

Remuneration: “Reasonable expenses”.

Closes: 23 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Security Vetting Appeals Panel – Chair

“The Security Vetting Appeals Panel is a Non-Departmental Public Body (NDPB) with advisory functions, sponsored by the Cabinet Office, established in July 1997. It hears appeals against the refusal or withdrawal of national security vetting clearance and is available to all those in the public and private sectors and in the Armed Forces who have exhausted internal appeal processes and remain dissatisfied with the outcome. The Panel is a quasi-judicial body and comprises a Chair, a Deputy Chair and eight lay Members. Due to the nature of the Panel’s work, the Chair and Deputy Chair positions require them to have current or recent senior judicial experience (usually at High Court or Appeal Court level). The Panel conducts hearings and makes non-binding recommendations to Heads of Organisations (or equivalent). Cases are normally heard by a panel of three, consisting of the Chair or Deputy Chair supported by two lay Members. The Panel is supported by a small Secretariat in the Cabinet Office.”

Time: 15-20 days per annum.

Remuneration: £240 per diem plus travel and subsistence.

Closes: 25 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Met Office – Non-Executive Directors

“The Met Office employs around 1900 people in sites across the UK and overseas. It operates as a Trading Fund, meaning that, whilst it is sponsored by HM Government, it self-funds through the services it provides to its diverse client base. The Met Office steering Board has a vital role in advising and supporting the Chief Executive and the Executive Team to deliver the organisation’s strategic priorities and ensuring that resources are allocated effectively for their delivery. The Board reviews the management and performance of the Met Office and ensures high standards of corporate governance are maintained… As a Non-Executive Director (NED) on the Met Office Board, you will have an important and demanding role and will provide a valuable external perspective to the organisation. This includes providing influence and access to networks which the organisation would otherwise not have.”

Time: 27 days per annum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 26 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 27 November

– – – – – – – – – –

British Library – Board Members

“In 2023, the British Library will mark its 50th anniversary as the national library of the United Kingdom and, in Living Knowledge (published in 2015), the Library has set out an ambitious vision for growth, innovation and development as that landmark date approaches. Major developments under way include projects to digitise and make globally available its most important historic collections; to refresh and transform its service to researchers, online and on-site; to widen its reach and presence for people across the UK, including new partnerships with public libraries; to extend and enhance its Grade 1-listed building in St Pancras, London, as part of a major development partnership; and – over the longer term – to renew and improve its 43-acre campus at Boston Spa in Yorkshire, where the majority of the collection is now held… Members of the Board have corporate responsibility for ensuring that the British Library complies with any statutory or administrative requirements for the use of public funds. ”

Time: 1-2 days per month, four-year term.

Remuneration: £9130 per annum.

Closes: 03 December

– – – – – – – – – –

Committee on Fuel Poverty – Member

“The Committee on Fuel Poverty (CFP) advises the Government on the effectiveness of policies aimed at reducing fuel poverty to help keep UK residents warm and improve energy efficiency in their homes. It also persuades greater co-ordination across organisations working to reduce fuel poverty in the UK… The responsibilities of the new Members will include monitoring and reporting on progress towards the Government’s 2030 fuel poverty target and interim milestones, supporting and challenging the Government on its delivery approach, and encouraging a partnership approach between and within Government and stakeholders in tackling fuel poverty.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £8400 per annum plus reasonable travel and subsistence.

Closes: 06 December

Calling Conservatives: New public appointments announced. Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation – and more.

Further details enclosed.

Six years ago, the TaxPayers’ Alliance reported that “in the last year, five times more Labour people were appointed to public bodies than Tories”.

Since then, the figures have varied, and some Conservative members or supporters have been selected to fill important posts. 

Nonetheless, it remains the case that, since it took office in 2010, our Party has punched beneath its weight when it comes to public appointments. One of the reasons seems to be that Tories simply don’t apply in the same number as Labour supporters.

To help remedy this, every week we put up links to some of the main public appointments vacancies, so that qualified Conservatives might be aware of the opportunities presented.

– – – – – – – – – –

British Transport Police Authority – Members

“Members of the BTPA play an active role in working towards ensuring that an effective and efficient police service is provided on the railways. Collectively, the BTPA will be accountable for the discharge of the responsibilities set out in the legislation. Members’ primary responsibility will be to the work of the BTPA as a whole rather than as a representative of any area from which they may come. In order to fulfil this role, the Secretary of State expects that a Member will be required to commit 30 days a year to BTPA business, although this may not necessarily arise in a regular pattern. Whilst the majority of the work will take place in Camden in London, where both the BTPA and BTP Force headquarters are based, there may be some requirement to travel to other parts of the country where the BTP operates.”

