Amendments 080-080 – Amendments to the Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII, Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II – A8-0462/2018(080-080)

Amendments 080-080 – A8-0462/2018 – REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II Source : …

Amendments 080-080 - A8-0462/2018 - REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II

Source : © European Union, 2019 - EP

Amendments 001-067 – Amendments to the Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII, Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II – A8-0462/2018(001-067) – Committee on Constitutional Affairs

Amendments 001-067 – A8-0462/2018 – REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex IICommittee …

Amendments 001-067 - A8-0462/2018 - REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II
Committee on Constitutional Affairs

Source : © European Union, 2018 - EP

Amendments 068-072 – Amendments to the Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII, Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II – A8-0462/2018(068-072)

Amendments 068-072 – A8-0462/2018 – REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II Source : …

Amendments 068-072 - A8-0462/2018 - REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II

Source : © European Union, 2019 - EP

Amendments 073-074 – Amendments to the Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII, Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II – A8-0462/2018(073-074)

Amendments 073-074 – A8-0462/2018 – REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II Source : …

Amendments 073-074 - A8-0462/2018 - REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II

Source : © European Union, 2019 - EP

Amendments 075-076 – Amendments to the Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII, Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II – A8-0462/2018(075-076)

Amendments 075-076 – A8-0462/2018 – REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II Source : …

Amendments 075-076 - A8-0462/2018 - REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II

Source : © European Union, 2019 - EP

Damian Hinds: Labour is wrong to turn its back on academies

Putting teachers and heads in charge has consistently allowed schools and pupils to excel. We must continue to put our trust in them.

Damian Hinds is Education Secretary and MP for East Hampshire.

Trust. In the education world it has two distinct, yet related, meanings. One is the trust we place in head teachers, school leaders, and teachers to run schools and teach our children effectively.

The other is in terms of Academy Trusts: charitable organisations given the freedom to improve standards in the most appropriate way for that school environment.

Together they form the academies programme, which hands power back to schools and school leaders to make the right decisions for their pupils and communities, while providing teachers with mentoring, training, and the opportunity to share good practices.

I believe the programme is working: secondary school data out today show that converter academies achieve results well above the national average, and research out yesterday showed that standards are rising faster in the majority of sponsored academies than in similar council run schools.

This is great news for pupils, as figures out this week show more than 50 per cent of children in state-funded schools in England are now studying at one of the country’s 8,000 academies or free schools.

At this key milestone, we can be proud that generations of children stand a better chance of receiving a high-quality education that meets their needs, interests and abilities.

When the Conservatives came to government in 2010, the academies programme had already been around for a decade, with the aim of improving pupil performance and breaking the cycle of low expectations. The first academy opened in 2002 and 203 schools, mostly in inner cities, had been opened by the time Labour left office. Labour MP’s were praising their results from the rooftops.

Then the Conservatives came to power, with the inimitable Michael Gove as Education Secretary, and “rocket boosters” were put under the Academies programme, with more than 1,000 academies converting by August 2011.

The idea behind academies is simple really: teachers and school leaders know best how to run schools. This is backed up by research from the OECD. It found the creation of more autonomous schools improves outcomes, as school leaders have the freedom to innovate in curriculum, instruction, and governance.

We now have a system where a school can convert to be an academy – taking advantage of the autonomy and freedom that brings. Or a failing school is issued an academy order and brokered into an Academy Trust, to get the help and support it needs to improve – a so called ‘sponsored academy’.

Hillcrest Academy primary in the Chapeltown area of Leeds – one of the most deprived areas of the country, with historically poor outcomes for pupils – has seen a huge turnaround thanks to academisation. Hillcrest had 14 head teachers in 20 years, and had declined from a ‘good’ school in 2007, to ‘requires improvement’ in 2010, to ‘inadequate’ in 2013. In the space of two and a half years, after joining the GORSE Academies Trust, it received an ‘outstanding’ rating from Ofsted, and hit has above-average reading, writing and maths skills and below-average pupil absence.

Converting into an academy also works for schools who are already doing well, but want to take advantage of the greater responsibility that comes with academisation. The Bicknell School, a special school in Bournemouth that had been rated ‘good’ in two inspections, became Tregonwell Academy in 2011. In its first inspection it was judged ‘outstanding’ in all areas, and has benefited ever since from putting teachers in the driving seat. It was inspected again in January 2018 and has retained its outstanding judgement.

Despite the positive trend for academies, Angela Rayner, Labour’s Shadow Education Secretary, wants to end the academies programme and bring all schools back under local authority control. This would see a Labour-led “National Education Service”, with the government defining the curriculum for all schools and freedoms for heads stripped away. I wrote about this on ConHome when she first made the announcement, but to remind readers exactly what she said:

“We’ll start by immediately ending the Tories’ academy and free schools programmes. They neither improve standards nor empower staff or parents… we will use our time in government to bring all publicly funded schools back into the mainstream public sector, with a common rulebook and under local democratic control.”

Not even wanting to get into what a common rule book written by Jeremy Corbyn would look like, in turning their back on academies Labour are turning their back on the freedom and innovation that have seen standards in our schools rise – putting ideology before what is right for our children.

Not only are academies and free schools some of the best-performing in the country, they can completely overturn expectations for entire communities where low achievement and stifled hope and opportunity had been the norm.

The Conservatives’ trust in educators to have the freedom to run schools in a way that best suits their local needs has paid dividends. I firmly believe in the academies programme, and that is why I will continue to advocate for the opportunities that becoming an academy can bring.

Amendments 083-083 – Amendments to the Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII, Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II – A8-0462/2018(083-083)

Amendments 083-083 – A8-0462/2018 – REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II Source : …

Amendments 083-083 - A8-0462/2018 - REPORT on amendments to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure affecting Chapters 1 and 4 of Title I; Chapter 3 of Title V; Chapters 4 and 5 of Title VII; Chapter 1 of Title VIII; Title XII; Title XIV and Annex II

Source : © European Union, 2019 - EP

Court orders Italy to pay damages to Amanda Knox

American was denied sufficient legal assistance, European Court of Human Rights rules.

The European Court of Human Rights ordered Italy to pay €18,400 in damages to Amanda Knox, who was found guilty of murdering her flatmate but later had the conviction overturned.

The court ruled that Knox had not received sufficient legal assistance — including a professional translator — during questioning following the murder of Meredith Kercher in Perugia in November 2007. Knox, an American, and Kercher, from the U.K., were flatmates studying in Italy.

“Ms. Knox had been particularly vulnerable, being a foreign young woman, 20 at the time, not having been in Italy for very long and not being fluent in Italian,” the ECHR said in a press release.

The court ordered Italy to pay €10,400 to Knox in damages and another €8,000 for costs and expenses. However, the court said there was not enough evidence to support claims that Knox suffered psychological and physical mistreatment by police.

Knox served four years in prison for the killing of Kercher, before being released on appeal and then finally being acquitted in March 2015.

Ivory Coast-born Rudy Guede is serving a 16-year sentence for his role in the killing.


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What will the party debate at Spring Conference?

The party meets again at its Spring Conference in York on the 17th-19th March, and if you have not registered yet there is still time! Federal Conference Committee has also now met to decide the agenda so we can reveal what topics will be up for debate. Motion selection proceeded in the usual fashion that by now […]

The party meets again at its Spring Conference in York on the 17th-19th March, and if you have not registered yet there is still time! Federal Conference Committee has also now met to decide the agenda so we can reveal what topics will be up for debate.

Motion selection proceeded in the usual fashion that by now will be familiar to many readers – in the first round, members of the committee debated the suitability of each motion for debate considering how well it was drafted, how recently the topic was last debated and so on. Once that has happened, timings are allocated to each motion, and the committee considers the relative priority of the remaining motions.

Of the 19 motions submitted, 6 were eventually selected for debate. Constitutional amendments must be selected for debate if they are in order, which applied to one of two submitted amendments. A 105-minute slot has also been reserved for a later deadline on Europe, as given the current state of politics any motion submitted now would certainly be old news by March!

Although the submitters are listed below, this information is not given to any member of Federal Conference Committee until after the motions selection meeting. All that is known is by which constitutional route the motion has been submitted – i.e. By an SAO, a local party, 10 or more members etc. In the case of a motion submitted by 10 or more members, the committee is also no longer informed how many members signed up to the motion, ensuring that motions are selected strictly on their own merits.

* Zoe O'Connell is a Councillor and deputy group leader on Cambridge City Council, sits on the executive of LGBT+ Liberal Democrats and is Vice Chair of Federal Conference Committee.

Motion for a resolution on the draft Commission implementing decision authorising the placing on the market of products containing, consisting of or produced from genetically modified maize MON 87403 (MON-874Ø3-1), pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 1829/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council – B8-2019-0075

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTIONpursuant to Rule 106(2) and (3) of the Rules of Procedureon the draft Commission implementing decision authorising the placing on the market of products containing, consisting of or produced from genetically modified maize MON 87…

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION
pursuant to Rule 106(2) and (3) of the Rules of Procedure
on the draft Commission implementing decision authorising the placing on the market of products containing, consisting of or produced from genetically modified maize MON 87403 (MON-874Ø3-1), pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 1829/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council
(D059691/02 - 2019/2523(RSP))
Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety

Source : © European Union, 2019 - EP