Time: 30 days per annum.

Remuneration: £16,497 per annum.

Closes: 12 November

– – – – – – – – – –

Ministry of Justice – Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Probation

“The Chief Inspector has a duty to ensure the inspection of probation and youth offending services in England and Wales and provide independent scrutiny of the quality of work undertaken with individual offenders. Probation provision is currently delivered by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) which are subject to contract management oversight by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) and the National Probation Service (NPS), which is directly line managed as part of HMPPS. HMI Probation is responsible for delivering and developing programmes of inspection and the inspection methodology or “framework” against which both probation services provision and Youth Offending Teams are inspected. The Chief Inspector is actively engaged in leading the day to day inspection process.”

Time: Full-time, three years.

Remuneration: £135,000 per annum, pensionable.

Closes: 12 November

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HS2 Ltd – Non-Executive Directors

“As Non-Executive Director, you will champion the HS2 vision and objectives, challenging Board decisions where appropriate to maintain the aspired strategic direction and culture of the organisation whilst holding the leadership team to account for effective and efficient delivery against the agreed strategy and business plan. This will include offering alternative perspectives to the sector norm, with the ability to consider strategic, complex and often sensitive issues from an informed and balanced perspective. You will need recent and relevant Executive Board or Non-Executive Director experience with the tenacity and interpersonal skills to operate in a high profile organisation tasked with delivering against demanding objectives.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £950 per diem.

Closes: 16 November

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Health and Care Professions Council – Chair of Council

“We are seeking to appoint a Chair of Council. You will have experience of providing strong non-executive leadership and be able to uphold the principles of transparency and accountability in all of the HCPC’s activities. You will act as an ambassador for the HCPC, influencing and building effective relationships internally and externally with a range of senior level stakeholders, inspiring confidence in the organisation and promoting the organisation’s central commitment to public protection. The Chair of Council appointment is open to both Lay and Registrant candidates. The HCPC is committed to equality of opportunity and actively guards against unfair discrimination on any grounds (including sexual orientation, religion or beliefs, race, sex, age or disability). We are a UK-wide regulator and encourage applicants from all countries of the UK.”

Time: Three days per week approx.

Remuneration: £65,000 annual allowance.

Closes: 19 November

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Met Office – Non-Executive Directors

“The Met Office employs around 1900 people in sites across the UK and overseas. It operates as a Trading Fund, meaning that, whilst it is sponsored by HM Government, it self-funds through the services it provides to its diverse client base. The Met Office steering Board has a vital role in advising and supporting the Chief Executive and the Executive Team to deliver the organisation’s strategic priorities and ensuring that resources are allocated effectively for their delivery. The Board reviews the management and performance of the Met Office and ensures high standards of corporate governance are maintained… As a Non-Executive Director (NED) on the Met Office Board, you will have an important and demanding role and will provide a valuable external perspective to the organisation. This includes providing influence and access to networks which the organisation would otherwise not have.”

Time: 27 days per annum.

Remuneration: £15,000 per annum.

Closes: 26 November

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Office of Tax Simplification – Chair

“We are looking for a motivated individual to Chair the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS). This role offers a unique opportunity to participate in tax policy-making at the heart of government. The Chair will lead the OTS board’s bimonthly meetings and the Office’s engagement with HM Treasury ministers.  The OTS board is responsible for shaping the strategy and priorities of the OTS, deciding on proposals for potential reviews to put forward to the Chancellor and agreeing key recommendations in the reviews. The Chair will also represent the OTS at public engagements and can be requested to present evidence on the Office’s work to Parliamentary Committees. The recommended candidate for the Chair role will require approval by the Chancellor of the Exchequer before the appointment can be confirmed and will be subject to a post-appointment hearing held by the Treasury Select Committee.”

Time: Up to two days per month.

Remuneration: £400 per diem.

Closes: 27 November

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Committee on Fuel Poverty – Member

“The Committee on Fuel Poverty (CFP) advises the Government on the effectiveness of policies aimed at reducing fuel poverty to help keep UK residents warm and improve energy efficiency in their homes. It also persuades greater co-ordination across organisations working to reduce fuel poverty in the UK… The responsibilities of the new Members will include monitoring and reporting on progress towards the Government’s 2030 fuel poverty target and interim milestones, supporting and challenging the Government on its delivery approach, and encouraging a partnership approach between and within Government and stakeholders in tackling fuel poverty.”

Time: Two days per month.

Remuneration: £8400 per annum plus reasonable travel and subsistence.

Closes: 06 December